proximity


Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for November 15, 2017 is:

proximity • \prahk-SIM-uh-tee\  • noun

: the quality or state of being proximate : closeness

Examples:

“[T]he company’s main advantages as an exporter include proximity to the U.S. market, quality of production and its ability to alter production to suit the needs and design tastes of U.S. consumers.” — Thomas Russell, Furniture Today, 4 Oct. 2017

“Common interests, shared experiences and momentum are the things that bind superficial relationships…, but remove the natural closeness that proximity creates and you find that having once shared a few high school classes is not enough to sustain a lifelong relationship.” — Jonathan Look, Forbes, 24 Sept. 2017

Did you know?

The history of proximity hinges on the idea of closeness, both physical and metaphorical. English speakers borrowed the word from Middle French, which in turn acquired it from Latin proximitat-, proximitas, forms of the adjective proximus, meaning “nearest” or “next.” A number of other languages, including Catalan, Portuguese, and Italian, derived similar words from Latin proximus. Other descendants of proximus in English include proximal, proximate, and the somewhat more rare approximal (meaning “contiguous”).

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