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Category: GAMES

GAMES 0

You Can Now Dress As Nier: Automata’s Main Character in Gravity Rush 2

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A new pack of free DLC costumes is now available for Gravity Rush 2. Like the Phantasy Star Online 2 set that released back in February, this particular costume pack is inspired by another major PS4 release: the Platinum-developed action RPG Nier: Automata. The new costume is based on the outfit worn by the game’s protagonist 2B and comes in two variants (with and without a visor).

The crossover outfit comes at a fitting time. Nier: Automata recently received its own DLC pack this past week: the bizarrely titled 3C3C1D119440927, which adds new items, music, and most famously, the CEOs of Platinum Games and Square Enix as bosses. The 3C3C1D119440927 content pack is available for both the PS4 and PC versions of the game and costs $14 to download.

If you’re not particularly fond of 2B’s look, you can also download the new Dark Angel costume at no cost.

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Gravity Rush 2 launched for PS4 this past January. The game was warmly received by critics on its release; we awarded it a 9/10 and called it “one of the best video game sequels in recent memory” in our review. For a limited time, PS Plus members can save 30% off the title and 40% off the PS4 remaster of the original Gravity Rush as part of the PlayStation Store’s Golden Week sale.

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/articles/you-can-now-dress-as-nier-automatas-main-character/1100-6449850/

GAMES 0

New Ark: Survival Evolved Update Out Now On PC, Here’s What It Adds

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The developer behind Ark: Survival Evolved continues to support the game with new content, and the most recent patch is a big one. Available now on PC, Update V257 adds gear, creatures, a cave, and a bunch of tweaks and changes. You can check out the trailer for the patch above.

The update is “one of the largest to date,” according to developer Studio Wildcard. Headlining the update are a number of changes to the game’s TEK Tier, sci-fi endgame content. Players can now create a TEK cloning chamber to clone creatures, a TEK saddle to ride Megalodons, a TEK turret that’s an enhanced auto-turret, and a TEK sticky grenade.

In addition, the update adds a high-level cave in an active volcano. By traveling to this cave, players can access the Ascension mechanic, another addition in this update. The Ascension mechanic is essentially a way of leveling up to make the game’s world more difficult. Players must beat every boss, complete the cave, and defeat a final boss to Ascend.

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Four new creatures are also added to the game. The Apis Lithohermaea is a giant bee which wields its stinger as its main weapon; the Kentrosaurus Aethiopicus looks like a smaller, more dangerous stegosaurus; the Liopleurodon Magicus grants luck if players can tame it; and the Daeodon Comedentis is described as a “Hell Pig.” You can see a gallery of the new creatures above.

A list of added features is below, and you can read the full patch notes here:

  • Structure: TEK Cloning Chamber
  • Structure: TEK Megalodon Saddle
  • Structure: TEK Turret
  • Weapon: Tek Grenade
  • TEK Cave and Volcano–The Volcano finally receives its long overdue, scorching redesign–and now leads to the entrance to the TEK Cave.
  • Ascension Game Progression
  • More UI overhauls
  • New Hairstyle and Facial Hair
  • Approximately 20+ New Explorer Notes
  • 15 new music tracks, per-biome and situational
  • Full console-style gamepad functionality (i.e. same as console versions)
  • Alpha Megalodon and APEX Loot for all Alpha creatures.

The patch is currently only available on PC, but the developer says that a version for PS4 and Xbox One is coming soon. You can read about the details of the previous patch, which was another substantial content update, here.

Although the game has done well on PC and consoles, it doesn’t look it’ll be released on Nintendo Switch any time soon. The developer said in February: “We don’t have any current plans for the Nintendo Switch, though I will be closely watching how that console does in its launch.”

List of new features :

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/articles/new-ark-survival-evolved-update-out-now-on-pc-here/1100-6449851/

GAMES 0

Analyst:Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Isn’t Any Ordinary Success But A MegaHit on A Different Scale Altogether

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According to an equity analyst, the scale of Mario Kart 8 Deluxe’s success is well beyond even Mario Kart Wii’s one.

He also believes that Nintendo will easily outperform their conservative estimate of 10 million Switch units sold in the next fiscal year.

Vía http://n4g.com/news/2053593/analyst-mario-kart-8-deluxe-isnt-any-ordinary-success-but-a-megahit-on-a-different-scale-altogether

GAMES 0

Special Pokemon For Sun And Moon Available At GameStop This Month

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Pokemon Sun and Moon players will soon be able to add a special Midnight Form Lycanroc to their teams. GameStop is distributing the Rock-type Pokemon via a serial code at select stores across the US. The distribution runs from May 15 to June 5.

What sets this Lycanroc apart from the ones you can capture within the games is its Hidden Ability, No Guard, which ensures that every move executed in battle (by both you and your opponent) hits its target. Lycanroc also comes equipped with a Life Orb, which boosts its damage output at the expense of a little health every turn, and knows the following moves:

  • Stone Edge
  • Fire Fang
  • Sucker Punch
  • Swords Dance

To download the Pokemon, select the Mystery Gift option from the menu screen and choose to receive your gift via a code. After inputting the code, you can collect your new Lycanroc from the deliveryman within any of the games’ Pokemon Centers.

The distribution coincides with the release of the second Sun and Moon expansion for Pokemon TCG, Guardians Rising, which is available in stores now. The expansion adds 169 new cards to the game, including 12 new Pokemon-GX cards.

Pokemon Sun and Moon are the fast-selling installments in the series’ history, selling over 14 million copies within their first two months.

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/articles/special-pokemon-for-sun-and-moon-available-at-game/1100-6449847/

GAMES 0

Up To 80% Off Digital Sale For PS4/PS3/X1/PSV On Amazon

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My shelves are filled. My wife is constantly asking me if I’m going to play certain games anymore, and of course, the answer is yes. So I’ve gone to digital copies lately because she has yet to come up to me with my hard drive and ask me if I’m playing the games in it. If this sounds like a struggle you go through, you should check out Amazon’s digital sale.

Vía http://n4g.com/news/2053596/up-to-80-off-digital-sale-for-ps4-ps3-x1-psv-on-amazon

GAMES 0

Making Games At Marvel: An Interview About Spoilers, VR, And Storytelling

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2017 is already a big year for Marvel. This weekend, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 opened in theaters. On the TV side, teasers for the Inhumans show started to come out. And of course, on games, we have had Telltale’s Guardians of the Galaxy, Marvel Heroes Omega‘s beta, and a full slate of mobile titles.

With so much happening in the wide-reaching world of Marvel, we sat down with Jay Ong, the senior vice president of games and innovation at Marvel, to discuss the studio’s role in game creation, the future of VR, and the secretive world of game codenames.

GameSpot: From your position at Marvel Games, how much insight do you have into the broader Marvel world? Like, how closely do the different teams work together? Marvel creates these expansive story universes, and you don’t want to spoil anything by letting details leak too early, but you also have to share content across different groups.

Jay Ong: We have great relationships with all the different business units that create that new IP. On the film side, TV, animation, comics–there’s quite a bit of coordination and communication. We don’t want to spoil things for the other businesses–that’s off limits–but in terms of drawing inspiration from and helping contribute to one another, it’s actually designed to feed both ways. So, some of what we’re creating feeds into the other parts of the business, including on the comic side and things like that.

We have to be careful in terms of avoiding spoilers, like you said, but there’s still a lot of coordination.

Jay Ong
Jay Ong

Do you see Marvel Games as more of a support unit, or does it also stand alone in the creation of the Marvel canon?

We’re absolutely stand alone. When I started at Marvel, there was this chance to reboot the business; to start from scratch. One of the key pillars we strived for was to use our games as a driver of the brand, certainly, and as a creator of original IP. So we strive very hard to make sure our games have really cool storylines that are wholly original.

Our executive creative director, he’s from the comic book side of the business, and he’s an incredible storyteller. He understands how the sauce is made, so to speak, and he collaborates with our partners to make sure that the stories are interesting, original, authentically Marvel, and unique to our games. That’s on the story side.

You know, Spider-man’s costume in the [2017 Spider-Man] game, for instance, is original, right? It’s neither the theatrical costume nor is it from the comic books. The white spider design is totally original. We’ve come a long way. I think we used to be a support unit; now we’re big, not as big as theatrical or TV, but we’re growing.

Of course, not announcing anything, but with TV as an example: They’re able to take a lot of liberties and create their own characters, create their own stories. Do you think games can get to the point where you get to tell your own wholly original stories?

Yes. And really, we’re already doing that to some degree. For brand new characters, we’ve worked with some of our partners, and we’ve already done that, and you can see that in our work with Kabam. And all of our games have original stories. Now if we’re talking about brand new universe and something that’s never been seen before from the ground up, that day’ll come…possibly. It’s hard to say [laughs].

Marvel works with a wide variety of developers like Kabam, Square Enix. How do you decide who those partners are going to be? Do they come to you or do you reach out to studios you love?

It works both ways. We’re not fixated on any particular methodology, but as far as picking who to work with, it’s actually pretty straightforward. We look for a few things; first and foremost we look for talent. We have incredible ambition about what kind of games we want to do, and the equation’s very simple. You need a super-talented team to create these unforgettable games.

Spider-man's new video game costume.
Spider-man’s new video game costume.

The second thing we look for is: “Do they have passion for our IP?” Talent without passion is just going to go through the motions. So they need passion for our IP. Then after that we look for an investment, in terms of how much time, talent, and assets they’re going to devote to creating this thing. Do they share our ambition for doing something truly grand? Lastly is the timing; does the timing work? Sometimes the teams are busy on something else. The stars, to some extent, have to align properly.

As far as how the process works, we do reach out to certain teams that we want to work with, because we think that the talent level would be an incredibe fit for some of the things we want do. And we also get developers asking us. Sometimes it’s as simple as meeting each other at DICE or GDC and just saying, “Hi. How’re you doing?” And then it goes from there.

Thinking about Marvel games historically, for a long time we’ve gotten a lot of very action-focused titles. It’s kind of like early comic books. The medium has matured, and now we see stuff like Guardians of the Galaxy going into the adventure game realm. But do you think there’s a place for all the different kinds of Marvel comics to live in a video game? Or are there some that might only really work for theatrical or for TV, or some that can only be comics?

There are so many different types of games, right? We’re looking at not just console and mobile, but VR, as well. The possibilities are practically without limits, so I don’t see any limitations. I would say, in some ways, games are more flexible than film or TV in terms of being able to tell amazingly different stories. Some games might be more story driven, such as Telltale, others more action driven like you mentioned earlier. There’s an opportunity there to do some pretty crazy things.

I would say, in some ways, games are more flexible than film or TV in terms of being able to tell amazingly different stories.

Of course, none of your titles are announced as specifically for virtual reality, but thinking about that tech from a Marvel Games perspectives, do you think VR has potential?

Absolutely. In fact, we did a deep dive in looking at the space towards the end of last year, and it offers some pretty incredible opportunities, in terms of delivering really cool experiences. We can’t say anything yet, but believe me, we’re not shying away from it.

When do you think we’re going to hear more about these things? Will it be around E3, or later?

[Long pause]. Soon. [laughs] There are absolutely things in the works, but we’re just not quite ready to announce them yet.

What is the Marvel Games ethos? It’s an interesting system that you guys have, and it’s similar to Disney itself. They used to create games through in-house studios, and they’ve also shifted toward a partner-focused structure.

The way we’ve constructed our business is around partnerships and licensing, to use the technical terms, but we see ourselves as creative collaborators. With each of our partners we work in creative collaboration, on one side, in terms of helping them maximize use of our IP. On the other side, on a macro level, we’re curators of a portfolio. It’s our job to think about what our fans want. What would delight them? What would make them think about and be able to experience this the way we talked about it? And how can we deliver this portfolio of games to them, making sure each game is different enough from the others, and that they all provide very satisfying experiences without too much overlap?

Those are the main two chunks of our job. One is curation of this portfolio and assembling this package together over time. And these things take a long time; we announced some of our current projects two years ago, and there are many announcements to come. But that’s part of our job: putting the portfolio together. And obviously all the deals and all the partnerships.

Once the deals are done, then the creative process begins, and it’s very collaborative. [Insomniac Games CEO] Ted Price is amazing. His team’s amazing. They happen to be 10 minutes away from us, believe it or not, just by pure happenstance. So we’re over in their offices all the time. They ask us to come because we collaborate on things like storylines, and character selection, and art style, and all sorts of things that it takes to put together amazing games.

And the definition of what defines a game continues to change and grow. Mobile gamers don’t always consider themselves gamers, even if they spend hours everyday playing. And a lot of Disney theme park attractions are games. go to like Disneyland, and those are games. But that’s a completely different team, right? The Imagineers that create those attractions and rides at Disney, even though they’re not necessarily “game designers” in the exact same way, do you work with them to craft those Marvel-themed experiences?

There’s actually a separate team at Marvel whose job it is to do exactly that. They’re the rides and attractions team, and they’re right down the hallway from me. They work with an Imagineering team on things like the new Guardians of the Galaxy ride that opened up at Disneyland. The teams worked very closely together on it in terms of, “Here’s our IP and here’s how to maximize it.”

I could give you a hint. All of our games’ code names are named after food items.

It’s somewhat similar to what we do, but on the theme park and rides side. They do lots of different types of attractions. Once in a while they’ll ask us for assistance, if it’s something that’s very gaming-focused, and we’re happy to help, but it’s something that that other team drives.

Are you ever afraid of accidentally slipping something out that you’re not supposed to, like when talking with friends or maybe after having too too many drinks?

It’s always a danger, right, and that’s why I have PR sitting around for interviews. She’ll probably throw her phone at me if I start to say something I shouldn’t. [laughs]

But a lot of times, internally, we use code names. So if something accidentally does slip out, it wouldn’t make sense to anyone anyway. And for all the TV shows, all the movies, we use code names. Even our games, within our team, we use code names.

Can you tell us any of the code names for stuff that’s already come out?

No.

Aww.

I could give you a hint. All of our games’ code names are named after food items. Different snack food items. It’s just funny that they’re this common theme. I used to work at Blizzard and the code names there were named after mythological creatures, but we were like, “You know, we don’t want something too grandiose. We want to keep it simple.” We all like to eat, and so literally every single game I saw on the screen has a code name that’s related to food in some way.

We know a lot about the movie plans for the next few years, but what else can we look forward to on the games side?

It’s going to be exciting here. Absolutely expect some announcements in VR, that’s something we’re really excited about. I think our fans are going to go crazy. The things we’re doing there are absolutely amazing.

We see VR in the same way we see the other platforms in terms of if you want to do something, you need to do something truly amazing. One of the things about our team, and we talked about our team ethos earlier, is that we have almost irrational ambition. It’s true. When I first started at Marvel, going back to 2014, the things we were dreaming about back then were almost crazy. We wanted to do these amazing console games, we wanted to do these amazing chart topping mobile games; it was irrational and crazy, but we dreamed and it actually worked because the IP is really strong. And we got lucky with a few things happening the right way at the right time.

In VR, we have that same ambition. We think if we do something there, it shouldn’t be just for the novelty of it. It should be something that defines the platform, that defines the experience. Certainly we’re looking to build when Spider-man comes out, it’ll be one of the best games on the platform, and when Avengers comes out, it’ll be one of the best games on those platforms. We think our efforts in VR will be the same thing.

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/articles/making-games-at-marvel-an-interview-about-spoilers/1100-6449845/

GAMES 0

Making Games At Marvel: An Interview About Spoilers, VR, And Storytelling

https://static.gamespot.com/uploads/scale_small/1534/15343359/3229729-jay_ong_picture%5B1%5D.jpg

2017 is already a big year for Marvel. This weekend, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 opened in theaters. On the TV side, teasers for the Inhumans show started to come out. And of course, on games, we have had Telltale’s Guardians of the Galaxy, Marvel Heroes Omega‘s beta, and a full slate of mobile titles.

With so much happening in the wide-reaching world of Marvel, we sat down with Jay Ong, the senior vice president of games and innovation at Marvel, to discuss the studio’s role in game creation, the future of VR, and the secretive world of game codenames.

GameSpot: From your position at Marvel Games, how much insight do you have into the broader Marvel world? Like, how closely do the different teams work together? Marvel creates these expansive story universes, and you don’t want to spoil anything by letting details leak too early, but you also have to share content across different groups.

Jay Ong: We have great relationships with all the different business units that create that new IP. On the film side, TV, animation, comics–there’s quite a bit of coordination and communication. We don’t want to spoil things for the other businesses–that’s off limits–but in terms of drawing inspiration from and helping contribute to one another, it’s actually designed to feed both ways. So, some of what we’re creating feeds into the other parts of the business, including on the comic side and things like that.

We have to be careful in terms of avoiding spoilers, like you said, but there’s still a lot of coordination.

Jay Ong
Jay Ong

Do you see Marvel Games as more of a support unit, or does it also stand alone in the creation of the Marvel canon?

We’re absolutely stand alone. When I started at Marvel, there was this chance to reboot the business; to start from scratch. One of the key pillars we strived for was to use our games as a driver of the brand, certainly, and as a creator of original IP. So we strive very hard to make sure our games have really cool storylines that are wholly original.

Our executive creative director, he’s from the comic book side of the business, and he’s an incredible storyteller. He understands how the sauce is made, so to speak, and he collaborates with our partners to make sure that the stories are interesting, original, authentically Marvel, and unique to our games. That’s on the story side.

You know, Spider-man’s costume in the [2017 Spider-Man] game, for instance, is original, right? It’s neither the theatrical costume nor is it from the comic books. The white spider design is totally original. We’ve come a long way. I think we used to be a support unit; now we’re big, not as big as theatrical or TV, but we’re growing.

Of course, not announcing anything, but with TV as an example: They’re able to take a lot of liberties and create their own characters, create their own stories. Do you think games can get to the point where you get to tell your own wholly original stories?

Yes. And really, we’re already doing that to some degree. For brand new characters, we’ve worked with some of our partners, and we’ve already done that, and you can see that in our work with Kabam. And all of our games have original stories. Now if we’re talking about brand new universe and something that’s never been seen before from the ground up, that day’ll come…possibly. It’s hard to say [laughs].

Marvel works with a wide variety of developers like Kabam, Square Enix. How do you decide who those partners are going to be? Do they come to you or do you reach out to studios you love?

It works both ways. We’re not fixated on any particular methodology, but as far as picking who to work with, it’s actually pretty straightforward. We look for a few things; first and foremost we look for talent. We have incredible ambition about what kind of games we want to do, and the equation’s very simple. You need a super-talented team to create these unforgettable games.

Spider-man's new video game costume.
Spider-man’s new video game costume.

The second thing we look for is: “Do they have passion for our IP?” Talent without passion is just going to go through the motions. So they need passion for our IP. Then after that we look for an investment, in terms of how much time, talent, and assets they’re going to devote to creating this thing. Do they share our ambition for doing something truly grand? Lastly is the timing; does the timing work? Sometimes the teams are busy on something else. The stars, to some extent, have to align properly.

As far as how the process works, we do reach out to certain teams that we want to work with, because we think that the talent level would be an incredibe fit for some of the things we want do. And we also get developers asking us. Sometimes it’s as simple as meeting each other at DICE or GDC and just saying, “Hi. How’re you doing?” And then it goes from there.

Thinking about Marvel games historically, for a long time we’ve gotten a lot of very action-focused titles. It’s kind of like early comic books. The medium has matured, and now we see stuff like Guardians of the Galaxy going into the adventure game realm. But do you think there’s a place for all the different kinds of Marvel comics to live in a video game? Or are there some that might only really work for theatrical or for TV, or some that can only be comics?

There are so many different types of games, right? We’re looking at not just console and mobile, but VR, as well. The possibilities are practically without limits, so I don’t see any limitations. I would say, in some ways, games are more flexible than film or TV in terms of being able to tell amazingly different stories. Some games might be more story driven, such as Telltale, others more action driven like you mentioned earlier. There’s an opportunity there to do some pretty crazy things.

I would say, in some ways, games are more flexible than film or TV in terms of being able to tell amazingly different stories.

Of course, none of your titles are announced as specifically for virtual reality, but thinking about that tech from a Marvel Games perspectives, do you think VR has potential?

Absolutely. In fact, we did a deep dive in looking at the space towards the end of last year, and it offers some pretty incredible opportunities, in terms of delivering really cool experiences. We can’t say anything yet, but believe me, we’re not shying away from it.

When do you think we’re going to hear more about these things? Will it be around E3, or later?

[Long pause]. Soon. [laughs] There are absolutely things in the works, but we’re just not quite ready to announce them yet.

What is the Marvel Games ethos? It’s an interesting system that you guys have, and it’s similar to Disney itself. They used to create games through in-house studios, and they’ve also shifted toward a partner-focused structure.

The way we’ve constructed our business is around partnerships and licensing, to use the technical terms, but we see ourselves as creative collaborators. With each of our partners we work in creative collaboration, on one side, in terms of helping them maximize use of our IP. On the other side, on a macro level, we’re curators of a portfolio. It’s our job to think about what our fans want. What would delight them? What would make them think about and be able to experience this the way we talked about it? And how can we deliver this portfolio of games to them, making sure each game is different enough from the others, and that they all provide very satisfying experiences without too much overlap?

Those are the main two chunks of our job. One is curation of this portfolio and assembling this package together over time. And these things take a long time; we announced some of our current projects two years ago, and there are many announcements to come. But that’s part of our job: putting the portfolio together. And obviously all the deals and all the partnerships.

Once the deals are done, then the creative process begins, and it’s very collaborative. [Insomniac Games CEO] Ted Price is amazing. His team’s amazing. They happen to be 10 minutes away from us, believe it or not, just by pure happenstance. So we’re over in their offices all the time. They ask us to come because we collaborate on things like storylines, and character selection, and art style, and all sorts of things that it takes to put together amazing games.

And the definition of what defines a game continues to change and grow. Mobile gamers don’t always consider themselves gamers, even if they spend hours everyday playing. And a lot of Disney theme park attractions are games. go to like Disneyland, and those are games. But that’s a completely different team, right? The Imagineers that create those attractions and rides at Disney, even though they’re not necessarily “game designers” in the exact same way, do you work with them to craft those Marvel-themed experiences?

There’s actually a separate team at Marvel whose job it is to do exactly that. They’re the rides and attractions team, and they’re right down the hallway from me. They work with an Imagineering team on things like the new Guardians of the Galaxy ride that opened up at Disneyland. The teams worked very closely together on it in terms of, “Here’s our IP and here’s how to maximize it.”

I could give you a hint. All of our games’ code names are named after food items.

It’s somewhat similar to what we do, but on the theme park and rides side. They do lots of different types of attractions. Once in a while they’ll ask us for assistance, if it’s something that’s very gaming-focused, and we’re happy to help, but it’s something that that other team drives.

Are you ever afraid of accidentally slipping something out that you’re not supposed to, like when talking with friends or maybe after having too too many drinks?

It’s always a danger, right, and that’s why I have PR sitting around for interviews. She’ll probably throw her phone at me if I start to say something I shouldn’t. [laughs]

But a lot of times, internally, we use code names. So if something accidentally does slip out, it wouldn’t make sense to anyone anyway. And for all the TV shows, all the movies, we use code names. Even our games, within our team, we use code names.

Can you tell us any of the code names for stuff that’s already come out?

No.

Aww.

I could give you a hint. All of our games’ code names are named after food items. Different snack food items. It’s just funny that they’re this common theme. I used to work at Blizzard and the code names there were named after mythological creatures, but we were like, “You know, we don’t want something too grandiose. We want to keep it simple.” We all like to eat, and so literally every single game I saw on the screen has a code name that’s related to food in some way.

We know a lot about the movie plans for the next few years, but what else can we look forward to on the games side?

It’s going to be exciting here. Absolutely expect some announcements in VR, that’s something we’re really excited about. I think our fans are going to go crazy. The things we’re doing there are absolutely amazing.

We see VR in the same way we see the other platforms in terms of if you want to do something, you need to do something truly amazing. One of the things about our team, and we talked about our team ethos earlier, is that we have almost irrational ambition. It’s true. When I first started at Marvel, going back to 2014, the things we were dreaming about back then were almost crazy. We wanted to do these amazing console games, we wanted to do these amazing chart topping mobile games; it was irrational and crazy, but we dreamed and it actually worked because the IP is really strong. And we got lucky with a few things happening the right way at the right time.

In VR, we have that same ambition. We think if we do something there, it shouldn’t be just for the novelty of it. It should be something that defines the platform, that defines the experience. Certainly we’re looking to build when Spider-man comes out, it’ll be one of the best games on the platform, and when Avengers comes out, it’ll be one of the best games on those platforms. We think our efforts in VR will be the same thing.

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/articles/making-games-at-marvel-an-interview-about-spoilers/1100-6449845/

GAMES 0

Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review

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Super Rude Bear Resurrection is one of the hardest games I’ve ever played–but only at times. Certain games, Resident Evil 4 being a famous example, use a dynamic difficulty system, invisibly adjusting to keep the action challenging but not frustrating. Super Rude Bear Resurrection does something similar, only in a much more obvious, tangible way.

It’s a hardcore platformer in the mold of Super Meat Boy, but with a novel twist that gives meaning to the countless deaths you’ll suffer throughout. Corpses persist after death and can be used to create a safer path through levels (where one false step will send you back to the last checkpoint). In essence, almost every death serves to make the game slightly easier–though you can also clear levels without ever dying. It’s a delightful concept that further enhances a game that’s already strong thanks to its wealth of ideas and fantastic soundtrack.

At its most basic, Super Rude Bear Resurrection is a fairly straightforward platformer, tasking you with navigating stages filled with all manner of deadly spikes, arrows, swinging axes, more spikes, and creatures that toss snowballs at you harmlessly–until those snowballs just nudge you to your doom. You’ll maneuver through levels using simple jumps and wall jumps. You have no offensive capabilities, and the game doesn’t offer any special abilities to unlock or power-ups to find. You could, in theory, complete any level right from the get-go, although it’ll likely take dozens–or, more likely, hundreds–of deaths before you’re able to consistently overcome the trickiest obstacles.

The level design shows a tremendous amount of care on the part of developer Alex Rose Games. Stages are meticulously crafted to maximize difficulty without feeling unfair, but they’re also created in a way that allows for corpses to ease your path. A carcass might block incoming arrows or give you a safe spot in a row of spikes to jump on, and it can destroy certain traps when it comes into contact with them.

It’s easy for the corpses to pile up, particularly due to the way Super Rude Bear Resurrection’s levels toy with you. The game plays with your expectations and sets up hazards to punish you for relying on anticipation, rather than your reactions. Many deaths stem from hazards located immediately after checkpoints–these are seemingly placed for the explicit purpose of punishing your eagerness to immediately get back into the action after respawning. You can practically hear Alex Rose chuckling to himself every time you rush into an easily avoidable death. That might explain the mocking remarks of your floating companion, who also delivers the story (and jokes), allows you to destroy corpses in your path, and lets you scout out the areas ahead.

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Super Rude Bear Resurrection isn’t an especially long game, although seeking out no-death runs, better leaderboard rankings, secret worlds, and dialogue (easy to miss the first time around) provides ample incentive for multiple playthroughs. The primary upside to not being long is also what’s most impressive about Super Rude Bear: it never runs out of steam. It feels fresh from beginning to end thanks to the way it consistently sprinkles in new types of challenges over the course of the entire game. Falling spikes, NPCs with hammers, arrow launchers, homing missiles, spinning lasers–you won’t play for long without encountering a new idea.

Some of these new ideas introduce interesting ways of interacting with corpses. Deaths caused by missiles and lasers freeze your body into an ice block. In the case of the missiles, ice blocks can provide stepping stones over a gap or block further missiles from being fired, while lasers pull the ice in, thereby preventing the lasers from reaching you on your next life.

“On the strength of its pacing and basic mechanics alone, Super Rude Bear Resurrection would make for an extremely engaging platformer. The addition of its corpse mechanic elevates it to something greater.”

Further adding to the variety are the boss fights littered throughout, each with its own unique gimmick that doesn’t feel at odds with the platforming framework of the game. One tasks you with avoiding spikes and the attacks of a breakdancing robot while standing on a rising platform. Another requires you to ride a moving platform through an otherwise standard level while avoiding a flying enemy that attempts to knock you off or crush you. The latter was particularly memorable, as being knocked down doesn’t guarantee death; provided you’re skilled enough, you can jump off of the boss itself and potentially recover. Whereas the bosses in Super Meat Boy have always felt to me more like obstacles that stand in the way of returning to the regular action, Super Rude Bear’s boss stages were among my favorites in the game.

Later levels ask a lot, requiring an almost-superhuman level of precision to complete without a death–an accomplishment I couldn’t even begin to sniff over the last quarter of the game. Yet, because of instant respawns and an excuse to continue listening to the stellar soundtrack, I never found myself frustrated, even when a particular section would cause me to die dozens of times. In fact, it was often hard not to laugh as I amassed an abundance of corpses (every one of which is dumped into a pile from the top of the screen at the conclusion of a level, just as a reminder). These attempts where I clearly wasn’t going to set a new time on the leaderboards often became fun experiments to see just how much I could screw with the design of the level.

In certain cases, the game actually becomes far too easy with even just a few deaths. Thankfully, if you find that to be the case, higher difficulty settings restrict the ability to destroy traps, leave behind corpses, and even use checkpoints. These options give you the flexibility to make the game as difficult as you want, which is great, since it’s most satisfying when played at the highest difficulty you can tolerate. The thrill of making it through a tough level with little help is matched by few other platformers I’ve ever played.

Not everything is quite so well executed, however. Visually, the game isn’t always clear about where you can safely stand or whether a corpse will protect you–spikes or blades sometimes extend beyond a body but won’t hurt you. The lack of an overworld is disappointing, if inessential, but the inability to access leaderboards anytime other than at the end of a level feels like an unfortunate oversight. A glitch when changing difficulties would cause the sound to drop out until I paused and unpaused the action. And certain level elements, such as falling icicles, are occasionally triggered before they should be after a respawn, which requires a quick death to reset. Because this only happened after a death, it never cost me a flawless run, but it was nonetheless a small source of frustration.

For all of these minor gripes, none of them stand in the way of enjoying nearly every second of playtime. On the strength of its pacing and basic mechanics alone, Super Rude Bear Resurrection would make for an extremely engaging platformer. The addition of its corpse mechanic elevates it to something greater, allowing it to simultaneously serve as an extreme challenge for the most diehard platforming fans as well as a game that can be enjoyed by the novice crowd. Super Rude Bear Resurrection demands a lot from you, but the satisfaction of success is immense in the end.

Vía https://www.gamespot.com/reviews/super-rude-bear-resurrection-review/1900-6416675/