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‘Sicario: Day of The Soldado’ Director Stefano Sollima on the Importance of Authenticity and Real Locations [Interview]

With Sicario: Day of The Soldado, director Stefano Sollima roughened the edges of screenwriter Taylor Sheridan‘s potential trilogy. With Kate Macy (Emily Blunt) no longer around, Sollima felt Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro) and Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) unleashed naturally meant things would turn bleaker. A crowd-pleasing thriller Sollima’s sequel is not, and nor should it be.

It’s a suitably bleak and often unpleasant experience that reveals more about Alejandro and Graver without completely stripping them of mystery. The main thrill is watching one of the best actors around, Benicio Del Toro, continue to make you both fearful and empathetic of Alejandro.

With the sequel now available on Blu-ray, we had the chance to ask Sollima about Del Toro’s performance, his time in El Paso and Juarez, long tracking shots, and more.

When you first got involved, where did your research start? How did you immerse yourself in this world?

I always do in each project that I am involved in. It’s really important to make the movie real, and also it’s really important to get some ideas that are a little bit more original than your own imagination. I think it’s really important opportunity telling the truth and to be realistic, so you as the audience member, what we’re portraying is absolutely the truth.

On Soldado, it was to study how it works, the illegal immigration, by the point-of-view of the Coyotes. So the people who are actually doing it for real, and then what you learn is that they’re a different kind of gangster. Sometimes it’s just logistics, or they just drive people from point A to point B. This is what I studied. Now really, by going to the border by doing interviews, almost everybody could be potentially involved in the product.

What else did you learn from your time in Mexico and El Paso? 

I’ve been between the border of El Paso and Juarez, so I’ve been through Juarez. I’ve been back and forth many times to interview people and to understand how they work for real. What’s the process for the Coyote? And on the other side, what we try to learn about a character like Elijah, the kid. His house is the last one before the fence and the border. And so the idea was to, for example, to give them a passport, because with a U.S. passport you can move the border back and forth super quickly. For the cartel, people need to be residents, born and raised in Juarez are more entrusted, and they have more value, because it is easier for them to move back and forth, and to move through the border without being captured or arrested. This is for example an element that we add after the research.

I read you and cinematographer Dariusz [Wolski] watched quite a few documentaries and did a lot of research together. How did that research maybe influence the style and atmosphere you wanted for the film?

I think the visual style, I don’t think it’s something abstract that you decide way before you start prepping the movie. I offer that especially when you shoot a movie like Soldado, that it’s based on quality and shooting almost 95% in real location. It’s like the process is to know what “je ne sais quo” about the movie, and in this case it was to grip you, what’s really important to see and to read, the desert. So for example I decided to go more for long track shots than for multiple cameras set up and that impacts everything. So we went for something that was a little bit more impactful of the mood because it was a little lower, a little bit steadier, and it was more wide. I think that for the night scenes we decided to go for a gritty black mood.

sicario day of the soldado early buzz

Speaking of those long tracking shots, the caravan sequence is fantastic, just that unnerving music and Benicio Del Toro’s sinister smile. What can you tell me about timing that sequel?

Of course when you work on long track shot, especially if it involves special effects and timing, it’s really important. So, an incredible amount of work, but not in design. Even in a complicated action piece, I want to see the action from the eyes of a character. I did that on the convoy sequence. I decided to go and adopt a specific point-of-view from the little girl, who’s completely freaked out, and scared to death from what she’s experiencing.

Of course you were on location and using practical effects more often than not, but are there any subtle CG effects maybe the eye wouldn’t notice right away?

Yes, of course. It’s happening in the car, you know Benicio Del Toro and the grenade, and in the car we completely added the passenger, Bobby, who is trying to find the bomb right before it explodes. Which wasn’t practical, of course. It was too dangerous, and after everything else is practical.

I find Matt and Alejandro’s relationship fascinating. It was all about the work in the first movie, but I wondered this time how much does Matt actually care for Alejandro, if it all. Does he? 

I think that this was something really along with Taylor we worked on a lot, because I think there is a moment that’s real interesting. Because in the beginning, it’s like you portray them as two buddies. They explain to you that they are sort of confidants. They know each other. They worked together a lot, but later on Brian and Matt receive a direct order to kill him. He doesn’t make any objection like, “Oh no. I cannot. He’s my friend.” The only question he asks is, “Do you know how long it takes to make someone like Alejandro?” So, I love this moment because for Matt it’s like comedy in this moment. He’s complaining the time he needed to create this perfect weapon, more than killing the friend. I think it is really interesting the call, when they speak together. I mean, Alejandro probably expected this, but not Matt ordering to kill the girl. So he says get rid of the girl, otherwise I have to come and see you, and the girl. I think it’s an interesting layer in their relationship.

Having played the characters before, I imagine Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro had ideas for them for the sequel. What was important to them to communicate in Day of Soldado?

It was an interesting experience because they already knew the character. But the point was that this screenplay that Taylor said it on script was so complex. It was for them, in a way, it was to work by knowing in advance, that is what you learn from the first chapter, but by going really much more deep in the exploration of their character. Because in a way in the first one, the story and Matt and Alejandro are basically seen from Emily Blunt’s character, from her point-of-view. So you know what she sees, and in Soldado you literally experience who they are.

So it’s a much more complex the job. In a way, they know the character. Let’s say you had a sort of grip over what you character could or could not do, but like I said, the job was really complex, so it was a sort of exploration in the deepness of both characters.

My last question for you, I’m curious to see what you’ll bring to the action in the Call of Duty movie after seeing Day of Soldado. What do you have in mind for those set pieces? 

It’s a super secret. I cannot say anything about Call of Duty. If so I’d have to kill you [Laughs].

***

Sicario: Day of Soldado is now available on Blu-ray and DVD.

The post ‘Sicario: Day of The Soldado’ Director Stefano Sollima on the Importance of Authenticity and Real Locations [Interview] appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/sicario-day-of-the-soldado-director-stefano-sollima-on-the-importance-of-authenticity-and-real-locations-interview/

‘The Little Drummer Girl’ Trailer: A New British Spy Series to Obsess Over

The Little Drummer Girl trailer

A couple of years ago, BBC One and AMC made waves with The Night Manager, an adaptation of author John le Carré‘s spy novel. Those networks saw the success of that show and jumped in on another le Carré adaptation, a 1970s-set thriller called The Little Drummer Girl. Oldboy director Chan-Wook Park marks his first entry into directing television with this limited series, and he’s gathered a great cast that includes Michael Shannon, Alexander Skarsgard, and Florence Pugh.

Take a look at the newest The Little Drummer Girl trailer below.

The Little Drummer Girl Trailer

Florence Pugh has appeared in The Commuter, Lady Macbeth, Outlaw King, and more, but The Little Drummer Girl looks to give her one of her juiciest parts yet. In this riff on le Carré’s 1983 novel, Pugh plays Charlie, “a fiery actress and idealist whose resolve is tested after she meets the mysterious Becker (Alexander Skarsgård) while on holiday in Greece. It quickly becomes apparent that his intentions are not what they seem, and her encounter with him entangles her in a complex plot devised by the spy mastermind Kurtz (Michael Shannon). Charlie takes on the role of a lifetime as a double agent while remaining uncertain of her own loyalties.”

I’m a sucker for layered stories that feature actors playing characters who are themselves playing characters, and with this cast and a visual master like Chan-Wook Park (Stoker, Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, The Handmaiden) behind the camera, this seems like a must-watch. Then again, I was also interested in The Night Manager, and I gave up on that one about halfway through because of the glacial pacing. I know le Carré’s stories aren’t always breathlessly told – remember, this is the same author who wrote Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy – but despite that, I hope this limited series picks up the pace a little.

Unfortunately, early reviews sound like this show gets off to a slow start. Here’s an excerpt from THR’s review:

For its opening two hours at least, Little Drummer Girl delivers surprisingly few thrills and hooks. Though it is more faithful to its source novel than Night Manager, the screenplay by Michael Lesslie and Claire Wilson strips out much of le Carre’s moral and political anguish without adding enough of the sexy thriller elements that made Tom Hiddleston’s buttock-baring spy romp into deluxe pulp television.

Still, I’ll definitely be giving this a shot because they had me at “Michael Shannon plays an Israeli spy master.”

The six-part series airs on BBC One starting on October 28. In the United States, it will air on AMC, where it will be presented in two-hour blocks for three nights in a row beginning on November 19, 2018.

Little Drummer Girl poster

The post ‘The Little Drummer Girl’ Trailer: A New British Spy Series to Obsess Over appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/little-drummer-girl-trailer-new/

Now ‘Luke Cage’ is Canceled at Netflix, Apparently No Longer Bulletproof

Luke Cage Canceled

What’s the opposite of Sweet Christmas?

Exactly one week after Iron Fist was canceled at Netflix, the streaming service has just axed another member of The Defenders from getting another season. Luke Cage has been canceled and will no longer be getting a third season order, which came as a surprise to showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker and his writers room. Get the details below.

Deadline has word on Luke Cage canceled with a statement from Marvel and Netflix:

“Unfortunately, Marvel’s Luke Cage will not return for a third season. Everyone at Marvel Television and Netflix is grateful to the dedicated showrunner, writers, cast and crew who brought Harlem’s Hero to life for the past two seasons, and to all the fans who have supported the series.”

When Iron First was canceled, everyone working on Luke Cage was still expecting a third season renewal. In fact, when Iron Fist was canceled, it was hinted that the character would still return, leading many to believe the a team-up of the two characters in a Heroes for Hire story arc would finally play out. But now both of the heroes are out of a job. So what happened with Luke Cage?

Some of the scripts for the next season of Luke Cage had already been turned in to Netflix, and apparently the streaming service wasn’t impressed with what they had been given so far. The result was the old standby of creative differences and neither Netflix nor the Luke Cage crew could come to a compromise to strikes a deal that would have locked down a third season.

In the wake of the disagreement behind the scenes, the writers room was put on hold and some “turmoil ensued this week.” That’s where the creative differences came into play with regards to where the show was heading, and there was even talk of some personnel changes. All those difficulties led to Netflix deciding just to cancel the series altogether.

So what does this mean for the future of Iron Fist and Luke Cage? They may not have a home at Netflix anymore, but let’s not forget that Disney has their own streaming service coming in 2019, and both shows could easily end up continuing over there. If they don’t both return with their own shows, they could easily come back in a Heroes for Hire series, or one could come back in the other’s series (likely Iron Fist popping up in Luke Cage).

As for Jessica Jones, Daredevil and The Punisher, it doesn’t sound like those shows are on the verge of cancellation. But we thought the same thing about Luke Cage, so who knows what Netflix is thinking at this point. Stay tuned.

The post Now ‘Luke Cage’ is Canceled at Netflix, Apparently No Longer Bulletproof appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/luke-cage-canceled/

Now ‘Luke Cage’ is Canceled at Netflix, Apparently No Longer Bulletproof

Luke Cage Canceled

What’s the opposite of Sweet Christmas?

Exactly one week after Iron Fist was canceled at Netflix, the streaming service has just axed another member of The Defenders from getting another season. Luke Cage has been canceled and will no longer be getting a third season order, which came as a surprise to showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker and his writers room. Get the details below.

Deadline has word on Luke Cage canceled with a statement from Marvel and Netflix:

“Unfortunately, Marvel’s Luke Cage will not return for a third season. Everyone at Marvel Television and Netflix is grateful to the dedicated showrunner, writers, cast and crew who brought Harlem’s Hero to life for the past two seasons, and to all the fans who have supported the series.”

When Iron First was canceled, everyone working on Luke Cage was still expecting a third season renewal. In fact, when Iron Fist was canceled, it was hinted that the character would still return, leading many to believe the a team-up of the two characters in a Heroes for Hire story arc would finally play out. But now both of the heroes are out of a job. So what happened with Luke Cage?

Some of the scripts for the next season of Luke Cage had already been turned in to Netflix, and apparently the streaming service wasn’t impressed with what they had been given so far. The result was the old standby of creative differences and neither Netflix nor the Luke Cage crew could come to a compromise to strikes a deal that would have locked down a third season.

In the wake of the disagreement behind the scenes, the writers room was put on hold and some “turmoil ensued this week.” That’s where the creative differences came into play with regards to where the show was heading, and there was even talk of some personnel changes. All those difficulties led to Netflix deciding just to cancel the series altogether.

So what does this mean for the future of Iron Fist and Luke Cage? They may not have a home at Netflix anymore, but let’s not forget that Disney has their own streaming service coming in 2019, and both shows could easily end up continuing over there. If they don’t both return with their own shows, they could easily come back in a Heroes for Hire series, or one could come back in the other’s series (likely Iron Fist popping up in Luke Cage).

As for Jessica Jones, Daredevil and The Punisher, it doesn’t sound like those shows are on the verge of cancellation. But we thought the same thing about Luke Cage, so who knows what Netflix is thinking at this point. Stay tuned.

The post Now ‘Luke Cage’ is Canceled at Netflix, Apparently No Longer Bulletproof appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/luke-cage-canceled/

This Week In Trailers: Tito and the Birds, All Creatures Here Below, Unlovable, Weightless, Don’t Be a Dick About It

Green Band Trailer

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising?

This week we meet some brothers who share a special bond, see how emotions can become weapons, steal a kid for fun, break the cycle of sex addiction, and meet an offspring we didn’t know we had.

Tito and the Birds

Brazilians Gustavo Steinberg, Gabriel Bitar, and André Catoto tell an animated tale that seems reminiscent of Monsters, Inc. in how it weaponizes emotions.

Tito is a shy 10-year-old boy who lives with his mother. Suddenly, an unusual epidemic starts to spread, making people sick whenever they get scared. Tito quickly discovers that the cure is somehow related to his missing father’s research on bird song. He embarks on a journey to save the world from the epidemic with his friends. Tito’s search for the antidote becomes a quest for his missing father and for his own identity.

The trailer promises an adventure that departs from the usual animated fare audience have been getting in the past couple of decades. The style seems more artistic, rough around the edges (literally), but infused with the kind of originality that kids ought to devour feverishly.

All Creatures Here Below

Directed by Collin Schiffli, and starring David Dastmalchian and Karen Gillan, the trailer is one of the best I’ve seen all month. Written by Dastmalchian himself, a heartbreaking premise manages to keep you moving along effortlessly:

Gensan (David Dastmalchian) and Ruby (Karen Gillan) struggle to thrive in the face of abject poverty. When Gensan loses his job and is forced to break the law they escape and seek refuge in Kansas City, a place Ruby’s deeply afraid of. Ruby’s indelible choices, and desire to make a family, complicate their journey to freedom.

The story beats are telegraphed nicely without giving a hint where we’re going to end. If Dastmalchian’s written work for the incredibly powerful Animals that came out a few years ago is any indication of this film’s quality, I am prepared and expecting something great.

Unlovable

A drama? A musical? John Hawkes playing the gee-tar? Give it to me. Coming from executive producers Jay & Mark Duplass, this movie seems to fit perfectly within Duplass universe. It’s a small story, with low stakes, but it leans heavily into the actors bringing something incredible to their roles. Director Suzi Yoonessi isn’t doing anything extraordinary here with how she’s capturing what’s happening before us, but the trailer shows us how we’re going to be more focused on the characters themselves.

Weightless

This trailer dramatically crushes it while being narratively devastating, all in just a minute and a half. Director Jaron Albertin masterfully mixes a vérité style in a way that feels like you’re watching both something fictional and very much real. The mix works exceptionally well as the trailer blends these two styles effortlessly. We get just enough narrative to set the table, and everything that comes after that only helps to bolster the case why this is a little film that could use some attention. The music is lovely, and the shot of the father/son in the car as they tear down a dragstrip together looks like it’s worth the price of admission alone.

Don’t Be a Dick About It

Yes, the title catches your eye, but director Ben Mullinkosson’s documentary about two brothers actually looks fascinating. What we’re exploring here is the bond that two brothers share, a topic that may seem facile at first, but that misses the point. The trailer subtly captures that unique relationship that exists between siblings. It’s sweet, tender, funny, and looks like an excellent slice-of-life portrait of brothers in arms.

Nota bene: If you have any suggestions of trailers for possible inclusion in this column, even have a trailer of your own to pitch, please let me know by sending me a note at Christopher_Stipp@yahoo.com or look me up via Twitter at @Stipp

In case you missed them, here are the other trailers we covered at /Film this week:

The post This Week In Trailers: Tito and the Birds, All Creatures Here Below, Unlovable, Weightless, Don’t Be a Dick About It appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/this-week-in-trailers-tito-and-the-birds-all-creatures-here-below-unlovable-weightless-dont-be-a-dick-about-it/

This Week In Trailers: Tito and the Birds, All Creatures Here Below, Unlovable, Weightless, Don’t Be a Dick About It

Green Band Trailer

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising?

This week we meet some brothers who share a special bond, see how emotions can become weapons, steal a kid for fun, break the cycle of sex addiction, and meet an offspring we didn’t know we had.

Tito and the Birds

Brazilians Gustavo Steinberg, Gabriel Bitar, and André Catoto tell an animated tale that seems reminiscent of Monsters, Inc. in how it weaponizes emotions.

Tito is a shy 10-year-old boy who lives with his mother. Suddenly, an unusual epidemic starts to spread, making people sick whenever they get scared. Tito quickly discovers that the cure is somehow related to his missing father’s research on bird song. He embarks on a journey to save the world from the epidemic with his friends. Tito’s search for the antidote becomes a quest for his missing father and for his own identity.

The trailer promises an adventure that departs from the usual animated fare audience have been getting in the past couple of decades. The style seems more artistic, rough around the edges (literally), but infused with the kind of originality that kids ought to devour feverishly.

All Creatures Here Below

Directed by Collin Schiffli, and starring David Dastmalchian and Karen Gillan, the trailer is one of the best I’ve seen all month. Written by Dastmalchian himself, a heartbreaking premise manages to keep you moving along effortlessly:

Gensan (David Dastmalchian) and Ruby (Karen Gillan) struggle to thrive in the face of abject poverty. When Gensan loses his job and is forced to break the law they escape and seek refuge in Kansas City, a place Ruby’s deeply afraid of. Ruby’s indelible choices, and desire to make a family, complicate their journey to freedom.

The story beats are telegraphed nicely without giving a hint where we’re going to end. If Dastmalchian’s written work for the incredibly powerful Animals that came out a few years ago is any indication of this film’s quality, I am prepared and expecting something great.

Unlovable

A drama? A musical? John Hawkes playing the gee-tar? Give it to me. Coming from executive producers Jay & Mark Duplass, this movie seems to fit perfectly within Duplass universe. It’s a small story, with low stakes, but it leans heavily into the actors bringing something incredible to their roles. Director Suzi Yoonessi isn’t doing anything extraordinary here with how she’s capturing what’s happening before us, but the trailer shows us how we’re going to be more focused on the characters themselves.

Weightless

This trailer dramatically crushes it while being narratively devastating, all in just a minute and a half. Director Jaron Albertin masterfully mixes a vérité style in a way that feels like you’re watching both something fictional and very much real. The mix works exceptionally well as the trailer blends these two styles effortlessly. We get just enough narrative to set the table, and everything that comes after that only helps to bolster the case why this is a little film that could use some attention. The music is lovely, and the shot of the father/son in the car as they tear down a dragstrip together looks like it’s worth the price of admission alone.

Don’t Be a Dick About It

Yes, the title catches your eye, but director Ben Mullinkosson’s documentary about two brothers actually looks fascinating. What we’re exploring here is the bond that two brothers share, a topic that may seem facile at first, but that misses the point. The trailer subtly captures that unique relationship that exists between siblings. It’s sweet, tender, funny, and looks like an excellent slice-of-life portrait of brothers in arms.

Nota bene: If you have any suggestions of trailers for possible inclusion in this column, even have a trailer of your own to pitch, please let me know by sending me a note at Christopher_Stipp@yahoo.com or look me up via Twitter at @Stipp

In case you missed them, here are the other trailers we covered at /Film this week:

The post This Week In Trailers: Tito and the Birds, All Creatures Here Below, Unlovable, Weightless, Don’t Be a Dick About It appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/this-week-in-trailers-tito-and-the-birds-all-creatures-here-below-unlovable-weightless-dont-be-a-dick-about-it/

This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

This week on NFB.ca we looked back at the 1970s, a decade famous for bell-bottom jeans, the Watergate scandal, and women’s rights. Not to mention some kick-ass music.

The 1970s were also a pivotal decade in Canada, as it saw the culmination of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, while Trudeau spent the entire decade as Prime Minister of the country. Here are 6 films that give us a particularly Canadian perspective on the decade. Enjoy!

The Devil’s Share

Filmmaker Luc Bourdon is at it again with his latest film, a collection of archival footage masterfully woven together to tell the story of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. Using clips from almost 200 NFB films, he creates something entirely new that offers fresh insight on a decades-old historical event. The film is a brand-new online release, and a visual treat. Enjoy!

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/devils_share/

High Grass Circus

This feature-length doc will take you back to the 1970s for a trippy look at the inner workings of a traveling circus. With what we know today, circuses are falling out of fashion. Probably rightfully so. With the big animals gone, and the three rings reduced to one, it’s just not the same experience anymore. This film will take you back to the heyday of the circus and remind you of the magic it once invoked.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/high_grass_circus/

A Pinto for the Prince

Once you get past the whole question of why the Blood tribe of Alberta would make Prince Charles an honorary chief, it’s very easy to get lost in this 1970’s short from Colin Low and John Spotton. Prince Charles is looking very young, and painfully awkward, as he is led through the ceremony, complete with face paint and a lesson in tribal dancing.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pinto_for_the_prince/

The Mad Canadian

This 10-minute short is like a teaser for Robert Fortier’s feature-length doc, The Devil at your Heels. It introduces you to stuntman Ken Carter, our very own Evel Knieval. You’ll get to watch as he goes about his crazy antics, like driving his car over a line of parked cars. Oh, the 1970s. Interestingly enough, this film was shot the same year seatbelt laws were introduced in Canada. Coincidence?

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mad_canadian/

 Mudflats Living

Release your inner hippie with this 1970s gem about life inside an artists’ community in North Vancouver. This drug-free, anti-establishment group rejects mainstreams society in favour of their little paradise in the mudflats. But while they’re embracing a philosophy of love, the mayor of North Van is embracing the idea of a shopping mall on their land.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mudflats_living/

Hard Rider

A few weeks ago, we featured Ride, a film about modern day rodeo riders. This film takes us back to the sport during the 1970s, specifically the stampede trail from Texas to Alberta. We see the same sport, the roping and bronco busting, but through the lens of world-champion cowboy, Kenny McLean.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hard_rider/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/10/20/1970s-films/

This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films

This week on NFB.ca we looked back at the 1970s, a decade famous for bell-bottom jeans, the Watergate scandal, and women’s rights. Not to mention some kick-ass music.

The 1970s were also a pivotal decade in Canada, as it saw the culmination of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, while Trudeau spent the entire decade as Prime Minister of the country. Here are 6 films that give us a particularly Canadian perspective on the decade. Enjoy!

The Devil’s Share

Filmmaker Luc Bourdon is at it again with his latest film, a collection of archival footage masterfully woven together to tell the story of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. Using clips from almost 200 NFB films, he creates something entirely new that offers fresh insight on a decades-old historical event. The film is a brand-new online release, and a visual treat. Enjoy!

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/devils_share/

High Grass Circus

This feature-length doc will take you back to the 1970s for a trippy look at the inner workings of a traveling circus. With what we know today, circuses are falling out of fashion. Probably rightfully so. With the big animals gone, and the three rings reduced to one, it’s just not the same experience anymore. This film will take you back to the heyday of the circus and remind you of the magic it once invoked.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/high_grass_circus/

A Pinto for the Prince

Once you get past the whole question of why the Blood tribe of Alberta would make Prince Charles an honorary chief, it’s very easy to get lost in this 1970’s short from Colin Low and John Spotton. Prince Charles is looking very young, and painfully awkward, as he is led through the ceremony, complete with face paint and a lesson in tribal dancing.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pinto_for_the_prince/

The Mad Canadian

This 10-minute short is like a teaser for Robert Fortier’s feature-length doc, The Devil at your Heels. It introduces you to stuntman Ken Carter, our very own Evel Knieval. You’ll get to watch as he goes about his crazy antics, like driving his car over a line of parked cars. Oh, the 1970s. Interestingly enough, this film was shot the same year seatbelt laws were introduced in Canada. Coincidence?

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mad_canadian/

 Mudflats Living

Release your inner hippie with this 1970s gem about life inside an artists’ community in North Vancouver. This drug-free, anti-establishment group rejects mainstreams society in favour of their little paradise in the mudflats. But while they’re embracing a philosophy of love, the mayor of North Van is embracing the idea of a shopping mall on their land.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mudflats_living/

Hard Rider

A few weeks ago, we featured Ride, a film about modern day rodeo riders. This film takes us back to the sport during the 1970s, specifically the stampede trail from Texas to Alberta. We see the same sport, the roping and bronco busting, but through the lens of world-champion cowboy, Kenny McLean.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hard_rider/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/10/20/1970s-films/
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This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

This week on NFB.ca we looked back at the 1970s, a decade famous for bell-bottom jeans, the Watergate scandal, and women’s rights. Not to mention some kick-ass music.

The 1970s were also a pivotal decade in Canada, as it saw the culmination of the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, while Trudeau spent the entire decade as Prime Minister of the country. Here are 6 films that give us a particularly Canadian perspective on the decade. Enjoy!

The Devil’s Share

Filmmaker Luc Bourdon is at it again with his latest film, a collection of archival footage masterfully woven together to tell the story of Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. Using clips from almost 200 NFB films, he creates something entirely new that offers fresh insight on a decades-old historical event. The film is a brand-new online release, and a visual treat. Enjoy!

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/devils_share/

High Grass Circus

This feature-length doc will take you back to the 1970s for a trippy look at the inner workings of a traveling circus. With what we know today, circuses are falling out of fashion. Probably rightfully so. With the big animals gone, and the three rings reduced to one, it’s just not the same experience anymore. This film will take you back to the heyday of the circus and remind you of the magic it once invoked.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/high_grass_circus/

A Pinto for the Prince

Once you get past the whole question of why the Blood tribe of Alberta would make Prince Charles an honorary chief, it’s very easy to get lost in this 1970’s short from Colin Low and John Spotton. Prince Charles is looking very young, and painfully awkward, as he is led through the ceremony, complete with face paint and a lesson in tribal dancing.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pinto_for_the_prince/

The Mad Canadian

This 10-minute short is like a teaser for Robert Fortier’s feature-length doc, The Devil at your Heels. It introduces you to stuntman Ken Carter, our very own Evel Knieval. You’ll get to watch as he goes about his crazy antics, like driving his car over a line of parked cars. Oh, the 1970s. Interestingly enough, this film was shot the same year seatbelt laws were introduced in Canada. Coincidence?

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mad_canadian/

 Mudflats Living

Release your inner hippie with this 1970s gem about life inside an artists’ community in North Vancouver. This drug-free, anti-establishment group rejects mainstreams society in favour of their little paradise in the mudflats. But while they’re embracing a philosophy of love, the mayor of North Van is embracing the idea of a shopping mall on their land.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mudflats_living/

Hard Rider

A few weeks ago, we featured Ride, a film about modern day rodeo riders. This film takes us back to the sport during the 1970s, specifically the stampede trail from Texas to Alberta. We see the same sport, the roping and bronco busting, but through the lens of world-champion cowboy, Kenny McLean.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hard_rider/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca: Trip Back to the 1970s with 5 Films appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/10/20/1970s-films/

Mailbag: Producer/Executive Producer Differences, Review Writing Process, Film Adaptations, Halloween Plans, Translated Interviews & More

harry potter

On the October 19 2018 episode of /Film Daily, /Film editor-in-chief Peter Sciretta is joined by /Film managing editor Jacob Hall, senior writer Ben Pearson and writers Hoai-Tran Bui and Chris Evangelista to answer reader e-mail in the Mail Bag.

You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (here is the RSS URL if you need it).

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/uzvkr-9cd628?from=yiiadmin&download=1&version=1&vjs=1&skin=4&auto=0&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&download=1&rtl=0

Opening Banter: HT talks about doing an interview with a translator.

 

In The Mailbag:

  • Chris from Ohio writes in: What are your plans for Halloween?”
  • Britton from Louisville KY writes in: “What is the difference between a producer and an executive producer? Do they both get best picture oscars if their movie wins?”
    • Peter explains:
      • An Executive Producer is the top executive of the operations, whereas the producer is the manager of the operations.
      • The executive producer prepares the budget and acquires the investors, while the producer makes sure how the budget is properly utilized.
      • The producer hires the people with the right talents and skills for the movie where the producer himself is hired by the Executive Producer.  For the most part, the executive producer has very little to do with the hiring process, aside from hiring the producer.
      • The producer is on set for the entire production (although some films have multiple producers, technical producers and a creative producers), the executive producer is not on set all the time but is used in more of an advisory capacity, overseeing the scripts and marketing.
      • A producer is always eligible for awards in the industry, on the other hand, the Executive producer is not eligible for awards.
      • Sometimes an executive producer is more of a credit than a job.
  • Damon P. from St. Louis, MO writes in “I was wondering, since many of the team reads books that are movies or will eventually be movies, if they believe that breaking up a film into two parts (think Deathly Hallows, or Mockingjay) to make a book more complete in film format is a good thing.  So many times we hear “The book is better” why is that? Is that because the movies are limited by time, to incorporate additional plots points or anything like that. Would it be better to break a movie into two (or three) parts in order to give the source material it’s due?”
  • Leanne R. from LA writes in “Here’s a quick mailbag question that occurred to me as I was listening to the 12/21 episode: what are the best films directed by & starring the same person? (or to widen the field, including the director as a minor role? e.g., Tarantino or Mel Gibson films)”
    • Peter: Well first of all I think we should discount cameos (M Night, Tarantino…etc). Ben Affleck (Town, Argo) although I feel when hes not in the movie his films are better (Gone Baby Gone)
    • HT: Citizen Kane, Life is Beautiful
    • Chris: Unforgiven, A Star Is Born, Dick Tracy, Do The Right Thing
    • Jacob: Citizen Kane, Unforgiven, lots of Buster Keaton/Charlie Chaplin movies
    • Ben: The Outlaw Josey Wales, High Plains Drifter, A Quiet Place, Rocky sequels
  • Drew from Houston, TX writes in “Hey /Film Daily team,  I really enjoyed the conversation about becoming a film writer. I had another question taking that one step further for those on the site who write reviews: what is your process? Obviously it’s hard to take notes when watching a film in theaters. Do you create an outline before diving into a review? Does Chris take notes when reviewing tv shows or blu-rays before writing his review? Just curious to hear a little more about the process.  Thanks!”

All the other stuff you need to know:

  • You can find more about all the stories we mentioned on today’s show at slashfilm.com, and linked inside the show notes.
  • /Film Daily is published every weekday, bringing you the most exciting news from the world of movies and television as well as deeper dives into the great features from slashfilm.com.
  • You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (RSS).
  • Send your feedback, questions, comments and concerns to us at peter@slashfilm.com. Please leave your name and general geographic location in case we mention the e-mail on the air.
  • Please rate and review the podcast on iTunes, tell your friends and spread the word!
  • Thanks to Sam Hume for our logo.

The post Mailbag: Producer/Executive Producer Differences, Review Writing Process, Film Adaptations, Halloween Plans, Translated Interviews & More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/mailbag-producer-executive-producer-differences-review-writing-process-film-adaptations-halloween-plans-translated-interviews-more/

Mailbag: Producer/Executive Producer Differences, Review Writing Process, Film Adaptations, Halloween Plans, Translated Interviews & More

harry potter

On the October 19 2018 episode of /Film Daily, /Film editor-in-chief Peter Sciretta is joined by /Film managing editor Jacob Hall, senior writer Ben Pearson and writers Hoai-Tran Bui and Chris Evangelista to answer reader e-mail in the Mail Bag.

You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (here is the RSS URL if you need it).

https://www.podbean.com/media/player/uzvkr-9cd628?from=yiiadmin&download=1&version=1&vjs=1&skin=4&auto=0&share=1&fonts=Helvetica&download=1&rtl=0

Opening Banter: HT talks about doing an interview with a translator.

 

In The Mailbag:

  • Chris from Ohio writes in: What are your plans for Halloween?”
  • Britton from Louisville KY writes in: “What is the difference between a producer and an executive producer? Do they both get best picture oscars if their movie wins?”
    • Peter explains:
      • An Executive Producer is the top executive of the operations, whereas the producer is the manager of the operations.
      • The executive producer prepares the budget and acquires the investors, while the producer makes sure how the budget is properly utilized.
      • The producer hires the people with the right talents and skills for the movie where the producer himself is hired by the Executive Producer.  For the most part, the executive producer has very little to do with the hiring process, aside from hiring the producer.
      • The producer is on set for the entire production (although some films have multiple producers, technical producers and a creative producers), the executive producer is not on set all the time but is used in more of an advisory capacity, overseeing the scripts and marketing.
      • A producer is always eligible for awards in the industry, on the other hand, the Executive producer is not eligible for awards.
      • Sometimes an executive producer is more of a credit than a job.
  • Damon P. from St. Louis, MO writes in “I was wondering, since many of the team reads books that are movies or will eventually be movies, if they believe that breaking up a film into two parts (think Deathly Hallows, or Mockingjay) to make a book more complete in film format is a good thing.  So many times we hear “The book is better” why is that? Is that because the movies are limited by time, to incorporate additional plots points or anything like that. Would it be better to break a movie into two (or three) parts in order to give the source material it’s due?”
  • Leanne R. from LA writes in “Here’s a quick mailbag question that occurred to me as I was listening to the 12/21 episode: what are the best films directed by & starring the same person? (or to widen the field, including the director as a minor role? e.g., Tarantino or Mel Gibson films)”
    • Peter: Well first of all I think we should discount cameos (M Night, Tarantino…etc). Ben Affleck (Town, Argo) although I feel when hes not in the movie his films are better (Gone Baby Gone)
    • HT: Citizen Kane, Life is Beautiful
    • Chris: Unforgiven, A Star Is Born, Dick Tracy, Do The Right Thing
    • Jacob: Citizen Kane, Unforgiven, lots of Buster Keaton/Charlie Chaplin movies
    • Ben: The Outlaw Josey Wales, High Plains Drifter, A Quiet Place, Rocky sequels
  • Drew from Houston, TX writes in “Hey /Film Daily team,  I really enjoyed the conversation about becoming a film writer. I had another question taking that one step further for those on the site who write reviews: what is your process? Obviously it’s hard to take notes when watching a film in theaters. Do you create an outline before diving into a review? Does Chris take notes when reviewing tv shows or blu-rays before writing his review? Just curious to hear a little more about the process.  Thanks!”

All the other stuff you need to know:

  • You can find more about all the stories we mentioned on today’s show at slashfilm.com, and linked inside the show notes.
  • /Film Daily is published every weekday, bringing you the most exciting news from the world of movies and television as well as deeper dives into the great features from slashfilm.com.
  • You can subscribe to /Film Daily on iTunes, Google Play, Overcast, Spotify and all the popular podcast apps (RSS).
  • Send your feedback, questions, comments and concerns to us at peter@slashfilm.com. Please leave your name and general geographic location in case we mention the e-mail on the air.
  • Please rate and review the podcast on iTunes, tell your friends and spread the word!
  • Thanks to Sam Hume for our logo.

The post Mailbag: Producer/Executive Producer Differences, Review Writing Process, Film Adaptations, Halloween Plans, Translated Interviews & More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/mailbag-producer-executive-producer-differences-review-writing-process-film-adaptations-halloween-plans-translated-interviews-more/

‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Featurette: How the Stars Became Queen

bohemian rhapsody featurette

Becoming a rock icon is always a difficult job, but playing one that’s still living? That’s a Herculean task that each of the stars, with the exception of Rami Malek, had to take on in Bohemian Rhapsody. That’s the equivalent of playing Mozart’s concertos while Mozart watches you like a hawk. But Gwilym Lee, Joseph Mazzello, and Ben Hardy were up to the task, as shown in the latest Bohemian Rhapsody featurette released by 20th Century Fox.

Bohemian Rhapsody Featurette

Rami Malek has been getting all the attention in the lead-up to the release of Bohemian Rhapsody, but 20th Century Fox wants to remind you that there were three other talented members of Queen — all of whom are still alive. Brian May and Roger Taylor are both actively involved in the biopic of the rock band, acting as creative consultants. Early on, their heavy hand in production has sparked concerns over the film becoming a hagiography, but as the film evolved, it (hopefully) seems like that’s not the case.

But the latest Bohemian Rhapsody featurette brings the other Queen members back into the spotlight, with Lee, Mazzello, and Hardy speaking about playing the rock band members and mastering their instruments. “We all worked really hard to master our instruments as best we could,” Lee said in the featurette.

“We knew that we couldn’t fake it,” Mazzello added.

May and Taylor of course came on board to give their on-screen counterparts some tips. “I find myself looking at the edits, and I do kind of believe he’s me,” May said of Lee.

Bohemian Rhapsody is directed by Bryan Singer based on a script by Anthony McCarten. It also stars Lucy Boynton, Aidan Gillen, Tom Hollander, Allen Leech, and Mike Myers.

Here is the synopsis for Bohemian Rhapsody:

Bohemian Rhapsody is a foot-stomping celebration of Queen, their music and their extraordinary lead singer Freddie Mercury. Freddie defied stereotypes and shattered convention to become one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. The film traces the meteoric rise of the band through their iconic songs and revolutionary sound. They reach unparalleled success, but in an unexpected turn Freddie, surrounded by darker influences, shuns Queen in pursuit of his solo career. Having suffered greatly without the collaboration of Queen, Freddie manages to reunite with his bandmates just in time for Live Aid. While bravely facing a recent AIDS diagnosis, Freddie leads the band in one of the greatest performances in the history of rock music. Queen cements a legacy that continues to inspire outsiders, dreamers and music lovers to this day.

Bohemian Rhapsody opens in theaters on November 2, 2018.

The post ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Featurette: How the Stars Became Queen appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/bohemian-rhapsody-featurette-queen/

Why Jet Li Turned Down a Role in ‘The Matrix’

jet li the matrix

The Matrix seemed like a franchise tailor-made for Jet Li. The Wachowskis‘ mind-bending sci-fi series that began in 1999 featured brooding heroes in black coats with insane martial arts skills — all elements that Li had down pat.

And the Chinese action star was actually offered a part as Seraph in The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions, only to turn it down. But he has a good reason for turning down a part in the defining sci-fi franchise of the ’90s and early 2000s.

In a recent interview with Abacus News, Li revealed that the reason he turned down the role of Seraph in 2003’s The Matrix Reloaded was related to the technology cautionary tale that the Matrix franchise was warning against. Li didn’t want the film’s Hollywood producers to “own” his martial arts moves as intellectual property and possibly digitally reproduce them with another person’s face:

“I realized the Americans wanted me to film for three months but be with the crew for nine. And for six months, they wanted to record and copy all my moves into a digital library. By the end of the recording, the right to these moves would go to them.

I was thinking: I’ve been training my entire life. And we martial artists could only grow older. Yet they could own [my moves] as an intellectual property forever. So I said I couldn’t do that.”

That’s something that probably didn’t even occur to fans of The Matrix, but that’s Jet Li for you, thinking five steps ahead. While digital effects in the early 2000s probably couldn’t have accurately created a digital doppelgänger that could imitate Li’s fighting style, the technology today probably could. And let’s not forget that a whole conceit of The Matrix is the ability to “download” kung fu moves into one’s brain.

After Li turned down The Matrix, the role of Seraph went to Taiwanese actor and martial artist Collin Chou, who played the character in both The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. Interestingly, Li wasn’t even the first actor to turn down that role — Seraph was originally written as a woman with the Wachowskis approaching Michelle Yeoh to play it. She ultimately turned down the role due to scheduling conflicts.

Li has been out of the spotlight since last appearing in a Hollywood film in 2014’s The Expendables 3. He’ll next be seen in Disney’s live-action Mulan, set to hit theaters on March 27, 2020.

The post Why Jet Li Turned Down a Role in ‘The Matrix’ appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/jet-li-the-matrix-turned-down/

‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Director Peyton Reed Discusses Notes From Kevin Feige and His Days Playing in a Smiths Cover Band [Interview]

Peyton Reed interview

Peyton Reed, the director of Down with Love and drummer of a long defunct Smiths cover band, once again brought some feel-good laughs to the Marvel Cinematic Universe with Ant-Man and the Wasp. The sequel was a bit bigger, a little looser, and even Scott Lang was funnier, but Reed and all involved still managed to keep it as contained and as cleanly told as the first movie. Reed’s Ant-Man still ain’t going big for the sake of going big.

Reed basically made what was a large-scale studio comedy with more emphasis on laughs than action. Ant-Man and the Wasp is a buddy comedy, not another save the world story. With smaller but more personal stakes, Reed delivered a sequel that does a lot more than check boxes. We recently had a brief conversation with the director about the sequel, mostly focused on his days in a Smiths cover band, notes from Marvel President Kevin Feige, working with Evangeline Lilly, and two of his past movies.


The Cure’s “Disintegration” was the first CD you bought, so that was a personal song you picked for the first movie. For Ant-Man and The Wasp, did you use any songs that are particularly meaningful to you?

Yeah, a couple. I mean, the whole idea of Luis’s grandma having a jukebox, and only played Morrissey stuff. That was another band, I was waiting to dismiss, I saw them early on and then so many years later, I’m a drummer and I played for a brief time in Smiths a cover band called, Louder than Bombs.

We played a handful of shows and the time we played at Spaceland in Silver Lake, when it was still Spaceland [now The Satellite], and some kid came up after the show and was like, “Aww man, you guys were really good, but have you heard this other Smiths cover band, Sweet and Tender Hooligan,” and I said no, and I’d never heard of them. And he said, “You should check them out.” I went and checked them out and, of course, they’re like an all Hispanic Smiths cover band and they had a massive following, and I think that was the first time I learned really about kind of the very specific following that he has in Los Angeles. So much so, that he moved from Manchester at some point to L.A., and started writing songs to those specific fans, and it seemed like a perfect bit of arcane knowledge and detail for Luis’s life.

So that’s definitely one. And then the inclusion of “Come On Get Happy,” the Partridge Family theme in the movie. As a kid that was a show that I grew up on, and just tonally we all liked it, and Rudd liked it, so that kinda became the Scott Lang sort of everything’s okay. If we did a montage through the beginning as he’s sort of marking time on house arrest, and then we reprise it at the end almost as sort of a mislead to what’s about to happen in the mid credit scene. So, yeah. Those two definitely have some personal connections for me.

That’s great. Do you still have any recordings of when you were in that Smiths cover band? 

I think we do have some audio recordings, and I know there’s definitely some still photos of a show at Spaceland, and the reason … I mean, it was only a short term endeavor anyway. We were going to do a whole thing where for a couple months we’re gonna be a Smiths cover band, and the next couple months we were gonna be an R.E.M. cover band. We were gonna be really specific about cover band stuff. But then it all splitted, and we all got jobs and were working, so we never had time.

That sounds like it was a good time, though. With Ant-Man and the Wasp, how did your conversations with Evangeline Lilly on the first movie and leading up to the sequel influenced the Wasp? 

I wanted to have her as involved as she was willing and able to be because I think she has a real personal investment in that character, and even as we were started to shape the story beats about what it could be, and hit upon this idea of starting it in The Wasp where they’re estranged as a result of the events in Civil War.

I wanted to run things past her at every stage of the game, and we had lots of conversations about once Hope Van Dyne gets the suit and becomes Wasp. Everything about her. What’s her attitude toward being a hero? And her physicality, and all those things. So I really welcomed Evangeline’s point-of-view because it was crucial. I mean, she was gonna be the person front and center playing that character, and for me it’s always good to involve those actors that you know are gonna be a part of the process. Involve them early on. One, because I think they just get more invested in the character, and two, you’re gonna have these conversations at some point, and you’d rather not be always on the day of shooting just trying to figure something out. So, her point-of-view was incredibly valuable. I would say crucial for me.

Ant-Man and the Wasp Box Office

What’s a note from Kevin Feige usually look like? 

I think they can kinda come in different forms. The notes are always very smart. Whether you agree or disagree with his notes, he comes from a really smart place, and they come from someone who has no desire to repeat themselves, and really his chief goal is to entertain and surprise an audience. So they can come in different forms, and really as we’re in the very beginning trying to formulate the story.

It can be things we talk about like, here’s a piece of imagery that as a fan could we get this, or what if this were the case? What if we know we want to progress the Scott, Cassie relationship? What if we start dropping hints about she really is her father’s daughter, and things like that. And that can be on the backend of things and very, very specific moments as we cut screens, and things about whether jokes are played or not, or conceptual things. And it’s miraculous that he’s able to do that in a way that never feels like annoying studio meddling. I think it’s just because we all come from a place of wanting these things to kind of … You know, Ant-Man and the Wasp is the twentieth MCU movie? So you really have to kind of pivot and try and mix things up.

You wanted Scott Lang to be funnier and less of the straight man role in the sequel. For Scott and the rest of the characters, do you know where you want to see their arcs end? Is it a trilogy in your mind? 

I personally do have a trilogy arc in mind for them. Some of which I share with Marvel, and some of which I haven’t. But definitely where we kind of tool those characters in the second movie was very much in line with what I want to do, and I know specifics of Scott Lang was something that Paul and I talked a lot about is that in the first movie, particularly the first half of Ant-Man, he’s a little more laconic and straight forward, and a bit more straight man. And it was really kind establishing Paul Rudd as an action hero. That was something, and audiences had never seen him in that type of role. But the second time out we could have had the luxury of knowing that audiences have accepted that character. So we could really allow that character, Scott Lang, to be even funnier and take him in a direction where he’s sort of a step behind. He’s a little bit more of the … Big Lebowski-style. A little bit more Jeff Bridges.

Good comparison. I wanted to ask you about two of your earlier movies, Down with Love and Bring it On. For Down with Love, what was it like just having the opportunity to make a movie in that style? 

I think for me the thing was that it was really the certain style exercise we were doing because it is a very heightened genre of filmmaking, and it was a very tactile style of filmmaking, and there were visual effects in the movie but they were mostly mats and lights and things like that, but I loved it just because it felt like the spirit in which we were making that movie really did mirror the spirit they would’ve made it in the early sixties. Nobody had trailers. We had dressing rooms. I have great memories of making that movie. I mean, it was a tough movie to make in the studio system because it’s a strange movie, but I’m very, very proud of that movie. I really am proud of that movie, and sometimes I look back on it on these years later and it feels like a miracle that it got made.

It’s a great movie. I remember how popular Bring it On was when it came out, but when did you first realize all the love people have for that movie? Was it evident right away? 

I think it was later on. I know the opening night of that movie I remember really vividly because we were going out to audiences with a high school cheerleading comedy, and it really could have gone either way. And I just remember opening night being with Kirsten [Dunst] and [writer] Jessica Bendinger, and driving around the theaters, and seeing that people had actually showed up, and seeing that people seemed to be reacting. That’s the first sense I got that actually like wow, maybe this movie is gonna work for audiences. But in terms of the long term appeal of the movie, that’s certainly something I couldn’t have anticipated. I think every filmmaker hopes for that, but I like to think that it’s because hopefully we were maybe a little more forward-thinking about the attitudes in the movie and some of the subject matter that we go with, but you just never know. There’s no way to anticipate how a movie’s gonna connect with an audience.

***

Ant-Man and the Wasp is now available on Blu-ray.

The post ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Director Peyton Reed Discusses Notes From Kevin Feige and His Days Playing in a Smiths Cover Band [Interview] appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/peyton-reed-interview/

HBO’s ‘Room 104’ Season 2 Debuts November 9, Stars Michael Shannon, Mahershala Ali, Judy Greer, and More

Room 104 season 2

The first season of HBO’s anthology series Room 104 was uneven, but showed a lot of promise. Each episode takes place inside the same motel room, but that’s essentially the only requirement: genres, characters, styles, and tones are all up for grabs depending on the episode’s individual story, and season one served up a varied meal of period pieces, Mormon missionaries, an MMA-style brawl, and a pants-less Santa Claus, just to name a few.

Room 104 season 2 will hit HBO on November 9, 2018, and the full cast and list of writers and directors has been revealed, and things are about to get very interesting behind the door of that motel room.

Creators and executive producers Jay and Mark Duplass are back for more Room 104, and they’ve enlisted a terrific batched of talent to help them out, including actors like Mahershala Ali, Michael Shannon, Judy Greer, Rainn Wilson, Brian Tyree Henry, and Katie Aselton, and directors like Patrick Brice (Creep), Gaby Hoffmann (Transparent), Mark Duplass, and more.

Here’s a full list of all twelve episodes for this season, and descriptions of who’s starring in, writing, and directing each one:

Episode #13: “FOMO”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 9 (11:30 p.m.-midnight ET/PT)

Grace (Charlyne Yi) and her friends (Tom Lenk and Pia Shah) take a weekend trip to celebrate Grace’s 30th birthday, only to be surprised by the arrival of her uninvited sister (Jennifer Lafleur).

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Ross Partridge

 

Episode #14: “Mr. Mulvahill”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 9 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

Jim (Rainn Wilson) reunites with Mr. Mulvahill (Frank Birney), his third-grade teacher, and challenges him to admit to an incident from the past that left Jim forever changed.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Ross Partridge

Episode #15: “Swipe Right”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 16 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A powerful Russian political technologist (Michael Shannon) arranges an internet first date with a veterinary nurse (Judy Greer), who tries to figure out the truth behind his shifting identity.

Written and directed by Liza Johnson

 

Episode #16: “Hungry”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 16 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

Two strangers (Mark Proksch and Kent Osborne) meet to fulfill an unusual mutual fantasy.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Patrick Brice

Episode #17: “The Woman in the Wall”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 23 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

Plagued by a host of ailments, Catherine (Dolly Wells) is comforted by a disembodied woman’s voice (Leonora Pitts).

Story by Esti Giordani; teleplay by Mark Duplass; directed by Gaby Hoffmann

Episode #18: “Arnold”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 23 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

After waking up soaking wet and with no memory of the previous night, Arnold (Brian Tyree Henry) tries to piece together the events that got him to Room 104.

Written by Mark Duplass & Julian Wass; directed by Julian Wass

Episode #19: “The Man and the Baby and the Man”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 30 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A couple (Josephine Decker and Onur Tukel) hoping to conceive makes a video of their emotionally-charged night for their future child.

Story by Josephine Decker; teleplay by Josephine Decker & Onur Tukel; directed by Josephine Decker

Episode #20: “A Nightmare”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 30 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A woman (Natalie Morales) finds herself trapped in increasingly terrifying versions of the same nightmare.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Jonah Markowitz

Episode #21: “The Return”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 7 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

Grieving the death of her father months earlier in Room 104, a young girl (Abby Ryder Fortson) returns with her mother (Stephanie Allynne) in hopes of being able to communicate with him.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by So Yong Kim

Episode #22: “Artificial”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 7 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A reporter (Sheaun McKinney) looks to uncover the truth about a woman (Katie Aselton) who claims to be a hybrid robot warning of an impending AI takeover.

Written by Mark Duplass; Directed by Natalie Morales

Episode #23: “Shark”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 14 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A charismatic pool shark (Mahershala Ali) tries to convince his reluctant cousin (James Earl) to stay in the hustling game.

Written and directed by Mark Duplass

Episode #24: “Josie & Me” (Season finale)

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 14 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A woman (Mary Wiseman) asks her slightly-younger self to recreate the events of one night at a college frat party.

Written by Lauren Budd; directed by Lila Neugebauer

On paper, the most exciting episodes in this batch look to be “Swipe Right,” which features Michael Shannon and Judy Greer acting together, and “The Man and the Baby and the Man,” which is written by, directed by, and stars Josephine Decker, whose film Madeline’s Madeline has received incredible reviews as it played on the festival circuit.

We reviewed every episode of the first season of Room 104 here, so be sure to check those out if you missed them.

The post HBO’s ‘Room 104’ Season 2 Debuts November 9, Stars Michael Shannon, Mahershala Ali, Judy Greer, and More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/room-104-season-2/

HBO’s ‘Room 104’ Season 2 Debuts November 9, Stars Michael Shannon, Mahershala Ali, Judy Greer, and More

Room 104 season 2

The first season of HBO’s anthology series Room 104 was uneven, but showed a lot of promise. Each episode takes place inside the same motel room, but that’s essentially the only requirement: genres, characters, styles, and tones are all up for grabs depending on the episode’s individual story, and season one served up a varied meal of period pieces, Mormon missionaries, an MMA-style brawl, and a pants-less Santa Claus, just to name a few.

Room 104 season 2 will hit HBO on November 9, 2018, and the full cast and list of writers and directors has been revealed, and things are about to get very interesting behind the door of that motel room.

Creators and executive producers Jay and Mark Duplass are back for more Room 104, and they’ve enlisted a terrific batched of talent to help them out, including actors like Mahershala Ali, Michael Shannon, Judy Greer, Rainn Wilson, Brian Tyree Henry, and Katie Aselton, and directors like Patrick Brice (Creep), Gaby Hoffmann (Transparent), Mark Duplass, and more.

Here’s a full list of all twelve episodes for this season, and descriptions of who’s starring in, writing, and directing each one:

Episode #13: “FOMO”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 9 (11:30 p.m.-midnight ET/PT)

Grace (Charlyne Yi) and her friends (Tom Lenk and Pia Shah) take a weekend trip to celebrate Grace’s 30th birthday, only to be surprised by the arrival of her uninvited sister (Jennifer Lafleur).

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Ross Partridge

 

Episode #14: “Mr. Mulvahill”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 9 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

Jim (Rainn Wilson) reunites with Mr. Mulvahill (Frank Birney), his third-grade teacher, and challenges him to admit to an incident from the past that left Jim forever changed.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Ross Partridge

Episode #15: “Swipe Right”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 16 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A powerful Russian political technologist (Michael Shannon) arranges an internet first date with a veterinary nurse (Judy Greer), who tries to figure out the truth behind his shifting identity.

Written and directed by Liza Johnson

 

Episode #16: “Hungry”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 16 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

Two strangers (Mark Proksch and Kent Osborne) meet to fulfill an unusual mutual fantasy.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Patrick Brice

Episode #17: “The Woman in the Wall”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 23 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

Plagued by a host of ailments, Catherine (Dolly Wells) is comforted by a disembodied woman’s voice (Leonora Pitts).

Story by Esti Giordani; teleplay by Mark Duplass; directed by Gaby Hoffmann

Episode #18: “Arnold”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 23 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

After waking up soaking wet and with no memory of the previous night, Arnold (Brian Tyree Henry) tries to piece together the events that got him to Room 104.

Written by Mark Duplass & Julian Wass; directed by Julian Wass

Episode #19: “The Man and the Baby and the Man”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 30 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A couple (Josephine Decker and Onur Tukel) hoping to conceive makes a video of their emotionally-charged night for their future child.

Story by Josephine Decker; teleplay by Josephine Decker & Onur Tukel; directed by Josephine Decker

Episode #20: “A Nightmare”

Debut: FRIDAY, NOV. 30 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A woman (Natalie Morales) finds herself trapped in increasingly terrifying versions of the same nightmare.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by Jonah Markowitz

Episode #21: “The Return”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 7 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

Grieving the death of her father months earlier in Room 104, a young girl (Abby Ryder Fortson) returns with her mother (Stephanie Allynne) in hopes of being able to communicate with him.

Written by Mark Duplass; directed by So Yong Kim

Episode #22: “Artificial”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 7 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A reporter (Sheaun McKinney) looks to uncover the truth about a woman (Katie Aselton) who claims to be a hybrid robot warning of an impending AI takeover.

Written by Mark Duplass; Directed by Natalie Morales

Episode #23: “Shark”

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 14 (11:30 p.m.-midnight)

A charismatic pool shark (Mahershala Ali) tries to convince his reluctant cousin (James Earl) to stay in the hustling game.

Written and directed by Mark Duplass

Episode #24: “Josie & Me” (Season finale)

Debut: FRIDAY, DEC. 14 (midnight-12:30 a.m.)

A woman (Mary Wiseman) asks her slightly-younger self to recreate the events of one night at a college frat party.

Written by Lauren Budd; directed by Lila Neugebauer

On paper, the most exciting episodes in this batch look to be “Swipe Right,” which features Michael Shannon and Judy Greer acting together, and “The Man and the Baby and the Man,” which is written by, directed by, and stars Josephine Decker, whose film Madeline’s Madeline has received incredible reviews as it played on the festival circuit.

We reviewed every episode of the first season of Room 104 here, so be sure to check those out if you missed them.

The post HBO’s ‘Room 104’ Season 2 Debuts November 9, Stars Michael Shannon, Mahershala Ali, Judy Greer, and More appeared first on /Film.

from /Film https://www.slashfilm.com/room-104-season-2/