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Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

  • Try meditation for the first time with this guided lesson or, if you already practice, enjoy being guided by a world-renowned meditation expert.
  • Sharon Salzberg teaches mindfulness meditation for Big Think Edge.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.

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This mindfulness lesson dispels common myths about meditation and offers a simple guided meditation that you can do anywhere. With repeated practice, this meditation will help you manage your emotions and gain access to your creative intelligence.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge and you’ll learn first-hand from Sharon Salzberg, a New York Times bestselling author and co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society, one of the most prominent meditation centers in the Western world. Under her guidance, you’ll learn what to expect from meditation and the best ways to challenge yourself and observe your thoughts.

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Meditation in the palm of your hand

In moments when you need to find focus or clear your mind for a creative task ahead, Sharon Salzberg’s “Develop mindfulness” lesson for Big Think Edge is an invaluable respite and training ground for your mind – one that you can return to over and over again as your life’s and career’s challenges evolve.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge to boost your mental focus and gain a competitive advantage in your field.

Do it before we launch on March 30, and you’ll get 20% off monthly and annual subscriptions.

None


Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Learn

Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

  • Try meditation for the first time with this guided lesson or, if you already practice, enjoy being guided by a world-renowned meditation expert.
  • Sharon Salzberg teaches mindfulness meditation for Big Think Edge.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.

None

This mindfulness lesson dispels common myths about meditation and offers a simple guided meditation that you can do anywhere. With repeated practice, this meditation will help you manage your emotions and gain access to your creative intelligence.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge and you’ll learn first-hand from Sharon Salzberg, a New York Times bestselling author and co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society, one of the most prominent meditation centers in the Western world. Under her guidance, you’ll learn what to expect from meditation and the best ways to challenge yourself and observe your thoughts.

None

Meditation in the palm of your hand

In moments when you need to find focus or clear your mind for a creative task ahead, Sharon Salzberg’s “Develop mindfulness” lesson for Big Think Edge is an invaluable respite and training ground for your mind – one that you can return to over and over again as your life’s and career’s challenges evolve.

Subscribe to Big Think Edge to boost your mental focus and gain a competitive advantage in your field.

Do it before we launch on March 30, and you’ll get 20% off monthly and annual subscriptions.

None


Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Learn

Behind-the-scenes at Chicago’s Dearborn Denim & Apparel

How are denim jeans made? Go behind-the-scenes at Dearborn Denim & Apparel in this promotional video by ‘Chicago Aussie’ Jack Brandtman. From cutting the fabric, to stitching, to adding finishing touches like buttons and labels, the video summarizes the team’s handiwork, and is one in a series of videos that…

The post Behind-the-scenes at Chicago’s Dearborn Denim & Apparel appeared first on The Kid Should See This.

from The Kid Should See This

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Climate change melts Mount Everest’s ice, exposing dead bodies of past climbers

Climate change melts Mount Everest’s ice, exposing dead bodies of past climbers

  • Mt. Everest is the final resting place of about 200 climbers who never made it down.
  • Recent glacial melting, caused by climate change, has made many of the bodies previously hidden by ice and snow visible again.
  • While many bodies are quite visible and well known, others are renowned for being lost for decades.

People die trying to reach the top of Mt. Everest. While about 5,000 people have gotten to the top and came back down to tell the tale, 300 have not and 200 bodies remain on the mountain. Many of these bodies have been covered by snow and ice over the years, but now with glaciers melting due to climate change some of the long-hidden bodies are becoming visible again.

Ang Tshering Sherpa, former president of Nepal Mountaineering Association, told the BBC: “Because of global warming, the ice sheet and glaciers are fast melting and the dead bodies that remained buried all these years are now becoming exposed. We have brought down dead bodies of some mountaineers who died in recent years, but the old ones that remained buried are now coming out.”

The ice on Everest is melting fast, in 2016 the Nepalese Army had to be called in to drain lakes swollen with glacial-melt that threatened to flood. The Khumbu Glacier is melting so fast that ponds are forming and linking up to create small lakes. Not all the bodies that turn up are made visible by global warming though, glaciers move and snow drifts shift over time so previously hidden bodies are always at risk of coming back into view.

Why leave the bodies there at all?
Why not bring people down as soon as they die?

It costs a lot of money to go get a body on the highest mountain in the world, up to $80,000 to be precise. Then there is the problem of actually doing it, since some attempts to retrieve bodies are forced by difficult conditions to abandon their efforts.

Some people, such as mountaineer Alan Arnette, argue that the bodies should be left there. He told the BBC, “Most climbers like to be left on the mountains if they died. So it would be deemed disrespectful to just remove them unless they need to be moved from the climbing route or their families want them.”

This doesn’t stop people from wanting the bodies taken down or dealt with in other ways. David Sharp‘s body was moved out of sight in 2007. George Mallory’s body took 75 years to find and was given an Anglican burial in 1999. Over time, the elements often move bodies away from the main routes up the mountain to more isolated areas where they remain undisturbed.

Everest’s
chilling landmarks

The bodies that remain in view are often used as waypoints for the living. Some of them are well-known markers that have earned nicknames.

For instance, the image above is of “Green Boots,” the unidentified corpse named for its neon footwear. Widely believed to be the body of Tsewang Paljor, the remains are well known as a guide point for passing mountaineers. Perhaps it is too well known, as the climber David Sharp died next to Green Boots while dozens of people walked past him — many presuming he was the famous corpse.

A large area below the summit has earned the discordant nickname “Rainbow Valley” for being filled with the bright and colorfully dressed corpses of maintainers who never made it back down. The sight of a frozen hand or foot sticking out of the snow is so common that Tshering Pandey Bhote, vice president of Nepal National Mountain Guides Association claimed: “Most climbers are mentally prepared to come across such a sight.”

Other bodies are famous for not having been found yet. Andrew “Sandy” Irvine, the climbing partner of George Mallory, may have been one of the first two people to reach the summit of Everest a full 30 years before Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay did it. Since they never made it back down, nobody knows just how close to the top they made it.

Mallory’s frozen body was found by chance in the ’90s without the Kodak cameras he brought up to record the climb with. It has been speculated that Irvine might have them and Kodak says they could still develop the film if the cameras turn up. Circumstantial evidence suggests that they died on the way back down from the summit, Mallory had his goggles off and a photo of his wife he said he’d put at the peak wasn’t in his coat. If Irvine is found with that camera, history books might need rewriting.

As Everest’s glaciers melt its morbid history comes into clearer view. Will the melting cause old bodies to become new landmarks? Will Sandy Irvine be found? Only time will tell.

Climate change melts Mount Everest’s ice, exposing dead bodies of past climbers

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For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over.

For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over.

  • Our theories about the world, even about history or the geopolitics of the present, tend to be shaped by Anglo perspectives of the Western industrial democracies, particularly those in the United States and the United Kingdom.
  • The West, however, is not united. Canada, for instance, acts in many ways that are not in line with American or British policies, especially in regard to populism. Even if it were united, though, it would not represent most of the world’s population.
  • European ideas, such as parliamentary democracy and civil service, spread across the world in the 19th century. In the 20th century, American values such as entrepreneurialism went global. In the 21st century, however, what we’re seeing now is an Asianization — an Asian confidence that they can determine their own political systems, their own models, and adapt to their own circumstances.


The Future Is Asian
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For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over.