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‘Good Omens’ First Look: David Tennant and Michael Sheen Rock Dyed Hair and Colorful Suits

Good Omens

Monday has arrived with some good omens, indeed.

Neil Gaiman, who will be writing and running the miniseries adaptation of his and Terry Pratchett‘s 1990 novel Good Omens, released the first look at stars David Tennant and Michael Sheen in costume as the demon Crowley and angel Aziraphale, respectively. Three words: Blonde. Michael. Sheen.

It was an inspired piece of casting for the Amazon and BBC miniseries to bring on Tennant as the devil-may-care (pun intended) Crowley and Sheen as his fussy, uptight foil.

Now with principal photography beginning in London for the miniseries, The Good Omens first looks shows the two actors already inhabiting their roles, with Tennant striking a pose beneath his dyed red locks and rocker-style suit and Sheen looking prim, with his bleach-blonde hair perfectly matching the color of his tan suit.

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Gaiman’s caption refers to the beginning of the book, which takes place in a flashback 11 years before the Apocalypse, when the longtime enemies-turned-unlikely-allies strike a deal to avert the end of the world. It’s not as grim as the situation appears, however — Good Omens is more offbeat fantasy-comedy than bleak apocalypse story. Described as a part fantasy-drama, part horror-comedy series, Good Omens takes place in 2018 “when the Apocalypse is near and Final Judgment is set to descend upon humanity,” according to Deadline. Unfortunately, someone has misplaced the Antichrist, prompting Crowley and Aziraphale to join a race to find him and stop the end of the world.

Gaiman tweeted the picture from the London set and said Monday:

“People have fallen in love with an angel and a demon in a book by Terry Pratchett and me, and they have been excited and nervous to see how they would appear on screen — and I was probably the most nervous and excited of all… Michael Sheen is the best and finest of bookseller angels, David Tennant the coolest and most delightful of demons. Together they are one hell of a double act (or do I mean one made in Heaven?)”

Good Omens will be Gaiman’s second time acting as a showrunner for a series, creating Neverwhere for BBC in 1996, which he later adapted into a book. The Hugo Award-winning writer has frequently written for television series like Doctor Who, and Babylon 5, but this will be his first time spearheading an adaptation of one of his works. More recently, Bryan Fuller‘s TV adaptation of American Gods has made waves over at Starz.

Gaiman initially refused to adapt Good Omens himself, stating that he and co-writer Terry Pratchett had agreed to adapt it together. But when Pratchett passed away in March 2015, Gaiman received a post-humous letter from his co-writer giving Gaiman his blessing to adapt Good Omens and requesting that Gaiman write the adaptation himself. Soon, Amazon announced Gaiman was working on a miniseries adaptation earlier this year, and the production has moved quickly from the page to the set. It’s a happy ending for a project that had long languished in development hell after Terry Gilliam‘s planned film adaptation of Good Omens starring Robin Williams and Johnny Depp fell through in 2002.

Good Omens will be directed and executive produced by Emmy winner Douglas Mackinnon, known for Sherlock and Outlander. The miniseries also stars Jack Whitehall, Michael McKean, Miranda Richardson, Adria Arjona, Nina Sosanya, Ned Dennehy, and Ariyon Bakare.

Shooting will continue for six months in London, Oxfordshire and South Africa. The series is aiming for a 2019 premiere.

The post ‘Good Omens’ First Look: David Tennant and Michael Sheen Rock Dyed Hair and Colorful Suits appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/good-omens-first-look-david-tennant-and-michael-sheen/

Film

‘mother!’ Spoiler Review: So Let’s Talk About What the Heck This Movie is About

mother! early reviews

(In our Spoiler Reviews, we take a deep dive into a new release and get to the heart of what makes it tick…and every story point is up for discussion. In this entry: Darren Aronofsky’s mother!)

Darren Aronofsky’s talents extend beyond his gripping filmmaking, inspiring intense debate among those who watch the finished product. His latest film, mother!, is starting to inspire the loudest debate of all: those who have seen the film (whether or not they’ve walked out before it ended) are fiercely divided among those who love it and those who helped give it a CinemaScore of F this past weekend. Technically, a lot happens in mother!, but there’s not exactly a plot or character arcs on display (neither of which, of course, are necessary). The film does bear similarities to many of Aronofsky’s previous films, from Black Swan to Noah, but it’s still very singular. What else could you call a movie where a massive group of people devour a newborn baby?

Ah, but I’m getting ahead of myself. To attempt to answer the question at the core of mother! — to wit, what the hell is this about? — it’s worth exploring the multiple allegories that present themselves throughout.

Opening Up the Good Book

Let’s acknowledge that it’s to Darren Aronofsky’s credit that two people can watch this movie and walk out with wildly different interpretations to what they just saw. Ostensibly, mother! is about a married couple living in a beautiful country house in the middle of nowhere who unexpectedly have to deal with an ever-growing group of guests arriving at all hours of the day. The husband, credited only as Him (Javier Bardem), is a celebrated poet who has writer’s block as the film begins. The wife, credited as Mother (Jennifer Lawrence), occupies her day by renovating the three-story house and performing duties that would feel appropriate to a wife in the 1940s: cooking, cleaning, and generally trying to please her mercurial spouse.

Him is a creator. That word crops up often enough in the script to make its intentions clear, and that’s before Him and Mother are visited by their first two guests – a Man (Ed Harris) and his wife (Michelle Pfeiffer) – who are not only great admirers of Him’s work, but who need a place to say for reasons that elude Mother’s understanding but are enough to please Him. Mother is perhaps too polite to push Him at first, but relents when Him reveals that the Man has told Him that he’s dying and simply wished to visit the artist before he passes away.

Both the Man and Woman are unable to stop nosing into Him’s affairs, even sneaking into his office to look upon a mysterious gem that he keeps on a pedestal. (More about that later.) Although she tries to keep Him’s office free of visitors, Mother soon has to deal with two new houseguests: the Man and Woman’s large adult sons, two warring brothers who immediately get into a fight over the Man’s will until the older son (Domhnall Gleeson) kills the younger son (Brian Gleeson, and yes, Domhnall is his real-life brother).

These elements alone are not hard to tie to some of the more recognizable stories from the Bible, stories whose general gist you know even if, like me, you’re not a terribly religious person. There is the story of Adam and Eve, and their being unable to resist the forbidden fruit, a la the Man and Woman and Him’s mysterious gem, which they accidentally break after attempting to hold it. And there is the story of Cain and Abel, the sons of Adam and Eve, two brothers overcome with jealousy who fight each other, with the older brother killing the younger one.

It’s almost too easy to see mother! as a combination of religious allegories all thrown into the same stew. A makeshift funeral and wake for the Youngest Brother (as the film credits him) goes raucously awry when a group of guests refuse to listen to Mother’s desperate pleas and destroy a sink in their kitchen, causing a water line break. Then, finally, the Man and Woman vacate the premises, after which Him and Mother have passionate sex, which leads to her being pregnant with their first child and him getting the inspiration to write a new piece.

The second and final section of the film depicts Mother trying to tend her house on the same day when a) Him is celebrating the publication of his latest work with a never-ending group of fans and b) she ends up giving birth to a baby boy. The celebration quickly devolves from a wild party to a genuine and violent riot replete with protesters, riot police, torture, and murder. The whole mad affair culminates with Mother delivering her child in Him’s previously walled-off study. After an initial period of rest, Him takes the child to satiate his followers; they take the child, break its neck, and then literally eat it down to the bone, to Mother’s horror and fury. Here, too, there are recognizable enough Biblical connections: their newborn could be the baby Jesus, and the way that the Man’s rabid fans instantly shift from being in awe of the child to killing and consuming him could reflect the latter days of Jesus before his crucifixion.

The final moments of the film, after Mother reasonably loses her patience and burns down the house, could very clearly speak to the religious angle. The only survivors of the blast — leaving aside the fact that were this a more real-world story, which it’s not, no one could possibly make it out alive — are Him and Mother. Him calls himself the creator as he cradles Mother’s burning body to her final resting place, the former making it out without a scratch on him. He’s able to restart this cycle by taking another of the mysterious gems out of Mother’s body, where her heart resided. Then, a new young woman and a new house rise from the ashes, just as they did when Lawrence’s character materialized at the start.

So that could be what’s going on in mother!. But there are other metaphors present within the text and subtext, impossible to avoid.

mother cinemascore

It’s Hard Out Here For An Artist

mother! opens and closes with scenes that suggest the events we see in between have happened before and will happen again. The opening image is of one young woman (not Lawrence) standing in the middle of a fiery blaze, a tear trailing down her cheek before she dies and leaves behind the aforementioned sparkling gem that Harris’ Man and Pfeiffer’s Woman break later.

Then in those final moments, there’s Lawrence standing in the middle of another fiery blaze, having destroyed the house that was meant to bring her such joy, a tear trailing down her cheek. Him survives both blazes and is able to retrieve another gem from Mother, literally reaching into her burning body, ripping out her heart, and excavating to discover the gem. Once Mother dies, turning to ash, Him places the gem on a pedestal and the house revives itself. And then we see Him’s bed, a new young woman lying on it. She wakes up, turns, calls for him, and the movie ends. Lather, rinse, repeat.

I know: these could suggest the religious connections. But in between the two explosions, Him and Mother grapple with their own awkward and sometimes icy relationship. First, they do so via their older married guests, the latter of whom harangues Mother about having children, acting like the younger woman’s actual mother despite barely knowing her. Later, Mother goads Him about the fact that they’re never physical together, after which they finally have sex. Instantly, two things happen: Mother declares herself to be pregnant and Him all but has a light bulb pop up over his head. He’s inspired to write a new work, so much so that he doesn’t even get dressed before he gets the words out of his head. The final result is apparently perfect, something that Mother as well as his eventual hangers-on seem to believe.

The final stretch of film is genuinely, intentionally chaotic: Mother giving birth in Him’s study is an oasis in violence, almost like Aronofsky’s version of the third act of Alfonso Cuaron’s Children of Men. And yet, here is a second reading: mother! is not about religion as much as it is about the experience of working through a creative muse, lighting upon an idea for a work of art, making the work of art, and releasing it upon a public that is at turns appreciative and vicious, often with barely any separation between the two. The fans who treat Mother’s child like it’s in a rock concert’s mosh pit and then devour the babe are the equivalent of an artist’s devotees indulging in their latest work. Him could be Aronofsky himself (or any artist who’s confident enough to believe they’re worth being idolized), Mother is the artist’s muse, and the baby is the culmination of whatever inspires the artist.

Considering this and the next allegorical possibility, it’s difficult to imagine that Bardem is playing anyone but Aronofsky. That in mind, it’s up for grabs to figure out which of Aronofsky’s previous films this could refer to. Maybe it’s The Fountain, which spent years in development before becoming a fully realized passion project that starred his then-fiancée Rachel Weisz and has gained a cult following over the years. Or maybe it’s Noah, a nakedly religious story that also spent years in development before becoming a less celebrated work than earlier successes like Black Swan or Requiem for a Dream.

Whatever the case, much of mother! feels like Darren Aronofsky commenting on just how hard it is for him, or for any artist, to come up with something new. It’s only through being pushed and insulted and goaded that Him gains true, pure inspiration: when Mother snaps at him about his coldness towards her physically, he responds roughly in that passionate sex scene that begins as something closer to rape before turning (apparently) consensual. When we smash-cut to the seemingly content couple asleep in bed, Mother seems to inherently, intuitively know that she is pregnant, that something new is burrowing within her. That unwavering knowledge leads Him to immediately leap out of bed and start writing, sitting on the floor of their living room naked, just so he can get whatever is in his mind onto a sheet of paper. This shared intuition manifests quickly; Mother only gets a few seconds with her own child before it becomes the fans’ property. And then, after a period of destruction, the cycle starts again. Him receives a new muse, a new gem, and a new canvas on which to create his next magnum opus.

If the religious angle is textual, and the artistic angle is a mix of textual and subtextual, then it’s only fitting for the final allegory to leap even further.

Continue Reading Mother Spoiler Review >>

The post ‘mother!’ Spoiler Review: So Let’s Talk About What the Heck This Movie is About appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/mother-spoiler-review/

Film

‘mother!’ Gets an ‘F’ on Cinemascore, an Ironic Rare Badge of Honor

mother cinemascore

mother! is polarizing, to say the least.

While critics have lauded the film for its provocative and daring narrative with an absolutely off-the-rails third act — while also eliciting a fair share of both revulsion and reverence amongst them — audiences are firmly against Darren Aronofsky‘s newest film. Blame it on misleading marketing, or star Jennifer Lawrence drawing in fans who “just wouldn’t get it,” but mother! has earned the rare “F” grade on Cinemascore.

Cinemascore is an audience polling firm that tests random reactions after people leave a movie. While the public at large doesn’t necessarily care about a movie’s Cinemascore, it is often an accurate representation of the film’s word-of-mouth, which remains a powerful factor despite all the hoopla made about Rotten Tomatoes killing movies’ box office numbers (it’s not).

Only rarely are films rated below the B or C rating on Cinemascore, with D’s or F’s often acting as a marker of bad or misleading marketing rather than bad creative decisions — though often it can be both. While Rotten Tomatoes has been criticized for turning movie reviews into a binary equation, there’s even less room for nuance on Cinemascore.

Ed Mintz, Cinemascore’s founder, explained in a 2016 interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal that the scores act as an indicator of the movie’s business outlook.

“A’s generally are good, B’s generally are shaky, and C’s are terrible. D’s and F’s, they shouldn’t have made the movie, or they promoted it funny and the absolute wrong crowd got into it.”

Only eight other movies have achieved the rare, and arguably coveted, “F” on Cinemascore. Here they are below, with their corresponding Rotten Tomatoes ratings:

  • Killing Them Softly (74%)
  • Solaris (66%)
  • Bug (61%)
  • Wolf Creek (53%)
  • Darkness (4%)
  • The Box (45%)
  • Silent House (42%)
  • The Devil Inside (7%)

And what kinds of films get that exemplary A+ Cinemascore? It’s an elite club as well, containing crowd-pleasers like The Help, Titanic, The Blind Side, Toy Story, and… Soul Surfer. While cinephiles may scoff at the “mainstream-ness” of it all, prestigious dramas like Schindler’s List, A Few Good Men, and Driving Miss Daisy make the grade too.

It’s no surprise that mother!, which had been mostly marketed as a straight haunted-house horror film, would earn audience distaste. /Film’s Chris Evangelista calls the film “bonkers,” and acknowledges that it’s a movie that audiences will either love or hate, stating, “By the time the end credits roll on mother!, you’re either going to be on board with the lunacy Aronofsky is selling, or you’ll be annoyed at how thick he laid it all on. At the very least, though, you won’t be bored.”

The post ‘mother!’ Gets an ‘F’ on Cinemascore, an Ironic Rare Badge of Honor appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/mother-cinemascore-f/

Film

Watch Stephen Colbert’s 2017 Emmys Opening Number, Monologue & Other Highlights

2017 Emmys Opening - Stephen Colbert

The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards were broadcast on CBS last night, handing out awards to HBO’s Big Little Lies and Veep, Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Netflix’s Black Mirror, NBC’s This Is Us, FX’s Atlanta, and many more (get the full list of winners right here). But if you weren’t able to watch, we have the best moments from the show for your viewing pleasure.

The Late Show host Stephen Colbert served as master of ceremonies, opening the show with a musical number and an extensive monologue that featured one surprising guest that not only shocked people, but also made them feel a little uncomfortable. Plus, we get to see Emmy come to life thanks to Ru Paul, and Stephen Colbert breaks down during his hosting gig and needs a little Westworld check-up.

Check out the 2017 Emmys opening monologue, musical number and more below.

First up, here’s the opening musical number, thanks to the folks at Pitchfork:

https://players.brightcove.net/78144477/HJ1F9mOa_default/index.html?videoId=5578999219001

If you’re not keeping up with all the hip music the kids like to listen to these days, that’s Chance the Rapper who helps out with this musical number, along with the cast members of This Is Us, Stranger Things, Veep, Black-ish, The Americans and more. There’s no doubt that the world is better on TV right now, but I probably could have done without seeing a demogorgon clapping it’s terrifying mouth to the beat of this musical number.

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After the musical opening, Colbert took to the stage to tell some jokes with an extensive monologue about the state of television, making no attempts to pull back on jabs directed toward Donald Trump and his administration of buffoons. One of the members of the administration even stopped by for a quick bit, with former White House communications director Sean Spicer appearing to hype up the Emmy viewing audience. Melissa McCarthy (who brilliantly played Spicer on Saturday Night Live) didn’t look too pleased with his appearance and much of the audience looked shocked that he was there, with many online thinking that this joke just didn’t have the impact the writers hoped it might have.

Throughout the rest of the night, there were some other fun bits, such as Stephen Colbert glitching as a host, forcing him to get checked out by Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) from Westworld. If you ever wanted to see a nude Stephen Colbert wearing just a bowtie, then this was a dream come true.

Stephen Colbert also took the time to interview Emmy herself, as played by drag queen icon Ru Paul, who sadly didn’t take home the Emmy for Outstanding Reality Competition Program last night. Ru Paul looked positively fabulous, and we would be so lucky to have a trophy that looks so great.

Finally, the Television Academy paid tribute to all those amazing talents that we lost in the year since the last Emmy awards. There are some on-screen giants here, as well as some amazing talents from behind the camera. One person we probably could have done without honoring in any capacity, however, was the sexual harasser Roger Ailes.

***

All in all, this was a rather tame and lame Emmy ceremony. It’s not as if these awards shows are particularly exciting, but even the more entertaining moments weren’t all that remarkable. The winners themselves were easily the best part, with plenty of first-time winners, diverse talents honored, and a powerful showing by Hulu, knocking out not only the cable and broadcast networks, but Netflix too. We’ll see what impact this has on the future of television as time goes on.

If you’d like to see more highlights from the 2017 Emmy awards, check out the CBS YouTube channel, which has some of the speeches from winners and other moments from the broadcast.

The post Watch Stephen Colbert’s 2017 Emmys Opening Number, Monologue & Other Highlights appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/watch-stephen-colberts-2017-emmys-opening-number-monologue-other-highlights/

Film

POTD: Read Jimmy Fallon’s Alternate Titles for ‘Almost Famous’

Almost Famous Alternate Titles

If you don’t love Almost Famous as much as most of the staff of /Film does, then you might not know that the original title for the film was Untitled. If you watch “The Bootleg Cut” (or director’s cut) that was released on DVD back in 2001 and re-released on Blu-ray in 2011, you’ll see the real title appear, as it was preferred by director Cameron Crowe (who is the one doing the handwritten opening credits as well).

Before the title Almost Famous was settled upon, there was a time when Cameron Crowe was trying to figure out what else he could call the movie, since Untitled was not the most desirable name for the studio to sell. One person who tried to help Cameron Crowe figure out a satisfying alternate title was supporting star Jimmy Fallon, and the director recently revealed the full list of options he was presented with by the man who would go on to host The Tonight Show.

Here’s Jimmy Fallon’s full list of Almost Famous alternate titles revealed on Twitter:

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My favorites from this list are I’m With The Band, The B-Sides and The Vinyl Years. There’s something that I like about Nothing Up My Sleeve (Except for My New Record), but that’s probably best saved for a stand-u comedy album of some sort. There are plenty of choices on here that are clearly jokes, including a trilogy of Doin’ It movies.

So where did the title Almost Famous come from?

CNN anchor Jake Tapper actually asked this very question to Cameron Crowe on Twitter, to which Crowe responded, “It was David Geffen’s idea… but it wasn’t his first choice. He really liked My Opening Farewell.” David Geffen was one of the co-founders of DreamWorks, who produced Almost Famous.

For my money, I think Almost Famous is a solid title, and it says a lot more about the movie than Untitled, but it’s not hard to understand why Cameron Crowe was so attached to the title to begin with. We’re just glad that eventually we got to see the director’s cut of the movie that the studio wasn’t willing to distribute in theaters.

The post POTD: Read Jimmy Fallon’s Alternate Titles for ‘Almost Famous’ appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/almost-famous-alternate-titles/

Film

The Morning Watch: Animated ‘Game of Thrones’ History, Comparing ‘Black Swan’ and ‘The Wrestler’ & More

Game of Thrones Animated History

(The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.)

In this edition, get a history lesson from Westeros with the animated first chapter of Game of Thrones Conquest & Rebellion. Plus, see how Darren Aronofsky‘s The Wrestler and Black Swan serve as perfect companion pieces, and find out which prestigious award was given to Stephen Tobolowsky on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

First up, created in the style of History & Lore, this animated first chapter of the 45-minute bonus feature from the upcoming home video release of the seventh season of Game of Thrones provides some backstory for House Targaryen. The entire bonus feature provides plenty of new details about the events that shaped the Westeros we know today, thousands of years before the events of Game of Thrones began.

Director Darren Aronofsky has described his films The Wrestler and Black Swan as perfect companion pieces, and a new video essay by Hint of Film examines how the to films and their tragic central characters compliment each other. Say what you will after the flop of mother! this past weekend, but you have to give Aronofsky credit for making films that are compelling and unique enough to warrant us talking about them for years to come.

Finally, while there were a lot of Emmy awards handed out last night, there are plenty of actors who people recognize who just don’t get the acclaim that they should. Jimmy Kimmel wanted to change that by making the That Guy from That Show Awards. There are four nominees, each being an actor who you always see in movies and TV shows but never take the time to learn their name. The winner should be someone you recognize though, because it’s Stephen Tobolowsky!

The post The Morning Watch: Animated ‘Game of Thrones’ History, Comparing ‘Black Swan’ and ‘The Wrestler’ & More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/the-morning-watch-animated-game-of-thrones-history-comparing-black-swan-and-the-wrestler-more/

Film

The Best NFB Films of the 1960s

With 3000+ films that you can stream for free, picking a starting point can be tricky!

Enjoy a (subjective) list of the 10 best NFB films from the 1960s!

21-87

Part commentary on the dizzying speed of modern life, part ode to the confusing beauty of the human condition, this Oscar-nominated Arthur Lipsett short is said to have inspired George Lucas’ concept of The Force.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/21-87/

Buster Keaton Rides Again

Join legendary comic actor Buster Keaton on the set of <em><strong><a href=”http://www.nfb.ca/film/railrodder/”>The Railrodder</a></strong></em>, where he reminisces on a lifetime in show business between hilarious takes.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/buster_keaton_rides_again

Drylanders

Discover the NFB’s very first feature-length drama about the epic saga of a family who leaves Eastern Canada to stake their future on the Prairies.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/drylanders

Ladies and Gentleman… Mr. Leonard Cohen

Tag along a 30-year-old Leonard Cohen as he enjoys a visit to his hometown of Montreal where he reads his poetry, strolls the streets, relaxes in a 3-dollar-a-night hotel room, and even takes a bath.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/ladies_and_gentlemen_mr_leonard_cohen

Lonely Boy

Meet the real Paul Anka in this short documentary about the Canadian boy who rose from obscurity to become the idol of millions of teens in the 1950s and 60s.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/lonely_boy

Paddle to the Sea

Dive into this exciting odyssey from Lake Superior to the sea with this adaptation of the tale of a Native boy who carved a man and a canoe and sent them down river.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/paddle_to_the_sea/

Pas de Deux

Experience a master class in choreography and cinematography in this mesmerizing Oscar®-nominated short by pioneering filmmaker Norman McLaren.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pas_de_deux_en

The Railrodder

Behold a comic genius in one of the last films of his long career. The legendary Buster Keaton crosses Canada from east to west… atop a railway track speeder.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/railrodder

Universe

This doc recreates the universe as it would appear to a voyager barreling through space. This film was among the sources used by Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/Universe/

Walking

Check out this groovy sixties short that illustrates, through various drawing and painting techniques, the many ways people get around on foot.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/walking/

The post The Best NFB Films of the 1960s appeared first on NFB/blog.

Vía http://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2017/09/18/best-nfb-films-1960s/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

The Best NFB Films of the 1960s

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

With 3000+ films that you can stream for free, picking a starting point can be tricky!

Enjoy a (subjective) list of the 10 best NFB films from the 1960s!

21-87

Part commentary on the dizzying speed of modern life, part ode to the confusing beauty of the human condition, this Oscar-nominated Arthur Lipsett short is said to have inspired George Lucas’ concept of The Force.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/21-87/

Buster Keaton Rides Again

Join legendary comic actor Buster Keaton on the set of <em><strong><a href=”http://www.nfb.ca/film/railrodder/”>The Railrodder</a></strong></em>, where he reminisces on a lifetime in show business between hilarious takes.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/buster_keaton_rides_again

Drylanders

Discover the NFB’s very first feature-length drama about the epic saga of a family who leaves Eastern Canada to stake their future on the Prairies.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/drylanders

Ladies and Gentleman… Mr. Leonard Cohen

Tag along a 30-year-old Leonard Cohen as he enjoys a visit to his hometown of Montreal where he reads his poetry, strolls the streets, relaxes in a 3-dollar-a-night hotel room, and even takes a bath.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/ladies_and_gentlemen_mr_leonard_cohen

Lonely Boy

Meet the real Paul Anka in this short documentary about the Canadian boy who rose from obscurity to become the idol of millions of teens in the 1950s and 60s.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/lonely_boy

Paddle to the Sea

Dive into this exciting odyssey from Lake Superior to the sea with this adaptation of the tale of a Native boy who carved a man and a canoe and sent them down river.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/paddle_to_the_sea/

Pas de Deux

Experience a master class in choreography and cinematography in this mesmerizing Oscar®-nominated short by pioneering filmmaker Norman McLaren.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pas_de_deux_en

The Railrodder

Behold a comic genius in one of the last films of his long career. The legendary Buster Keaton crosses Canada from east to west… atop a railway track speeder.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/railrodder

Universe

This doc recreates the universe as it would appear to a voyager barreling through space. This film was among the sources used by Stanley Kubrick in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/Universe/

Walking

Check out this groovy sixties short that illustrates, through various drawing and painting techniques, the many ways people get around on foot.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/walking/

The post The Best NFB Films of the 1960s appeared first on NFB/blog.

from NFB/blog http://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2017/09/18/best-nfb-films-1960s/

Film

2017 Emmy Winners: Updated Live

69th Emmy Awards - 2017 Emmy Winners

The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards are airing right now on CBS with The Late Show host Stephen Colbert serving as master of ceremonies for the prestigious night out with some of television’s finest talents.

The winners are being announced live on television, and below we’ll be updating the list of those lucky enough to take home an Emmy, as well as offering some commentary on the awards as the night goes on. So without further adieu, let’s get to the 2017 Emmy winners.

69th Emmy Awards - 2017 Emmy Winners

The Winners

*The 69th Primetime Emmys are airing live on CBS right now. We’ll post winners as they’re announced*

NO WINNERS ANNOUNCED YET

Meanwhile, the Creative Arts Emmys were handed out last weekend, and here are some of the notable winners:

Outstanding Children’s ProgramOnce Upon a Sesame Street Christmas (HBO)

Outstanding Animated ProgramBob’s Burgers (FOX)

Outstanding Short Form Animated Program Adventure Time (Cartoon Network)

Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction SpecialThe 13th (Netflix)

Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction SeriesPlanet Earth II (BBC)

Outstanding Variety SpecialCarpool Karaoke Primetime Special 2017 (CBS)

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series – Alexis Bledel – The Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu)

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series – Gerald McRaney – This Is Us (NBC)

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series – Melissa McCarthy – Saturday Night Live (NBC)

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series – Dave Chappelle – Saturday Night Live (NBC)

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance – Seth MacFarlane – Family Guy (FOX)

Outstanding Main Title DesignStranger Things (Netflix)

Outstanding Original Main Title Theme MusicStranger Things (Netflix)

Outstanding Special Visual EffectsWestworld (HBO)

Otherwise, while we wait for the Emmy awards broadcast to being, check out the full list of nominees below.

2017 Emmy Nominations

The Nominees

Outstanding Drama Series:

Better Call Saul
The Crown
The Handmaid’s Tale
House of Cards
Stranger Things
This Is Us
Westworld

Outstanding Comedy Series:

Atlanta
Black-ish
Master of None
Modern Family
Silicon Valley
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Veep

Outstanding Television Movie:

Black Mirror
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Dolly Parton’s Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love
Sherlock: The Lying Detective
Wizard of Lies

Outstanding Limited Series:

Big Little Lies
Fargo
Feud
Genius
The Night Of

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series:

Sterling K Brown – This Is Us
Anthony Hopkins – Westworld
Bob Odenkirk – Better Call Saul
Matthew Rhys – The Americans
Liev Schreiber – Ray Donovan
Kevin Spacey – House of Cards
Milo Ventimiglia – This Is Us

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series:

Viola Davis – How to Get Away with Murder
Claire Foy – The Crown
Elisabeth Moss – The Handmaid’s Tale
Keri Russell – The Americans
Evan Rachel Wood – Westworld
Robin Wright – House of Cards

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series:

Anthony Anderson – Black-ish
Aziz Ansari – Master of None
Zach Galifianakis – Baskets
Donald Glover – Atlanta
William H. Macy – Shameless
Jeffrey Tambor – Transparent

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series:

Pamela Adlon – Better Things
Jane Fonda –  Grace and Frankie
Allison Janney – Mom
Ellie Kemper – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Julia Louis-Dreyfus – Veep
Tracee Ellis Ross – Black-ish
Lily Tomlin – Grace and Frankie

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie:

Riz Ahmed – The Night Of
Benedict Cumberbatch – Sherlock
Robert De Niro – Wizard of Lies
Ewan McGregor – Fargo
Geoffrey Rush – Genius
John Turturro – The Night Of

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie:

Carrie Coon – Fargo
Felicity Huffman – American Crime
Nicole Kidman – Big Little Lies
Jessica Lange – Feud: Bette and Joan
Susan Sarandon – Feud: Bette and Joan
Reese Witherspoon – Big Little Lies

Outstanding Reality – Competition Program:

The Amazing Race
American Ninja Warrior
Project Runway
Ru Paul’s Drag Race
Top Chef
The Voice

Outstanding Variety Talk Series:

Full Frontal with Samantha Bee
Jimmy Kimmel Live!
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
The Late Late Show with James Corden
The Late Show with Stephen Colbert
Real Time with Bill Maher

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series:

Billy on the Street
Documentary Now!
Drunk History
Portlandia
Saturday Night Live
Tracey Ullman’s Show

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series:

Jonathan Banks – Better Call Saul
John Lithgow – The Crown
Mandy Patinkin – Homeland
Michael Kelly – House of Cards
David Harbour – Stranger Things
Ron Cephas – This Is Us
Jeffrey Wright – Westworld

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series:

Anna Dowd – The Handmaid’s Tale
Samira Wiley – The Handmaid’s Tale
Uzo Aduba – Orange Is The New Black
Millie Bobby Brown – Stranger Things
Chrissy Mets – This Is Us
Thandie Newton – Westworld

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series:

Louie Anderson – Baskets
Ty Burrell – Modern Family
Alec Baldwin – Saturday Night Live
Tituss Burgess – Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Tony Hale – Veep
Matt Walsh – Veep

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series:

Vanessa Bayer – Saturday Night Live
Leslie Jones – Saturday Night Live
Kate McKinnon – Saturday Night Live
Kathryn Hahn – Transparent
Judith Light – Transparent
Anna Chlumsky – Veep

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie:

Alexander Skarsgard – Big Little Lies
David Thewlis – Fargo
Alfred Molina – Feud: Bette and Joan
Stanley Tucci – Feud: Bette and Joan
Bill Camp – The Night Of
Michael K. Williams – The Night Of

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie:

Regina Kind – American Crime
Laura Dern – Big Little Lies
Shailene Woodley – Big Little Lies
Judy Davis – Feud: Bette and Joan
Jackie Hoffman – Feud: Bette and Joan
Michelle Pfeiffer – Wizard of Lies

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series:

Ben Mendelsohn – Bloodline
B.D. Wong – Mr. Robot
Hank Azaria – Ray Donovan
Denis O’Hare – This Is Us
Brian Tyree Henry – This Is Us
Gerald McRaney – This Is Us

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series:

Alison Wright – The Americans
Alexis Bledel – The Handmaid’s Tale
Cicely Tyson – How to Get Away with Murder
Ann Dowd – The Leftovers
Laverne Cox – Orange Is the New Black
Shannon Purser – Stranger Things

The post 2017 Emmy Winners: Updated Live appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/2017-emmy-winners/

Film

‘Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond’ Review: A Revelatory Treasure Trove of Comedic Brilliance [TIFF]

Man on the Moon Documentary - Man on the Moon Documentary - Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond Review

“When did this movie start?” asks a modern-day Jim Carrey to director Chris Smith. It’s the start of what we know as Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond – With a Very Special, Contractually Obligated Mention of Tony Clifton. It’s also probably one of the more normal things Carrey says or does throughout the documentary, a work presenting unreleased footage shot by Carrey behind the scenes of his Andy Kaufman biopic Man on the Moon.

Read our Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond review from TIFF below.

Rather than do standard promotion for the film in 1999, Carrey convinced Universal Pictures to give him a camera to film his own version of an electronic press kit. In the actor’s mind, a traditional media tour just did not make sense for a movie about a comedian as iconoclastic as Kaufman – especially because his claim to fame was breaking through the stuffiness and self-seriousness of television in the early 1970s. Of course, bored celebrities with smartphones and lots of free time on movie sets now make the type of footage seen here a little commonplace. Similar material is never farther than an Instagram story away these days.

But this is Jim Carrey, after all. The footage is a treasure trove of comedic brilliance and revelatory insights into the process of a performer whose comedy is something like a “fugue state,” as he puts it. As a method actor to assume the persona of Andy Kaufman, Carrey puts Daniel Day-Lewis to shame by terrorizing his esteemed Oscar-winning director Milos Forman. Especially once he gets into the anarchic character of Tony Clifton, an abrasive farcical take on a vintage club performer, the guardrails of his artistic discipline really start to disappear.

While not all the consequences of Carrey’s exploration were positive for everyone around him, the process became a necessary one to fully understand the depths of Kaufman’s craft. In the ‘70s, Kaufman consistently upended expectations because he was willing to offend and disturb. Post-Michael Richards meltdown video, there’s a reticence for comedians to test their audiences in such a way. A joke taken out of context or poorly received now has the power to end a career.

Man on the Moon Documentary

Even by the end of the ‘90s, Universal worried about Carrey taking Kaufman’s approach a little too seriously. To these corporate executives, Carrey was more than just an artist or a performer – he was a star. People have to like stars and want to identify with them. Kaufman relied on alienation as a key facet of his routine, drawing people in by first pushing them away. In an even more corporate environment, the people holding the purse decided the public should not see Carrey in such a light. With millions of dollars tied up in the success of Man on the Moon, they decided to lock his footage away in their equivalent of the Disney vault “so people don’t think you’re an asshole,” as Carrey recounts their decision.

Thanks to the magic of time and the countenance of producer Spike Jonze, the tapes finally see the light of day in Jim and Andy, which might have been for the best. Now unyoked from any burden of needing to put butts in seats, Carrey’s filmed hijinks are now free to serve as a window into the mindset of his boundary-defying performance style. Smith intercuts and overlays a contemporary interview with Carrey, which adds nearly two decades of perspective to the material. It also provides a good deal of insight into what the actor has been up to in recent years.

Since Carrey gradually backed out of the harshest glare of the public eye roughly a decade ago, he underwent a substantial shift of worldview and philosophy that Smith probes in their sit-down. It’s important to understand and take this into account given that Carrey claims his work directly correlates to the deepest questions of his soul when taking a part. Yet Smith could do a better job reigning in some of the more outlandish observations and keeping the focus tightly fixated on playing Kaufman.

When Carrey rambles on about “abstract structures,” his commentary borders on parody of New Age thinking. When he starts detailing the choices a performer must make between killing a character or killing their true self, Jim and Andy offers invaluable insight into the agony of acting. It’s something writers and viewers often project onto the people they see on screen, but seldom has it been so bluntly and openly professed by a performer in their own words.

/Film rating: 8 out of 10

The post ‘Jim and Andy: The Great Beyond’ Review: A Revelatory Treasure Trove of Comedic Brilliance [TIFF] appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/man-on-the-moon-documentary-jim-and-andy-the-great-beyond-review-tiff-2017/