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MoviePass Partnering with Landmark Theatres for E-Ticketing, Advanced Screenings & More

Landmark Theatres MoviePass Deal

MoviePass is showing no signs of slowing down. Right now, the movie theater subscription service has a new deal offering an annual membership for just $6.95 a month, meaning plenty more subscribers will join the 2 million-plus users already taking advantage of the insanely good deal that allows them to see a movie every single day for a surprisingly small monthly fee. And now they’ve struck a new partnership deal with a nationwide movie theater chain.

Today, it was announced that MoviePass is partnering with Mark Cuban’s Landmark Theatres, known for their showcasing of arthouse and indie films, for a new deal that will give MoviePass members several advantages and benefits to keep them coming back again and again. Find out more about the Landmark Theatres MoviePass deal below.

Landmark Theatres will now have the MoviePass service integrated into their ticketing system. This will allow MoviePass subscribers to take advantage of features like e-ticketing, in-app seat selection and advanced screening reservations, which are all features that aren’t available at most theaters where MoviePass is accepted.

Not only is this a big deal for MoviePass, but it’s great news for the independent film market. Landmark Theatres is the largest movie theater chain dedicated to highlighting independent films. It’s one of the best places to catch festival-selected movies and awards fare. With 53 theaters spread across the United States (though not every state), having MoviePass in their corner should really help boost attendance for movies that normally struggle to find an audience.

This is What MoviePass Wants from Movie Theaters

For anyone who has been wondering how MoviePass plans to survive when they’re offering their services for a cost that is less than that of the average price of a single movie ticket, this is the answer.

MoviePass is building their subscriber base as much as possible to show movie theaters how much they can improve their attendance (and the numbers appear to prove that rather well). Then they’ll bring their numbers to movie theaters and show them how much traffic they can drive to the big screen on any given day. If theaters agree to offer certain benefits to MoviePass users, then they’ll strike a deal with that chain, presumably for a fraction of the ticket price from MoviePass users, or perhaps for a price that pays for MoviePass to promote specific Landmark screenings and titles.

Bernadette McCabe, Senior Vice President of Exhibitor Relations & Business Strategy at MoviePass had this to say about the new deal Landmark Theatres:

“Our relationship with Landmark represents another milestone achievement in our journey to enhancing the current movie theater ecosystem. It’s another step towards educating exhibitors on how we can work together in a mutually beneficial way to create a valuable and cost-effective experience for moviegoers.”

This deal will certainly help give MoviePass some leverage when the time comes to negotiate with other movie theater chains, but it’ll be their subscriber base that matters the most. Of course, they might have a hard time convincing certain chains to strike a deal with them, especially with AMC Theatres essentially declaring war on the service from the beginning.

It seems like being a MoviePass subscriber is only going to get better, at least when it comes to benefits for users. Hopefully, they continue to improve their customer service so those users can remain satisfied.

The post MoviePass Partnering with Landmark Theatres for E-Ticketing, Advanced Screenings & More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/landmark-theatres-moviepass-deal/

Film

MoviePass Partnering with Landmark Theatres for E-Ticketing, Advanced Screenings & More

Landmark Theatres MoviePass Deal

MoviePass is showing no signs of slowing down. Right now, the movie theater subscription service has a new deal offering an annual membership for just $6.95 a month, meaning plenty more subscribers will join the 2 million-plus users already taking advantage of the insanely good deal that allows them to see a movie every single day for a surprisingly small monthly fee. And now they’ve struck a new partnership deal with a nationwide movie theater chain.

Today, it was announced that MoviePass is partnering with Mark Cuban’s Landmark Theatres, known for their showcasing of arthouse and indie films, for a new deal that will give MoviePass members several advantages and benefits to keep them coming back again and again. Find out more about the Landmark Theatres MoviePass deal below.

Landmark Theatres will now have the MoviePass service integrated into their ticketing system. This will allow MoviePass subscribers to take advantage of features like e-ticketing, in-app seat selection and advanced screening reservations, which are all features that aren’t available at most theaters where MoviePass is accepted.

Not only is this a big deal for MoviePass, but it’s great news for the independent film market. Landmark Theatres is the largest movie theater chain dedicated to highlighting independent films. It’s one of the best places to catch festival-selected movies and awards fare. With 53 theaters spread across the United States (though not every state), having MoviePass in their corner should really help boost attendance for movies that normally struggle to find an audience.

This is What MoviePass Wants from Movie Theaters

For anyone who has been wondering how MoviePass plans to survive when they’re offering their services for a cost that is less than that of the average price of a single movie ticket, this is the answer.

MoviePass is building their subscriber base as much as possible to show movie theaters how much they can improve their attendance (and the numbers appear to prove that rather well). Then they’ll bring their numbers to movie theaters and show them how much traffic they can drive to the big screen on any given day. If theaters agree to offer certain benefits to MoviePass users, then they’ll strike a deal with that chain, presumably for a fraction of the ticket price from MoviePass users, or perhaps for a price that pays for MoviePass to promote specific Landmark screenings and titles.

Bernadette McCabe, Senior Vice President of Exhibitor Relations & Business Strategy at MoviePass had this to say about the new deal Landmark Theatres:

“Our relationship with Landmark represents another milestone achievement in our journey to enhancing the current movie theater ecosystem. It’s another step towards educating exhibitors on how we can work together in a mutually beneficial way to create a valuable and cost-effective experience for moviegoers.”

This deal will certainly help give MoviePass some leverage when the time comes to negotiate with other movie theater chains, but it’ll be their subscriber base that matters the most. Of course, they might have a hard time convincing certain chains to strike a deal with them, especially with AMC Theatres essentially declaring war on the service from the beginning.

It seems like being a MoviePass subscriber is only going to get better, at least when it comes to benefits for users. Hopefully, they continue to improve their customer service so those users can remain satisfied.

The post MoviePass Partnering with Landmark Theatres for E-Ticketing, Advanced Screenings & More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/landmark-theatres-moviepass-deal/

Film

Tommy Cruise is at It Again: ‘Mission: Impossible’ Star Leaps From Plane Because He’s Crazy, Awesome

mission impossible fallout stunt

That boy Tommy Cruise is at it again! Cruise, a stuntman who occasionally acts, decided to jump from a plane at 25,000 feet. Cruise claims he did this for the upcoming Mission: Impossible film, but we’re pretty sure he did it because he is an awesome crazy person. See the Mission: Impossible – Fallout stunt below.

Tom Cruise loves to risk his life for his movies. In the previous Mission: Impossible film, Mission: Impossible: Rogue Nation, Cruise held his breathe underwater for six minutes and hung off the side of a plane at 1,000 feet. Not one to sit back and rest on his laurels, Cruise has been pushing the stunts even further for the upcoming Mission: Impossible film, Mission: Impossible – Fallout. Cruise broke his ankle jumping off a goddamn building for this film, but that wasn’t enough. He also jumped out of an airplane. Because of course he did.

Fallout director Christopher McQuarrie shared a photo on Instagram of Cruise getting ready for his death-defying stunt. “Just one shot left. At 25,000 feet,” McQuarrie wrote. “At 200 mph. At dusk. Three minutes of available light. Two minutes of action. One chance per day.”

//www.instagram.com/embed.js

This isn’t the first time this stunt has come up. McQuarrie brought it up a few weeks ago (sort of) by posting these vague photos.

A post shared by Christopher McQuarrie (@christophermcquarrie) on

//www.instagram.com/embed.js

25K

A post shared by Christopher McQuarrie (@christophermcquarrie) on

//www.instagram.com/embed.js

Cruise got into the social media acton himself, sharing a photo of himself leaping out of the plane.

Dropping in. Summer ‘18. #MissionImpossibleFallout

A post shared by Tom Cruise (@tomcruise) on

//www.instagram.com/embed.js

Tommy Cruise, you so crazy.

This isn’t the only big, crazy stunt shared by the team behind Mission: Impossible – Fallout. Last month, a video of Cruise piloting a helicopter appeared online. Actually, let me clarify: Cruise doesn’t just pilot the chopper. He points it straight down at the earth and spins out of control during the descent.

I’m sure there are even more stunts in the film that we’ve let to learn about, and I’m sure they’ll all be equally crazy The Mission: Impossible film franchise has only ramped up its stunts since its humble beginnings as a rather subdued thriller helmed by Brian De Palma. And with the exception of Mission: Impossible 2, all the films have been quite good. I’m excited to see what happens with Fallout.

Mission: Impossible – Fallout opens July 27, 2018.

The best intentions often come back to haunt you.  MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – FALLOUT finds Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his IMF team (Alec Baldwin, Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames) along with some familiar allies (Rebecca Ferguson, Michelle Monaghan) in a race against time after a mission gone wrong. Henry Cavill, Angela Bassett, and Vanessa Kirby also join the dynamic cast with filmmaker Christopher McQuarrie returning to the helm.

The post Tommy Cruise is at It Again: ‘Mission: Impossible’ Star Leaps From Plane Because He’s Crazy, Awesome appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/new-mission-impossible-fallout-stunt/

Film

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi,’ 2017’s Surprise Blockbuster, and a Horror Cult Classic

New Blu-ray Releases

(Welcome to Not Dead Yet, a feature dedicated to new Blu-ray releases and what special features you should be excited about. Because yes, some of us still like to own physical copies of our movies.)

Hello, physical media fans. This week sees a big Blu-ray release: Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Below, I delve into nearly every special feature contained on the Blu, from making-of featurettes to deleted scenes. In addition to the Last Jedi Blu-ray review, you’ll get a look at new Blu-ray releases for Jumanji: Welcome to the JungleBehind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon, and this year’s Best Picture winner, The Shape of Water

Here are the new Blu-ray releases and their special features you should check out this week, and beyond.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi 

Time will be extremely kind to Rian Johnson‘s Star Wars: The Last Jedi. After J.J. Abrams revived the Star Wars franchise with The Force Awakens, there were several possible directions the franchise could go. Johnson, inexplicably, decided to go in a completely opposite direction than many people expected. Understandably, this caught fans completely off-guard – for better or worse. But the sheer unexpectedness of The Last Jedi is part of its strength. Rather than take the easy way out, and tell a story easily predicted by fan theories, Johnson opted to tell a complex story about failure, disappointment, and hope.

Mark Hamill‘s Luke Skywalker has become a bitter husk of a man – he shuns the galaxy, and wants no part of the Resistance. This comes as of much of a shock to Daisy Ridley‘s Rey as it does to the audience. Rey (and the fans) have a pre-conceived notion of Luke as a hero. “What did you think?” Luke asks. “You think I’m gonna walk out with a laser sword and take down the whole First Order?” There’s a cheekiness to this line – because by the film’s end, that’s exactly what Luke does.

Sort of.

Enough has been written about The Last Jedi at this point. I myself devoted thousands of words to an in-depth spoiler review, where I said, “Rian Johnson takes the saga to exciting, unexpected new places, and shows audiences that filmmaking within a big studio franchise need not be constricted, or travel down mundane paths.” So let me just mention a few choice elements that will continue to stay with me; that will continue to make me cherish this film.

  • Rey, someone who has spent her entire life on a dry, desert planet, taking a moment to catch the rain falling of the Millennium Falcon, a smile on her face.
  • Laura Dern‘s Holdo and her parting words to Leia: “May the Force be with you, always.”
  • Kelly Marie Tran‘s Rose, and the earnest, bitter way she delivers the line, “I wish I could put my fist through this whole lousy beautiful town.”
  • Comic relief Hux!
  • That red throne room fight – the best fight scene in the history of the franchise, like a fever dream hybrid of Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger and David Cronenberg.
  • Snoke’s suddenly, shocking, highly satisfying death.
  • Yoda giggling like a complete asshole after he sets the sacred library tree on fire.
  • Porgs. Glorious Porgs.

The Last Jedi: Peace and Purpose

The Last Jedi: The New Walker

The Last Jedi: World of White and Red

Special Features To Note:

The Last Jedi Blu-ray is packed with features, and almost all of them are a delight. The cream of the crop is the feature-length documentary The Director and the Jedi. In this very in-depth behind-the-scenes look at the film, we’re treated to a look at nearly every facet of the production. There’s footage of Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill rehearsing. There are several sections devoted to how much practical effects work was created for the film. There’s a tearful goodbye to Carrie Fisher. Most of all, though, there’s Rian Johnson, front-and-center. Johnson has received a lot of harsh online criticism from “fans”, but watching just a few minutes of The Director and the Jedi confirms how silly that is. It’s clear that Johnson loves this franchise, and was very committed to creating the best film he possibly could.

There are moments here where Johnson walks us through the more “controversial” elements of the film. He explains that it makes sense that Luke would throw away the lightsaber at the beginning of the film, because the whole reason he went to the island is to run away; he’s not going to instantly fire it up and say “Let’s go!” Johnson also talks about how disappointment is part of the story itself – how in our lives, we often expect certain people to live up to our expectations, and sometimes they don’t live up to them. He also mentions how Rose was written as a character who seems like she shouldn’t belong in a Star Wars film. So if you thought she seemed out of place – that was the point, folks. And that’s what’s so interesting about the character. There’s a lot to love in this doc, but my personal favorite moment was a quick shot of a real dog running around wearing a crystal fox costume. Johnson and company briefly considered using real pups in costume to play those creatures before settling on CGI.

Beyond The Director and the Jedi, there’s a featurette called “Balance of the Force”, which features Johnson explaining his reasoning behind The Last Jedi‘s story. “The Force is not a superpower,” Johnson says. He wanted the film to be a bit of a re-set lesson, especially for kids coming to these movies for the first time. The filmmaker goes on to talks about Luke in exile, saying the most selfless act for Luke can do is ignore the calls of help from his friends and lock himself off.

Johnson also says he feels that if Rey was told she was related to someone famous, it would be the “easiest thing” – it would instantly define her place in the universe. The more interesting answer is to learn she’s no one, and for her to have to find out who she is for herself. Johnson also explains the film’s iconic final shot of the stable boy on Canto Bight. As the director tells it, the ending scene proves that Luke hasn’t just saved a few dozen people in the resistance – he’s relit the spark of hope in the galaxy, and the story is spreading.

There are also several scene breakdowns that walk you through scenes from conception (i.e. concept art) to realization. A particularly fun feature is “Andy Serkis Live! (One Night Only)”, which provides a look at Andy Serkis’ motion-capture work for Snoke before the digital effects are in place. I’d honestly like to watch an entire cut of the movie like this, because even in a mo-cap suit, Serkis’ performance is riveting.

last jedi concept

Then, of course, there are the deleted scenes. The Last Jedi is the longest Star Wars film to date, but it was almost longer before Johnson trimmed some scenes. Thankfully, if you were curious about what was cut, it’s here! Here’s a quick and dirty breakdown of the Last Jedi deleted scenes.

  • An Alternate opening: instead of opening with the big space battle, we open with John Boyega’s Finn waking up from his coma. 
  • A quick scene with Rose’s sister Paige, where her guns jam during the opening battle.
  • Luke and Rey argue about Luke returning to help the Resistance. Luke says no, goes back into his hut, and mourns the loss of Han. There’s then a wonderful match-cut of Luke looking down in sorrow to Leia looking down in sorrow millions of miles across the galaxy.
  • A scene between Finn and Poe, with Poe updating Finn on what happened while he was unconscious. He gives Finn his old jacket, and reveals he sewed it for him (because they’re space boyfriends, and everyone knows it).
  • BB-8 shows Finn a recording from The Force Awakens of Rey saying “We’ll see each other again” to an unconscious Finn. Finn says to BB, “Okay that was kind of weird that you recorded that, but thank you.”
  • An additional scene where the Ahch-To caretakers (AKA the Fish Nuns) give Rey the stink-eye.
  • Luke’s “third lesson” sequence. Luke tells Rey that a raiding party is attacking the caretakers, and says a “true Jedi” would do nothing, adding: “Only act when you can maintain balance.” Rey ignores this, and runs off to help anyway. This results in the bad ass shot from the trailer of her running with her lightsaber fired up. Rey eventually breaks through a door only to discover the caretakers are actually having a big party. Luke catches up with her, and, laughing, tells her this was the lesson – that the resistance needs her, not him, some old husk. Rey is upset, saying she was wrong for believing in Luke.
  • Additional scenes of Finn and Rose’s big Fathier-riding escape from Canto Bight, including a scene featuring a weird, nude alien played by Warwick Davis.
  • An additional scene with Finn, DJ and Rose in uniform trying to infiltrate the First Order. Finn adjusts their uniforms so they look just right. They get paranoid that someone is noticing them and board an elevator, which backfires when a bunch of stormtroopers get on the elevator as well. One of the stormtroopers (played Tom Hardy!) recognizes Finn. Things get tense for a moment, until it’s revealed that the stormtrooper simply thinks Finn got a promotion. Apparently, rather than admit one of their own defected to the Resistance, the First Order made up an elaborate story about Finn being promoted to a higher rank.
  • After DJ’s big betrayal scene,  Rose drops her necklace. Hux picks it up and taunts Rose, saying: “You vermin may draw a little blood with a bite now and then, but we will always win.” In retaliation, Rose bites his hand.
  • An alternate (and better) death scene for Captain Phasma (watch it here!)
  • A quick scene with Finn and Rose aboard a ship.
  • An even quicker, jokier scene where Rey, flying the Falcon, sees the First Order firing upon the armored base door on Crait. “Let’s go around back,” she tells Chewie.
  • A lengthy compendium of shots showing off more aliens and sets from Canto Bight.

Special Features Include:

  • The Director and the Jedi – Go deep behind the scenes with writer-director Rian Johnson on an intimate and personal journey through the production of the movie—and experience what it’s like to helm a global franchise and cultural phenomenon.
  • Balance of the Force – Explore the mythology of the Force and why Rian Johnson chose to interpret its role in such a unique way.
  • Scene Breakdowns
    • Lighting the Spark: Creating the Space Battle – Get a close-up look at the epic space battle, from the sounds that help propel the action, through the practical and visual effects, to the characters who bring it all to life.
    • Snoke and Mirrors – Motion capture and Star Wars collide as the filmmakers take us through the detailed process of creating the movie’s malevolent master villain.
    • Showdown on Crait – Break down everything that went into creating the stunning world seen in the movie’s final confrontation, including the interplay between real-word locations and visual effects, reimagining the walkers, designing the crystal foxes, and much more.
  • Andy Serkis Live! (One Night Only) – Writer-director Rian Johnson presents two exclusive sequences from the movie featuring Andy Serkis’ riveting, raw on-set performance before his digital makeover into Snoke.
  • Deleted Scenes – With an introduction and optional commentary by writer-director Rian Johnson.
  • Audio Commentary – View the movie with in-depth feature audio commentary by writer-director Rian Johnson.

Continue Reading New Blu-ray Releases >>

The post New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi,’ 2017’s Surprise Blockbuster, and a Horror Cult Classic appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/new-blu-ray-releases-last-jedi/

Film

New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi,’ 2017’s Surprise Blockbuster, and a Horror Cult Classic

New Blu-ray Releases

(Welcome to Not Dead Yet, a feature dedicated to new Blu-ray releases and what special features you should be excited about. Because yes, some of us still like to own physical copies of our movies.)

Hello, physical media fans. This week sees a big Blu-ray release: Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Below, I delve into nearly every special feature contained on the Blu, from making-of featurettes to deleted scenes. In addition to the Last Jedi Blu-ray review, you’ll get a look at new Blu-ray releases for Jumanji: Welcome to the JungleBehind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon, and this year’s Best Picture winner, The Shape of Water

Here are the new Blu-ray releases and their special features you should check out this week, and beyond.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi 

Time will be extremely kind to Rian Johnson‘s Star Wars: The Last Jedi. After J.J. Abrams revived the Star Wars franchise with The Force Awakens, there were several possible directions the franchise could go. Johnson, inexplicably, decided to go in a completely opposite direction than many people expected. Understandably, this caught fans completely off-guard – for better or worse. But the sheer unexpectedness of The Last Jedi is part of its strength. Rather than take the easy way out, and tell a story easily predicted by fan theories, Johnson opted to tell a complex story about failure, disappointment, and hope.

Mark Hamill‘s Luke Skywalker has become a bitter husk of a man – he shuns the galaxy, and wants no part of the Resistance. This comes as of much of a shock to Daisy Ridley‘s Rey as it does to the audience. Rey (and the fans) have a pre-conceived notion of Luke as a hero. “What did you think?” Luke asks. “You think I’m gonna walk out with a laser sword and take down the whole First Order?” There’s a cheekiness to this line – because by the film’s end, that’s exactly what Luke does.

Sort of.

Enough has been written about The Last Jedi at this point. I myself devoted thousands of words to an in-depth spoiler review, where I said, “Rian Johnson takes the saga to exciting, unexpected new places, and shows audiences that filmmaking within a big studio franchise need not be constricted, or travel down mundane paths.” So let me just mention a few choice elements that will continue to stay with me; that will continue to make me cherish this film.

  • Rey, someone who has spent her entire life on a dry, desert planet, taking a moment to catch the rain falling of the Millennium Falcon, a smile on her face.
  • Laura Dern‘s Holdo and her parting words to Leia: “May the Force be with you, always.”
  • Kelly Marie Tran‘s Rose, and the earnest, bitter way she delivers the line, “I wish I could put my fist through this whole lousy beautiful town.”
  • Comic relief Hux!
  • That red throne room fight – the best fight scene in the history of the franchise, like a fever dream hybrid of Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger and David Cronenberg.
  • Snoke’s suddenly, shocking, highly satisfying death.
  • Yoda giggling like a complete asshole after he sets the sacred library tree on fire.
  • Porgs. Glorious Porgs.

The Last Jedi: Peace and Purpose

The Last Jedi: The New Walker

The Last Jedi: World of White and Red

Special Features To Note:

The Last Jedi Blu-ray is packed with features, and almost all of them are a delight. The cream of the crop is the feature-length documentary The Director and the Jedi. In this very in-depth behind-the-scenes look at the film, we’re treated to a look at nearly every facet of the production. There’s footage of Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill rehearsing. There are several sections devoted to how much practical effects work was created for the film. There’s a tearful goodbye to Carrie Fisher. Most of all, though, there’s Rian Johnson, front-and-center. Johnson has received a lot of harsh online criticism from “fans”, but watching just a few minutes of The Director and the Jedi confirms how silly that is. It’s clear that Johnson loves this franchise, and was very committed to creating the best film he possibly could.

There are moments here where Johnson walks us through the more “controversial” elements of the film. He explains that it makes sense that Luke would throw away the lightsaber at the beginning of the film, because the whole reason he went to the island is to run away; he’s not going to instantly fire it up and say “Let’s go!” Johnson also talks about how disappointment is part of the story itself – how in our lives, we often expect certain people to live up to our expectations, and sometimes they don’t live up to them. He also mentions how Rose was written as a character who seems like she shouldn’t belong in a Star Wars film. So if you thought she seemed out of place – that was the point, folks. And that’s what’s so interesting about the character. There’s a lot to love in this doc, but my personal favorite moment was a quick shot of a real dog running around wearing a crystal fox costume. Johnson and company briefly considered using real pups in costume to play those creatures before settling on CGI.

Beyond The Director and the Jedi, there’s a featurette called “Balance of the Force”, which features Johnson explaining his reasoning behind The Last Jedi‘s story. “The Force is not a superpower,” Johnson says. He wanted the film to be a bit of a re-set lesson, especially for kids coming to these movies for the first time. The filmmaker goes on to talks about Luke in exile, saying the most selfless act for Luke can do is ignore the calls of help from his friends and lock himself off.

Johnson also says he feels that if Rey was told she was related to someone famous, it would be the “easiest thing” – it would instantly define her place in the universe. The more interesting answer is to learn she’s no one, and for her to have to find out who she is for herself. Johnson also explains the film’s iconic final shot of the stable boy on Canto Bight. As the director tells it, the ending scene proves that Luke hasn’t just saved a few dozen people in the resistance – he’s relit the spark of hope in the galaxy, and the story is spreading.

There are also several scene breakdowns that walk you through scenes from conception (i.e. concept art) to realization. A particularly fun feature is “Andy Serkis Live! (One Night Only)”, which provides a look at Andy Serkis’ motion-capture work for Snoke before the digital effects are in place. I’d honestly like to watch an entire cut of the movie like this, because even in a mo-cap suit, Serkis’ performance is riveting.

last jedi concept

Then, of course, there are the deleted scenes. The Last Jedi is the longest Star Wars film to date, but it was almost longer before Johnson trimmed some scenes. Thankfully, if you were curious about what was cut, it’s here! Here’s a quick and dirty breakdown of the Last Jedi deleted scenes.

  • An Alternate opening: instead of opening with the big space battle, we open with John Boyega’s Finn waking up from his coma. 
  • A quick scene with Rose’s sister Paige, where her guns jam during the opening battle.
  • Luke and Rey argue about Luke returning to help the Resistance. Luke says no, goes back into his hut, and mourns the loss of Han. There’s then a wonderful match-cut of Luke looking down in sorrow to Leia looking down in sorrow millions of miles across the galaxy.
  • A scene between Finn and Poe, with Poe updating Finn on what happened while he was unconscious. He gives Finn his old jacket, and reveals he sewed it for him (because they’re space boyfriends, and everyone knows it).
  • BB-8 shows Finn a recording from The Force Awakens of Rey saying “We’ll see each other again” to an unconscious Finn. Finn says to BB, “Okay that was kind of weird that you recorded that, but thank you.”
  • An additional scene where the Ahch-To caretakers (AKA the Fish Nuns) give Rey the stink-eye.
  • Luke’s “third lesson” sequence. Luke tells Rey that a raiding party is attacking the caretakers, and says a “true Jedi” would do nothing, adding: “Only act when you can maintain balance.” Rey ignores this, and runs off to help anyway. This results in the bad ass shot from the trailer of her running with her lightsaber fired up. Rey eventually breaks through a door only to discover the caretakers are actually having a big party. Luke catches up with her, and, laughing, tells her this was the lesson – that the resistance needs her, not him, some old husk. Rey is upset, saying she was wrong for believing in Luke.
  • Additional scenes of Finn and Rose’s big Fathier-riding escape from Canto Bight, including a scene featuring a weird, nude alien played by Warwick Davis.
  • An additional scene with Finn, DJ and Rose in uniform trying to infiltrate the First Order. Finn adjusts their uniforms so they look just right. They get paranoid that someone is noticing them and board an elevator, which backfires when a bunch of stormtroopers get on the elevator as well. One of the stormtroopers (played Tom Hardy!) recognizes Finn. Things get tense for a moment, until it’s revealed that the stormtrooper simply thinks Finn got a promotion. Apparently, rather than admit one of their own defected to the Resistance, the First Order made up an elaborate story about Finn being promoted to a higher rank.
  • After DJ’s big betrayal scene,  Rose drops her necklace. Hux picks it up and taunts Rose, saying: “You vermin may draw a little blood with a bite now and then, but we will always win.” In retaliation, Rose bites his hand.
  • An alternate (and better) death scene for Captain Phasma (watch it here!)
  • A quick scene with Finn and Rose aboard a ship.
  • An even quicker, jokier scene where Rey, flying the Falcon, sees the First Order firing upon the armored base door on Crait. “Let’s go around back,” she tells Chewie.
  • A lengthy compendium of shots showing off more aliens and sets from Canto Bight.

Special Features Include:

  • The Director and the Jedi – Go deep behind the scenes with writer-director Rian Johnson on an intimate and personal journey through the production of the movie—and experience what it’s like to helm a global franchise and cultural phenomenon.
  • Balance of the Force – Explore the mythology of the Force and why Rian Johnson chose to interpret its role in such a unique way.
  • Scene Breakdowns
    • Lighting the Spark: Creating the Space Battle – Get a close-up look at the epic space battle, from the sounds that help propel the action, through the practical and visual effects, to the characters who bring it all to life.
    • Snoke and Mirrors – Motion capture and Star Wars collide as the filmmakers take us through the detailed process of creating the movie’s malevolent master villain.
    • Showdown on Crait – Break down everything that went into creating the stunning world seen in the movie’s final confrontation, including the interplay between real-word locations and visual effects, reimagining the walkers, designing the crystal foxes, and much more.
  • Andy Serkis Live! (One Night Only) – Writer-director Rian Johnson presents two exclusive sequences from the movie featuring Andy Serkis’ riveting, raw on-set performance before his digital makeover into Snoke.
  • Deleted Scenes – With an introduction and optional commentary by writer-director Rian Johnson.
  • Audio Commentary – View the movie with in-depth feature audio commentary by writer-director Rian Johnson.

Continue Reading New Blu-ray Releases >>

The post New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi,’ 2017’s Surprise Blockbuster, and a Horror Cult Classic appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/new-blu-ray-releases-last-jedi/

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‘The Cloverfield Paradox’ Went to Netflix Because Paramount Didn’t Want a Box Office Failure

Cloverfield Paradox Netflix Deal

While it’s usually the commercials that dominate water cooler chatter the day after the Super Bowl, this year, movie lovers had something else to talk about.

The Cloverfield Paradox, the third installment in what has become a makeshift sci-fi franchise featuring a series of vaguely connected stories from Bad Robot and Paramount Pictures, surprised everyone by debuting on Netflix immediately after the big game instead of coming to theaters in April as originally planned. It was a bold, innovative release strategy, but it seems the decision to catch everyone off guard with the movie’s release wasn’t based on shaking things up. Instead, the studio had little faith in the movie’s prospective performance at the box office.

Variety recently sat down with Andrew Gumpert after his first year as the COO of Paramount Pictures, and their discussion turned to the big decision the studio made to sell the distribution rights to The Cloverfield Paradox to Netflix. How did the decision come about? It’s not all that exciting, and it’s perhaps even a bit disappointing:

“The movie was finished, we all reviewed it together with J.J. and his team. We all decided there were things about it that made us have a pause about its commercial playability in the traditional matter.”

That means that Paramount didn’t see it as being a commercial success at the box office. Gumpert is vague about what exactly made them leery about giving the movie a theatrical release, but the reviews would indicate that it may have been a lack of faith in the quality of the movie. At the same time, the story itself does have some strange sci-fi elements like parallel dimensions and a confusing connection to the original Cloverfield movie, so maybe it was the story’s content that made them question commercial appeal.

Either way, Gumpert is happy with the decision, but maybe a little too confident about it. He says:

“There was an ability for us to be fiscally prudent and monetize. For fans of ‘Cloverfield,’ the fact is many, many more millions of people saw the movie. It’s a positive on every level.”

Sure, putting the Cloverfield movie on Netflix likely got more eyes on it in the first week of release than otherwise might have sought it out in theaters. But at the same time, I’m not sure it’s positive on every level. Though Paramount may have gotten a nice price for the distribution rights to The Cloverfield Paradox, fans walked away fairly disappointed in the movie. And now that we know Paramount didn’t see the movie as a commercial success, this feels all the more disappointing.

The Cloverfield Paradox being sent to Netflix isn’t quite the game changer that some thought it would be. If anything it just confirms a new place for studios to dump the movies they’re not confident in, adding to the library of movies Netflix have that seem to be nothing more than background noise.

The post ‘The Cloverfield Paradox’ Went to Netflix Because Paramount Didn’t Want a Box Office Failure appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal/

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Contest: Win a ‘Legion’ Mondo Poster and the First Season on Blu-ray

legion series premiere

Even as superheroes clash on the big screen on a regular basis, you’ll have to look to the small screen to find one of the best comic-book inspired tales out there. FX’s Legion is a remarkable television show, using the world of the X-Men to explore identity and mental illness while also being a downright bonkers visual trip while also being one hell of a superhero adventure. If you haven’t seen it, you’re missing out.

And this may be the perfect opportunity for you to catch up. The first season of this awesome show is available on Blu-ray and DVD today, but we have three copies of the Blu-ray and three copies of a new poster created by Mondo to give away to three lucky readers. Here’s how you can win.

Here’s what you do (and we’re keeping it simple): go to the comments section below this article and let us know what X-Men power you wish you had and how you would use it in real life. Three winners will be selected to receive the Blu-ray and the poster. We can only offer this to readers in the United States and Canada.

But now, check out the poster! The art is by Mondo regular Phantom City Creative and it depicts a vintage travel poster for Summerland, the mutant training facility and headquarters where Dan Stevens’ David Haller finds refuge in the series. I love how gloriously and intentionally mundane this art is, which makes the one surreal note (the flying figure!) all the more outrageous.

We are giving away three copies of the “Day” version, which is very limited and already sold out on Mondo’s site. The night version is still available for purchase at the time of this article’s publication.


Here are the specs for both posters:

LEGION: VISIT SUMMERLAND (Night) by Phantom City Creative
24″x36″ Screen Print, Edition of 200
Printed by D&L Screenprinting
$50
LEGION: VISIT SUMMERLAND (Day) by Phantom City Creative
24″x36″ Screen Print, Edition of 200
Only 75 copies available via mondotees.com
Printed by D&L Screenprinting
$50

In addition to the poster, winner will receive the first season of Legion on Blu-ray. Each set will come with a copy of “The World’s Angriest Boy in the World,” an awesome souvenir for anyone who is already familiar with the mythology of the series.


Here’s the complete list of special features included on the set:

  • Deleted Scenes
  • Fractured Reality: A Different Kind of Hero
  • Featurettes
    • Uncanny Romance
    • Production Design
    • Powers
    • Make-Up (Making the Devil with the Yellow Eyes)
    • Visual Effects
    • Costume Design
    • Location

If you aren’t selected as one of the three winners, don’t sweat. Legion season 1 is available for purchase right now on Blu-ray and DVD and fans of superhero tales and/or great TV should check it out.

Based on the based on the Marvel Comics by Chris Claremont and Bill Sienkiewicz and featuring a powerful, all-star cast — including DAN STEVENS, AUBREY PLAZA, JEAN SMART and RACHEL KELLER“LEGION” follows the story of David Haller (STEVENS), a troubled young man who may be more than human. Diagnosed as schizophrenic as a child, David has been in and out of mental hospitals for years. Institutionalized once again, David spends his time with his chatterbox friend Lenny (PLAZA), a fellow patient whose life-long drug and alcohol addiction has done nothing to quell her boundless optimism that her luck is about to change.  But a startling encounter with a new patient (KELLER) forces David to confront the shocking possibility that the voices he hears and the visions he sees may actually be real. A haunted man, David escapes from the hospital and with the help of a nurturing but demanding therapist (SMART) and her team of specialists’ unconventional methods, David embarks on an extraordinary journey of self-discovery that leads to a new world of possibilities…and a new level of unexpected danger.

The post Contest: Win a ‘Legion’ Mondo Poster and the First Season on Blu-ray appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/legion-mondo-contest/

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‘Avengers: Infinity War’ TV Spot: Teenaged Groot Has An Attitude

Avengers Infinity War TV spot

As he’s been depicted thus far in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Groot has been an emotionally pure, well-meaning, and protective talking alien tree. But after he sacrificed himself for the Guardians at the end of their first movie and spent all of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 as Baby Groot, the character has grown into a moody teenager. In a new Avengers: Infinity War TV spot, we see just how much he’s changed and get a look at Groot’s newfound attitude. The words “I am Groot” have never sounded so sarcastic.

Avengers Infinity War TV Spot

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That TV spot is full of a lot of footage we’ve already seen spread across the first two official trailers for the film, but the bit with the Guardians at the end is totally new. Mirroring scenarios every parent of the last 30 years has likely faced, Peter Quill is in the driver’s seat and wants Groot to quit playing video games in the back seat. But the temperamental teen responds sarcastically in the only words he knows, and even Rocket Raccoon is taken aback by what the teenaged tree says. “Whoa, language!” Rocket exclaims, recalling a running gag in Avengers: Age of Ultron in which Captain America takes umbrage with people swearing around him.

But my favorite part of this new footage is imagining Vin Diesel in a recording studio somewhere, having to hone in on the perfect amount of sarcasm when delivering his lines as teen Groot. What a mental image. For more on how the Guardians fit into the events of Infinity War, click here.

Avengers: Infinity War managed to secure one of the best casts in film history: Scarlett JohanssonJosh BrolinRobert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Tom Hiddleston, Chris Evans, Chris Hemsworth, Jeremy Renner, Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Olsen, Sebastian Stan, Benedict Cumberbatch, Paul Bettany, Samuel L. Jackson, Chadwick Boseman, Cobie Smulders, Benedict Wong, Zoe Saldana, Karen Gillan, Dave Bautista, Pom Klementieff, Don Cheadle, Tom Holland, Bradley Cooper, and Anthony Mackie.

As the Avengers and their allies have continued to protect the world from threats too large for any one hero to handle, a new danger has emerged from the cosmic shadows: Thanos. A despot of intergalactic infamy, his goal is to collect all six Infinity Stones, artifacts of unimaginable power, and use them to inflict his twisted will on all of reality. Everything the Avengers have fought for has led up to this moment – the fate of Earth and existence itself has never been more uncertain.

Avengers: Infinity War arrives in theaters on April 27, 2018.

The post ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ TV Spot: Teenaged Groot Has An Attitude appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/avengers-infinity-war-tv-spot/

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With ‘A.I.’ and ‘Minority Report,’ Steven Spielberg Redefined His Work for a New Century

A.I. and Minority Report

(Welcome to 21st Century Spielberg, an on-going column that examines the challenging, sometimes misunderstood 21st century filmography of one of our greatest living filmmakers, Steven Spielberg. First up: A.I. and Minority Report.)

“What if Peter Pan grew up?” pondered the tagline of Steven Spielberg’s 1991 fantasy Hook. It was an intriguing premise: what would happen if the perpetual child – the boy who refused to get older – embraced the cold, stark, finite nature of adulthood? Of course, the compelling concept of this tagline is all but forgotten in the runtime of Hook, where the adult Peter Pan quickly reverts to childhood in order to save the day. Still, what a notion!

Sometimes, life imitates art. In the 21st century, Steven Spielberg, the perpetual child – the pop culture impresario who found a way to turn childhood and nostalgia into a lucrative, highly entertaining art form – did something remarkable.

In the 21st century, Steven Spielberg grew up.

Spielberg Netflix

What If Peter Pan Grew Up?

One could argue that the experience of filming 1993’s Schindler’s List changed Spielberg. The overwhelmingly bleak subject matter took a toll on the director – he would return to his rented home from the set and literally break down sobbing. After the arduous experience of making the film, Spielberg would go on to say, “I feel I have a responsibility…I want to go back and forth from entertainment to socially conscious movies.”

Yet as the 21st century arrived, Spielberg’s filmography blossomed into something different. Rather than succumbing to the “back and forth” way of making movies – juggling between pure pop entertainment and socially conscious message movies – the filmmaker found a way to combine both. Here was something new from the most popular director in history. A brave new world of movies that walked a precarious tightrope; movies that sought to thrill and alarm. To entertain and challenge. The end result might just be the most interesting, most rewarding period of Spielberg’s entire career.

While he had his career ups and downs, box office success was never an issue for Spielberg. He invented the blockbuster, after all, with Jaws. But through his meteoric rise to become the most popular filmmaker in the history of medium, a fear of illegitimacy plagued the director. He may have trafficked primarily in pop, but he wanted to be taken seriously. Awards were important. Spielberg was so sure that Jaws would land him a Best Director Academy Award nomination that he hired a TV crew to come film him watch the nominations be announced. This plan backfired when Jaws ended up with a Best Picture nom, but not a nomination for Spielberg – something that clearly upset the wunderkind director. He wanted to be more than the king of the blockbuster. He wanted to be an artist.

And this longing was something his peers noticed – and exploited. In a 1976 Playboy interview, director Robert Altman observed, “I think Steven Spielberg will endure, though it’s tough when a picture like Jaws brings you a lot of success and money overnight that may not strictly be related to the merit of your work. I am not knocking Jaws, which was a magnificent accomplishment for a kid that age. But will he now be able to go off and make a small personal film?”

spielberg schindler's list set

In her New Yorker review of Spielberg’s first big screen directorial effort, The Sugarland Express, critic Pauline Kael wrote: “If there is such a thing as a movie sense — and I think there is, Spielberg really has it. But he may be so full of it that he doesn’t have much else. There’s no sign of the emergence of a new film artist…” Years later, Spielberg would admit he agreed with Kael. “She was right!” he enthusiastically says in Susan Lacy‘s HBO documentary Spielberg. “I hadn’t grown up yet.”

“People kept accusing me of trying to prove myself,” Spielberg said recently, reflecting on his career. “And they wouldn’t have been wrong. It was important for me to prove myself in genres that I wasn’t known for…I had only been making films for wide public consumption. There were other more – quote-unquote – adult stories that I wanted to tell. And the critics weren’t kind to me. I was moving outside of the box they had placed me in.”

Spielberg had peppered “adult” movies into his filmography before the 21st century. There was 1985’s The Color Purple, and 1987’s Empire of the Sun. After Schindler’s List, Spielberg returned to blockbusters with The Lost World: Jurassic Park, only to then create two adult-oriented dramas: Amistad and Saving Private Ryan.

Ryan was, perhaps, the first hint of what Spielberg’s 21st century filmography would become. It’s a grueling, hyper-violent, emotionally wrought war drama. But it’s also an exciting, entertaining action picture. It’s the live-action realization of the quote (often attributed by Roger Ebert to Francois Truffaut) that it’s nearly impossible to make an “anti-war” film, because movies make battle sequences look so exciting.

It wouldn’t be until the 2000s, though, that Spielberg really hit his stride combining entertainment and enlightenment. In the 21st century, he would go on to craft a roster of films that blended cerebral-ness with edge-of-your-seat thrills. There will always be a contingent that pines for the pure entertainment of Spielberg’s early films. Indeed, one of the primary selling-points of Spielberg’s Ready Player One seems to be that it’s a “return” of sorts for the director. A return to pure-pop; to mindless fun. To the Spielberg of old.

Yet to only long for this type of movie from Spielberg is to ignore the truly stunning work he’s created in the 2000s. While the films he’s crafted in the 21st century don’t always succeed, they are, without question, always interesting. And they are the summation of everything Spielberg had done up to this point. Over the course of several articles, we’ll plunge into Spielberg’s 21st century work, and reveal the movie magic lurking within.

Part 1: Back to the Future – A.I. Artificial Intelligence and Minority Report

 

AI David

Supertoys Last All Summer Long

“They made us too smart, too quick and too many. We are suffering for the mistakes they made because when the end comes, all that will be left is us.”

The filmography of Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick could not be more dissimilar. Spielberg is a humanist; a storyteller who retains his faith in humanity, no matter how terrible things may get. Kubrick, in contrast, crafted films loaded with cruel, detached irony. Spielberg is the type of filmmaker interested in stories about people who can, and will, save the world from total annihilation. Kubrick was happy to turn the mushroom-cloud laden destruction of the planet into a darkly comedic punchline.

This contrast in tone makes 2001’s A.I. Artificial Intelligence all the more curious. Here was Spielberg picking up where Kubrick left off, crafting a film that wasn’t quite Spielberg and wasn’t quite Kubrick, but something in between. This film is the sliver of green flora poking up from the radiated rubble of a bombed-out wasteland.

Kubrick had been trying to turn Brian Aldiss’ 1969 short story Supertoys Last All Summer Long into a film since at least 1976. The filmmaker would meet with Aldiss off and on over a period of years, all the way up until 1990, discussing ways to turn the story into a feature. For Kubrick, the one hindrance was technology. He wanted his Pinocchio-like tale of a robot boy struggling to be real to star an actual robot. A child actor simply would not do – Kubrick wanted something actually artificial to play artificial. Yet the cinematic technology simply was not there.

That changed in 1993, when Kubrick laid eyes on Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park. Kubrick and and Spielberg had been friends ever since Kubrick’s The Shining and Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark shared a set. In 1984, Kubrick told Spielberg about his dream of adapting Supertoys, and Spielberg in turn thought it would make a great film. After seeing Jurassic Park, Kubrick had a eureka moment. The film’s history-changing computerized dinosaurs convinced Kubrick that the time had finally come to create the artificial boy at the heart of Supertoys.

Yet even though Kubrick felt the time had finally come, he also seemed curiously ready to hand the project off to Spielberg. He told Spielberg in 1994, “I think this movie is closer to your sensibility than mine.” Soon after, the directors set up secret fax machines – direct lines to each other, in which they’d fax script pages back and forth. Just as those script pages went back and forth, so too would the directors themselves. Spielberg insisted Kubrick make the film while Kubrick insisted Spielberg should take the project off his hands. Hours and hours of behind-the-scenes pre-production work was done – storyboards, rewrites, test footage. Yet there was no real consensus on just who would direct the film that eventually became A.I. Artificial Intelligence.

That all changed in 1999. On March 7, 1999, Stanley Kubrick died suddenly of a massive heart attack. Spielberg was one of the people who gave a eulogy at Kubrick’s funeral. But he was already planning a much bigger tribute to the late director – he would finally make A.I. a reality.

Where does Kubrick’s influence on A.I. end and Spielberg’s begin? It’s an ultimately fruitless question, but one that still plagued audiences and cinephiles when A.I. hit theaters in June of 2001. Surely, some reasoned, the darker parts of the film must belong to Kubrick, and the lighter be the product of Spielberg. Surely the film’s “happy” ending was Spielberg’s idea, right?

Here’s the thing: the ending was actually Kubrick’s idea. Here’s another: the ending of A.I. isn’t actually “happy”, despite what some may think.

Continue Reading 21st Century Spielberg: A.I. and Minority Report >>

The post With ‘A.I.’ and ‘Minority Report,’ Steven Spielberg Redefined His Work for a New Century appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/spielberg-ai-and-minority-report/

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Javier Bardem to Star in ‘Cortes’ Miniseries from Steven Spielberg and Amazon

Nobody expects a Spanish conquistador miniseries.

But a miniseries about the legendary Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés developed by Steven Spielberg will soon be sailing to a small screen near you. Amazon has greenlit a Cortes miniseries and tapped Oscar-winning actor Javier Bardem to play the titular conquistador.

Amazon Studios has made a straight-to-series order for the four-hour Cortes miniseries from Amblin Television and Steven Spielberg, The Tracking Board reports based on an initial report from Deadline.

Created and written by Steven Zaillian (Schindler’s List), the Cortes miniseries will follow Hernán Cortes as he leads a “rebellious expedition” to King Montezuma II’s Aztec empire. Cortes was famous for bringing about the fall of the Aztec Empire and leading the first phase of the colonization of the Americas by Spanish conquistadors.

Sharon Yguado, Amazon’s head of scripted series, praised the A-list team behind the project, which Spielberg initially began developing as a potential feature film. Yguado said:

“Cortés’ epic discoveries shaped the world as we know it today, and through the minds of Amblin, Steven Spielberg, Steve Zaillian and Javier Bardem, we will bring Prime Video members on an exhilarating journey. There are few moments in history that shape an entire culture such as Cortés’ story, and this series will be one filled with drama and adventure.”

The project is based off a long-gestating script by the late Dalton Trumbo. Trumbo originally wrote the script (then known as Montezuma) in the 1960s, a decade after he was blacklisted as part of the Hollywood Ten at the height of McCarthyism paranoia. Montezuma explored the relationship between Cortes and the Aztec emperor Montezuma and was originally planned as reunion between Trumbo and his Spartacus star Kirk Douglas.

Spielberg revived the project in 2014 at DreamWorks with the intention to direct a script by Zaillian. Bardem was also his first choice to star. Now, Bardem will executive produce the series alongside Amblin TV’s Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey. Bardem said of the miniseries announcement:

“It is a privilege to tell this epic story— one that is full of drama and conflict within this huge, historical spectacle where two distant civilizations clash at the height of their reign. The best and worst of human nature came to life in all its light and darkness. As an actor, there is no better challenge than to serve such a unique project that I have been passionate about for years.”

Bardem’s casting finally brings the long stalled project back to life. An immensely talented and acclaimed star, Bardem lends the series even more credence, allowing Amazon to throw its full-fledged support behind it.

The post Javier Bardem to Star in ‘Cortes’ Miniseries from Steven Spielberg and Amazon appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/cortes-miniseries-from-steven-spielberg/

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‘All the Money in the World’ Exclusive Clip: What It’s Like to Work With Ridley Scott

all the money in the world clip

Ridley Scott is the consummate director.

It’s how he was able to rally together an eleventh-hour reshoot schedule to replace star Kevin Spacey with Christopher Plummer in All the Money in the World. It’s how he works non-stop despite being 80 years old, producing two movies and one TV show in the last year alone. And it’s how he got the entire cast of his historical thriller to gush about him in an exclusive new All The Money in the World clip from the film’s upcoming home video release.

All the Money in the World Clip

There’s no question that without Ridley Scott’s tenacity, All the Money in the World wouldn’t have pulled off its incredible recasting stunt. It was a feat of directing ingenuity. Scott reshot all of Spacey’s scenes with Plummer in nine days — one that earned Plummer a (well-deserved) Oscar nomination.

“He’s such a pro,” Plummer says in the clip that we’re premiering exclusively on /Film. “He knows exactly what he’s doing. He’s very much like the old-school directors along with Hitchcock and all those other guys who knew how they were going to cut the film before they were going to film it.”

Plummer joined the film late but ended up becoming All the Money in the World‘s strongest element — offering a wary, cynical performance that elevates the entire movie.

And of course, there’s Michelle Williams, who gives a raw, severely underrated performance as the embattled mother whose son is kidnapped. She, alongside her co-stars Mark Wahlberg, Romain Duris, and Charlie Plummer, all praise Scott as a legendary director worthy of his reputation in the clip.

Here are the special features that will be available in the All the Money in the World Blu-ray, DVD, and digital releases:

  • 8 Deleted Scenes
  • “Ridley Scott: Crafting a Historical Thriller” – Director Ridley Scott and the cast and crew discuss the fast-paced and exciting way he filmed this epic movie.
  • “Hostages to Fortune: The Cast” – A look into the award-winning actors and their connections to their real-world characters.
  • “Recast, Reshot, Reclaimed” – This piece follows the unprecedented recasting of the character J. Paul Getty a little over a month before the film’s theatrical release.

All the Money in the World will be available on digital platforms on March 27, 2018. It will hit Blu-ray and DVD on April 10, 2018.

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD follows the kidnapping of 16-year-old John Paul Getty III (Charlie Plummer) and the desperate attempt by his devoted mother Gail (Michelle Williams) to convince his billionaire grandfather (Christopher Plummer) to pay the ransom. When Getty Sr. refuses, Gail attempts to sway him as her son’s captors become increasingly volatile and brutal. With her son’s life in the balance, Gail and Getty’s advisor (Mark Wahlberg) become unlikely allies in the race against time that ultimately reveals the true and lasting value of love over money.

The post ‘All the Money in the World’ Exclusive Clip: What It’s Like to Work With Ridley Scott appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/exclusive-all-the-money-in-the-world-clip/

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‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Trailer: Enter Jack Black and Cate Blanchett’s Spooky House

Who’d have thought it would be Death Wish director and horror maestro Eli Roth who would be reviving that good ‘ol Steven Spielberg magic?

But he seems to be doing just that in the new fantasy-horror film The House with a Clock in Its Walls, an adaptation of a beloved, spine-tingling gothic children’s novel. And based on the first The House with a Clock in Its Walls trailer, the movie is rife with fantastical elements, awe-inspiring effects, and delightfully witchy performances from Jack Black and Cate Blanchett.

The House with a Clock in Its Walls Trailer

“Can you hear the ticking?”

With that creepy, childish whisper, The House with a Clock in Its Walls trailer kicks off a bewitching fantasy story about a young orphan named Lewis Barnavelt (Owen Vaccaro) who moves into his eccentric uncle’s (Black) home. But he finds more than just a few strange baubles and trinkets.

“Things are quite different here,” Uncle Barnavelt genially warns Lewis.

But that’s a bit of an understatement. Lewis finds a house that is a living, breathing being, with furniture, stained glass windows, and other elements coming to life before his eyes. And then there’s that mysterious ticking sound at the center of the house. Not to mention Cate Blanchett’s austere witch who lives next door.

Written by Supernatural creator Eric Kripke and based on the 1973 children’s book by author John Bellairs and illustrator Edward Gorey, The House with a Clock in Its Walls looks and feels like a classic Spielberg adventure movie. That may be because it hails from Spielberg’s longtime production company Amblin Entertainment, but it also feels like Roth taps into the childish wonder that Spielberg had mastered in movies like E.T. It also helps that both Black and Blanchett are well experienced in the family-friendly villain arena, skillfully straddling the line between campy and creepy.

The House with a Clock in Its Walls also stars Kyle McLachlan, Colleen Camp, Renée Elise Goldsberry, and newcomers Vanessa Anne Williams and Sunny Suljic.

The House with a Clock in Its Walls hits theaters on September 21, 2018.

In the tradition of Amblin classics where fantastical events occur in the most unexpected places, Jack Black and two-time Academy Award® winner Cate Blanchett star in THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS, from Amblin Entertainment. The magical adventure tells the spine-tingling tale of 10-year-old Lewis (Owen Vaccaro) who goes to live with his uncle in a creaky old house with a mysterious tick-tocking heart. But his new town’s sleepy façade jolts to life with a secret world of warlocks and witches when Lewis accidentally awakens the dead.

The post ‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Trailer: Enter Jack Black and Cate Blanchett’s Spooky House appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/the-house-with-a-clock-in-its-walls-trailer/

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‘The Terror’ Review: ‘Go For Broke’ Sets Sail for Doom and Gloom

The Terror Go For Broke Review

Welcome to our weekly recaps of AMC’s new historical horror show The Terror. This week’s The Terror review takes a look at the first chilling episode, “Go For Broke.” Spoilers follow.

Tell Them We Are Dead

A firm argument against ever leaving the house, The Terror sets sail this week on AMC, and brings with it a cavalcade of misery and unfortunate. And yet…it’s oddly entertaining? Usually such an exercise in hopelessness might have you running for the hills, but creator David Kajganich (working with executive producer Ridley Scott) has crafted something remarkable here. Part Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, part The Thing, part Alien, The Terror is a doomed expedition into highly watchable television.

Right from the start – thanks to history, Wikipedia, and a white-on-black title card – we know that things go terribly wrong for the characters of this show. “In 1845, two Royal Navy ships left England in an attempt to finally discover a navigable passage through the Arctic. They were the most technologically advanced ships of their day…” the first title card reads, before ominously changing to: “Then both ships vanished.”

Those two ships are the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, and in real life, every single member of the expedition perished. The deaths of the men were mostly due to poor planning, hubris and succumbing to the elements. The Terror, based on the novel by Dan Simmons, will use all that, and add something extra. Something…supernatural.

Episode one, “Go For Broke,” opens four years after the ships (and the men) have vanished. A Royal Naval officer is in search of the missing crew, and he speaks with an Inuit man, the last person to supposedly see members of the expedition alive. The officer lays out three portraits – portraits of the three missing expedition captains: John Franklin (Ciarán Hinds), Frances Crozier (Jared Harris) and James Fitzjames (Tobias Menzies). The Inuit man points to the Crozier photo – he recognizes him. When pressed about what happened to the missing men, the Inuit man says something cryptic about a “thing” made of “muscles and spells.” When pressed for more info, the Inuit man recounts that the last thing Crozier said was: “Tell those who come after us not to stay; the ships are gone, there’s no way through…Tell them we are gone; dead and gone.”

Cue the spooky music.

the terror episode 1

Icy Dead People

After the doom and gloom beginning, The Terror jumps back four years and finds that things are still pretty doomy and gloomy. Terror and Erebus sail through ice-clogged waters. Ever the optimist (with a little cluelessness thrown in for good measure), the expeditions figurehead commander, Sir John Franklin, isn’t too worried. Yes, summer is ending, and yes, winter is coming, which means even more ice. But Franklin is pretty sure they’re going to find their way through the Northwest Passage. Any day now.

Franklin is backed-up by the smug third in command, James Fitzjames, a blowhard prone to telling the same war stories over and over again. The second in command, Frances Crozier, however, isn’t so sure.

Crozier is melancholy to the extreme; a brooding, quiet, tired man who isn’t particularly good with people. He looks out at all that icy water and thinks only one thing: trouble. He has some good reason to be worried – the young expedition has already lost three men, and a crew member of the Terror – a young man named David Young – suddenly begins coughing up torrents of blood during supper.

As if that weren’t bad enough, the Erebus plows into some heavy ice, sending another sailor into the icy waters. The men are unable to save him, and he drowns rather quickly.

Despite all this, Fitzjames looks at Crozier and his moroseness with contempt. He tells Franklin that there’s nothing worse than a man who has “lost his joy.” Franklin, a magnanimous sort, shuts the criticism down. He doesn’t want anyone speaking ill of his second-in-command.

It’s determined rather quickly that the blood-coughing David Young has consumption. The expedition’s chief medical man, Dr. Stanley (Alistair Petrie), seems rather annoyed at the dying young man. Dr. Goodsir (Paul Ready), a lower-level doctor, is true to his name – he tries his best to provide comfort to the dying man. Comfort only goes so far, and David Young begins to succumb to his illness. Before he does, however, he spots something in the room with him – a truly terrifying specter that begins as a shape with a human body, and a mask that resembles a warped, abstract head. Eventually, the phantom morphs into an Inuit man, all while David looks on in horror. Then he’s gone, and Goodsir, who witnessed the man’s death (but not the mysterious figure in the room) is spooked.

Goodsir isn’t the only one with a sudden case of the heebie jeebies. Mr. Collins (Trystan Gravelle), another member of the crew, is suited up in a heavy diving suit and tasked with sinking into the icy water to knock some ice off of Erebus’ propeller. Once in the water, however, he spots the floating, frozen corpse of the man who had fallen overboard. This is the most eerie and most effective scene of “Go For Broke” – there’s something truly terrifying about the sight of this frozen, shadowy corpse drifting towards the camera like a slow-motion ghost.

After a grisly, sound-effect laden autopsy on David Young, the young man is buried on a nearby rocky island, and suffers one last indginity: the men lowering his coffin into the ground accidentally let it slip from their grasp, and the coffin lid bangs open once it hits the grave floor. Young’s cold, gray corpse is exposed, its blank face gazing up at nothing. The only man willing to jump into the grave and close the lid is Cornelius Hickey (Adam Nagaitis) – keep a sharp eye on this character, because he’ll have a much bigger part to play in this saga.

With winter fast closing in, the commanders of the expedition have to make a decision. Crozier, not mincing words, wants to sail around the eastern shore and possibly wait in a sheltered harbor until spring. He also wants everyone to abandon the Erebus, which is damaged from smacking into the ice. Franklin, drumming up his foolish optimism again, will hear none of it. “We are almost there!” he says yet again. Crozier cuts him off – it doesn’t matter how close they are. If the ships get caught in the ice, they’re screwed.

“This place wants us dead,” Crozier rasps. When Fitzjames accuses Crozier of being melodramatic, Crozier snaps: “There will be no melodramas here. Just live men or dead men.”

Despite this foreboding speech, Franklin decides to press on. And, wouldn’t you know it? Six days later, both ships are stuck in the ice. Things are about to get much worse for the men of the Terror and Erebus.

the terror go for broke

Go For Broke

“Go For Broke” is an exercise in atmosphere. This is a setup episode – it’s here to put all the pieces in place, so that future episodes can start ramping up the action. Yet “Go For Broke” isn’t something to simply shrug off and ignore. Right from the start, The Terror hooks you, with its icy cinematography and its general tone of hopeless doom. We know that all of these men will perish right from the start, and yet we still can’t help but become engrossed in their individual stories.

The cast are all exemplary, with Harris the standout as the brooding Crozier. Crozier is a man who doesn’t quite fit in, and Harris’ body language – tense shoulders, crossed arms, frequent downward glances – sell this splendidly. Hinds is also a treat as the eternally optimistic, eternally clueless Franklin. In real life, Franklin was merely a ceremonial captain – he had very little experience, especially compared to the lifelong seaman Crozier. Yet despite all this, Franklin exudes an air of confidence, and his men love him for it. As things go from bad to worse, however, they might have second thoughts about that love.

What’s truly remarkable about The Terror, and this episode in particular, is how masterfully it mounts tension and creates anxiety. There’s not a lot of action here – no jump scares, no loud, booming sounds, no overtly supernatural forces (not yet, at least). Yet there’s more dread, and more horror, in this first episode than most other horror shows can muster up in entire seasons. Take note, other horror TV shows – this is how you do it (casts a side-eye at another AMC show, The Walking Dead).

The post ‘The Terror’ Review: ‘Go For Broke’ Sets Sail for Doom and Gloom appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/the-terror-go-for-broke-review/

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These ‘A Quiet Place’ Clips and TV Spots Will Give You the Creeps

A Quiet Place clips

A whole slew of A Quiet Place clips and TV spots have arrived to give you the creeps. John Krasinski‘s horror film has already earned rave reviews out of SXSW, and from the intensity on display in these clips, it’s easy to see why. Watch the Quiet Place clips below.

I never thought I’d be excited to see a horror movie directed by Jim from The Office, and yet here we are. Life is strange! In A Quiet Place, “a family of four must navigate their lives in silence after mysterious creatures that hunt by sound threaten their survival. If they hear you, they hunt you.” The clips below are loaded with tension, and thankfully don’t give too much away.

A Quiet Place Clip: Bathtub 

In this clip, Emily Blunt enjoys a relaxing bath with a nice glass of wine. She lets the bubbles wash away the day, and unwinds while listening to some smooth jazz. Just kidding. She’s actually hiding in the tub while some unseen monster lurks just out of frame, all while Marco Beltrami’s score pounds away.

A Quiet Place Clip: Bridge

In this clip, Krasinski and Blunt are carrying their children across a bridge. Everything looks nice and tranquil – until one of the kids sets off a very loud toy. Needless to say, having a noisy toy in a world of monsters attracted to sound is a bad idea. Much running follows.

A Quiet Place Clip: Silo

This super-quick clip features Millicent Simmonds coming face-to-face with…something. Beware of jump scares.

A Quiet Place TV Spot

Now that the clips are out of the way, here’s a Quiet Place TV spot, featuring Scary Trailer Voice Guy and lots of pull-quotes, including one from /Film.

A Quiet Place TV Spot 2

Here’s one more TV spot. In this one, Scary Trailer Voice Guy says, “On April 6, stop talking.” Good advice!

Reviewing the film at SXSW for /Film, Meredith Borders wrote that A Quiet Place is a “majorly effective monster movie,” and added:

A Quiet Place is, above all else, really scary. Krasinki plays with tension in relentless waves, these cycles of fear and release, fear and release. So many of these recent contained horror films are all build-up and no pay-off, and A Quiet Place pays off again and again, with remarkable set pieces and long, unflinching looks at these arachnid beasts, their leathery, complicated physiques, endless caverns of teeth and giant, ghastly ears. The score is plaintive and mostly sparing, until the moments that our heroes are face to face with these horrifying creatures, and then it’s almost louder than we can stand.

A Quiet Place opens on April 6, 2018.

The post These ‘A Quiet Place’ Clips and TV Spots Will Give You the Creeps appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/a-quiet-place-tv-spots/

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Is ‘Isle of Dogs’ Cultural Appropriation or Homage?

isle of dogs cultural appropriation

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, political, and opinionated about anything and everything. In this edition: a writer grapples with her love of Wes Anderson and the question of Isle of Dogscultural appropriation.)

“I wish somebody spoke his language.”

Those droll words uttered by one of Isle of Dogs’ many English-speaking dogs, Duke (Jeff Goldblum), in response to Atari Kobayashi’s (Koyu Rankin) impassioned Japanese ramblings, get to the heart of what makes Wes Anderson’s stop-motion film so charming — and so troubling.

To be clear, the dogs aren’t actually speaking English. It’s part of the film’s overall idiosyncratic language: the dogs’ barks are transformed into Anderson’s signature wry American dialogue while the humans all speak an unintelligible language to hammer in how deeply we are in the perspective of said dogs. But as the film goes on, it becomes clear that this perspective is a flimsy excuse for Anderson to indulge in his quixotic vision of Japanese culture.

Isle of Dogs is Anderson’s latest feature film, and his second stop-motion effort. And like Fantastic Mr. Fox before it, Isle of Dogs is a visually dazzling, relentlessly twee film. But it has one big problem, as many critics of color have pointed out: it traffics in Japanese stereotypes.

From the very first shot, Anderson gleefully plays into a broad depiction of Japanese culture: sumo wrestlers, yakuza tattoos, sushi chefs, and Yoko Ono cameos abound. It’s a beautiful pastiche of every cultural curiosity that has crossed over to the west from Japan.

But wait, you might say, isn’t that what the line is poking fun at? In a way, it’s Wes Anderson’s classic tongue-in-cheek commentary about his own limited cultural perspective. Yes, and no.

The Wes Anderson of It All

I’m wading into the Isle of Dogs debate a few days after the initial uproar, as a conflicted Wes Anderson fan. Anderson is not known for his adherence to reality. His deadpan, eclectic dollhouse-style has become so recognizable that Anderson has become a genre unto his own. And Isle of Dogs is the epitome of that style – with a significant twist. Isle of Dogs is ostensibly Anderson’s love letter to Japanese culture, an homage to Japanese cinematic greats like Akira Kurosawa and Hayao Miyazaki.

“The movie is a fantasy, and I would never suggest that this is an accurate depiction of any particular Japan,” Anderson recently said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly. “This is definitely a reimagining of Japan through my experience of Japanese cinema.”

But it’s telling that Anderson’s supposed love letter to Japan is purely aesthetic. Isle of Dogs picks and chooses cultural artifacts and tropes from Japan, throwing them together in a mish-mash of feudal imagery, traditional woodblock prints, and inexplicable ’60s period costumes. For all of the production’s talk about reaching for authenticity by bringing on co-writer Kunichi Nomura, it doesn’t feel authentic to anything except for a Western invention of Japanese culture.

And therein lies the problem. It’s not the fact that Anderson deigned to pay homage to Japanese culture, or that his fairy tale version of Japan intentionally mocks or belittles the culture. It’s that his vision of Japan descends from a long history of cultural inventions that have historically insulted and mocked Asian characters.

Lost in Translation

I couldn’t write about Isle of Dogs without going back to one of the most beloved, most problematic recent cinematic classics: Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation.

Isle of Dogs and Lost in Translation have more in common than just a few shared Japanese references. Lost in Translation follows Bill Murray’s aging movie star and Scarlett Johansson’s aimless college graduate as they bond over shared alienation in Tokyo. It’s a lovely film about missed connections and miscommunication, with a few irksome drawbacks. Lost in Translation is replete with broad stereotypes of Japanese people that verge on racism: the frequent jokes about mixing the “l” and “r” sounds, jabs at the kookier elements of modern Japanese culture, the “otherness” of it all.

Unlike Isle of DogsLost in Translation doesn’t have the advantage of being based in a future fantasy world, but the sentiment is the same. Both films are heavily embedded in the POVs of its American protagonists. Yes, American — the dogs in Isle of Dogs may be Japanese, but when they speak with the Northeast American lilt of Edward Norton, they’re definitely coded to be American.

But perspective isn’t a strong enough reason to excuse the cartoonish depictions of Japanese culture and people. The “artistic vision” of Wes Anderson doesn’t elevate or separate Isle of Dogs from a long cinematic history of dehumanizing portrayals of Asian cultures that stretch back to Mickey Rooney’s yellowface performance as Mr. Yunioshi.

Besides, why should American perspectives be the default?

From the Other Side

Growing up, I never saw myself as “other.” I was one of the few Asian kids in my elementary school, and thought of myself as no different from my mostly white friends. Like them, I easily sympathized with the white superhero or protagonist du jour.

That changed over the years, as I became exposed to the hopelessly banal depictions of Asian characters and cultures in film. We weren’t the main character, we were the punch line. It was a stereotype that you couldn’t escape in either low-brow and “high-art” movies — from Long Duk Dong in Sixteen Candles to Linda Hunt’s Oscar-winning turn as a Chinese man in The Year of Living Dangerously. I realized that me and my fellow Asian-Americans would always be seen as the default “other” in film.

So it feels particularly odd that Isle of Dogs — which is set in Japan, features characters speaking in Japanese, and centers around a Japanese protagonist — would still be so otherizing. Atari Kobayashi (yes, named after the video game console) barely gets to be a real character before he’s sidelined by one of the few English-speaking humans of the movie. The majority of the spoken Japanese remains untranslated as part of the movie’s doggy POV — but that POV is quickly shed once Tracy Walker (Greta Gerwig) takes on the literal white savior role in the film.

I know Anderson doesn’t do it out of malice — if anything, he does it out of love for Japan. But every time he treats Japanese culture like a quixotic curiosity, it only gives more license for that one guy in my theater to guffaw whenever anything remotely Japanese was on screen. He laughed during the scene when a chef was cutting up sushi.

I don’t know if I would go so far as to call Isle of the Dogs appropriation. Nor is it a mockery. Instead, it’s more like a tone-deaf exercise in cultural tourism from a director that I still love. But I plan to hold him accountable.

The post Is ‘Isle of Dogs’ Cultural Appropriation or Homage? appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/isle-of-dogs-cultural-appropriation/

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Fox Pushes Back ‘X-Men: Dark Phoenix’ to 2019; ‘The New Mutants’ Delayed Six Months

fox release dates

X-Men: Dark Phoenix will rise a little later than anticipated. 20th Century Fox release dates have been reshuffled, pushing back the release of X-Men properties Dark Phoenix and The New Mutants to 2019.

In the place of X-Men: Dark Phoenix‘s November 2018 release date will be the Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody.

Fox pushed back the theatrical release dates of three of its upcoming major releases, Deadline reported late Monday night.

X-Men: Dark Phoenix, The New Mutants, and Bohemian Rhapsody were all bumped back a few months, with Bohemian Rhapsody taking Dark Phoenix‘s initial slot of November 2, 2018Dark Phoenix will now open on February 14, 2019, and The New Mutants has moved from February 2019 to August 2, 2019.

This is the second delay in so many months for New Mutants, the X-Men spin-off directed by Josh Boone and starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams, and Charlie Heaton. The film was originally slated for April 2018 but was pushed back to 2019.

2018 was supposed to be the X-Men’s big year. Coming off the critical failure and commercial disappointment that was X-Men: ApocalypseDark Phoenix is intended to be the creative revival of the core X-Men series, while New Mutants takes a new horror-inspired spin on the comic book franchise. But the cast and crew of New Mutants aren’t disappointed by the delays.

“I do think that there is a great responsibility to make sure the movie is done right and that we deliver the fans something that they can all feel happy about and excited about,” star Anya Taylor-Joy told The Playlist. “So, I don’t think it being delayed is a bad thing because it’s definitely more important to make sure that we get it right than rushing to make a date. So, hopefully, all of these reshoots and adding of the new character that will give the fans an altogether satisfactory, wonderful product.”

Meanwhile Bohemian Rhapsody, which once shared an X-Men connection with former director Bryan Singer, is likely getting delayed due to its troubled production. Singer was fired for “on-set drama” midway through production, with Dexter Fletcher taking over the biopic starring Rami Malek in December.

The show must go on, as a certain Queen singer once crooned. And you can look forward to these showings just a few months later than expected.

The post Fox Pushes Back ‘X-Men: Dark Phoenix’ to 2019; ‘The New Mutants’ Delayed Six Months appeared first on /Film.

from /Film http://www.slashfilm.com/fox-release-dates-x-men-dark-phoenix-new-mutants/