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Film

#myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench

“This is the true side of what has happened to this community, and we are all a living testament. We are here, and we are going to tell the story for everyone to hear.”

I first came across Rocks at Whiskey Trench as supplemental course material during my undergrad. Initially, I was interested in the film because it spotlighted an element of the Oka Crisis of 1990, an event that had a profound impact on Indigenous people throughout Turtle Island, including my community.

Though Piikani First Nation is thousands of kilometres away from Kanesatake or Kahnawake, word of the crisis spread like wildfire and seared itself on the collective memory of the people.

The Oka Crisis opened a wound that could no longer be ignored, a wound that stretched between Indigenous and non-Indigenous, a wound that festered as the fears of people were ignited by the discourse from mainstream media and the Canadian government.

As I watched the film, I was struck with the blatant racism of throwing rocks at elders, women, and children as they were fleeing their community.

Rocks at Whiskey Trench, by Alanis Obomsawin

I was struck with the apathy of police officers who failed to stop a mob of Quebecois from picking up these rocks—some of which I would call small boulders—and aiming them at those seeking safety. As the film progressed, I became overwhelmed with a creeping tension. Could something like this happen now?

It already was. It was the fall of 2016, and frictions in Standing Rock around the Dakota Access Pipeline had reached a pinnacle. As I sat watching a film about a crisis that happened 26 years prior, Indigenous people were in a fight for their lives, for their territories, and most profoundly, for their sovereignty. This realization had me gutted.

Although much can be said about the suffering and hardship endured by Indigenous people in these conflicts, there is also much to be said about resiliency and strength.

These events saw a collective awakening and brought together Indigenous and non-Indigenous nations from across the world. These events serve as a reminder that time does not protect us from the harms of history. We cannot afford to stand by idly and forget these injustices.

I have recommended this film to many people, and it’s because Rocks at Whiskey Trench carries a critical message. History is cyclical. The conversation continues in this era of “reconciliation”—deny it as we might, we are still on that cusp.

Be it rocks or rubber bullets, one thing remains the same: physical force cannot deplete the memory of a people, nor their spirit. The fight continues.

By Amber Bedard


Watch Rocks at Whiskey Trench :

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/rocks_at_whiskey_trench/

 

The post #myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/12/mynfb-rocks-at-whiskey-trench-amber-bedard/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

#myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

“This is the true side of what has happened to this community, and we are all a living testament. We are here, and we are going to tell the story for everyone to hear.”

I first came across Rocks at Whiskey Trench as supplemental course material during my undergrad. Initially, I was interested in the film because it spotlighted an element of the Oka Crisis of 1990, an event that had a profound impact on Indigenous people throughout Turtle Island, including my community.

Though Piikani First Nation is thousands of kilometres away from Kanesatake or Kahnawake, word of the crisis spread like wildfire and seared itself on the collective memory of the people.

The Oka Crisis opened a wound that could no longer be ignored, a wound that stretched between Indigenous and non-Indigenous, a wound that festered as the fears of people were ignited by the discourse from mainstream media and the Canadian government.

As I watched the film, I was struck with the blatant racism of throwing rocks at elders, women, and children as they were fleeing their community.

Rocks at Whiskey Trench, by Alanis Obomsawin

I was struck with the apathy of police officers who failed to stop a mob of Quebecois from picking up these rocks—some of which I would call small boulders—and aiming them at those seeking safety. As the film progressed, I became overwhelmed with a creeping tension. Could something like this happen now?

It already was. It was the fall of 2016, and frictions in Standing Rock around the Dakota Access Pipeline had reached a pinnacle. As I sat watching a film about a crisis that happened 26 years prior, Indigenous people were in a fight for their lives, for their territories, and most profoundly, for their sovereignty. This realization had me gutted.

Although much can be said about the suffering and hardship endured by Indigenous people in these conflicts, there is also much to be said about resiliency and strength.

These events saw a collective awakening and brought together Indigenous and non-Indigenous nations from across the world. These events serve as a reminder that time does not protect us from the harms of history. We cannot afford to stand by idly and forget these injustices.

I have recommended this film to many people, and it’s because Rocks at Whiskey Trench carries a critical message. History is cyclical. The conversation continues in this era of “reconciliation”—deny it as we might, we are still on that cusp.

Be it rocks or rubber bullets, one thing remains the same: physical force cannot deplete the memory of a people, nor their spirit. The fight continues.

By Amber Bedard


Watch Rocks at Whiskey Trench :

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/rocks_at_whiskey_trench/

 

The post #myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/12/mynfb-rocks-at-whiskey-trench-amber-bedard/

Film

#myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench

“This is the true side of what has happened to this community, and we are all a living testament. We are here, and we are going to tell the story for everyone to hear.”

I first came across Rocks at Whiskey Trench as supplemental course material during my undergrad. Initially, I was interested in the film because it spotlighted an element of the Oka Crisis of 1990, an event that had a profound impact on Indigenous people throughout Turtle Island, including my community.

Though Piikani First Nation is thousands of kilometres away from Kanesatake or Kahnawake, word of the crisis spread like wildfire and seared itself on the collective memory of the people.

The Oka Crisis opened a wound that could no longer be ignored, a wound that stretched between Indigenous and non-Indigenous, a wound that festered as the fears of people were ignited by the discourse from mainstream media and the Canadian government.

As I watched the film, I was struck with the blatant racism of throwing rocks at elders, women, and children as they were fleeing their community.

Rocks at Whiskey Trench, by Alanis Obomsawin

I was struck with the apathy of police officers who failed to stop a mob of Quebecois from picking up these rocks—some of which I would call small boulders—and aiming them at those seeking safety. As the film progressed, I became overwhelmed with a creeping tension. Could something like this happen now?

It already was. It was the fall of 2016, and frictions in Standing Rock around the Dakota Access Pipeline had reached a pinnacle. As I sat watching a film about a crisis that happened 26 years prior, Indigenous people were in a fight for their lives, for their territories, and most profoundly, for their sovereignty. This realization had me gutted.

Although much can be said about the suffering and hardship endured by Indigenous people in these conflicts, there is also much to be said about resiliency and strength.

These events saw a collective awakening and brought together Indigenous and non-Indigenous nations from across the world. These events serve as a reminder that time does not protect us from the harms of history. We cannot afford to stand by idly and forget these injustices.

I have recommended this film to many people, and it’s because Rocks at Whiskey Trench carries a critical message. History is cyclical. The conversation continues in this era of “reconciliation”—deny it as we might, we are still on that cusp.

Be it rocks or rubber bullets, one thing remains the same: physical force cannot deplete the memory of a people, nor their spirit. The fight continues.

By Amber Bedard


Watch Rocks at Whiskey Trench :

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/rocks_at_whiskey_trench/

 

The post #myNFB: Remembering the Oka Crisis with Rocks at Whiskey Trench appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/12/mynfb-rocks-at-whiskey-trench-amber-bedard/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Hedgehog’s Home: Exploring Home and Relationships

Theme: Values

Grades: 5-6

Keywords/Topics: Empowerment, peer pressure, bullying, security, friendships, virtues, independence, poetry, homes, values

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

Lesson’s main inquiry: How do values shape our beliefs, and how do they change over time?

Summary: The animated short film Hedgehog’s Home is based on a poem by Bosnian author Branko Ćopić. In this retelling, Hedgehog (the main character) is deeply attached to his home and unwaveringly defends the simple peace it brings him. Fox, Wolf, Bear and Wild Boar simply can’t understand his attachment. What ensues is a journey of self-discovery, steadfast convictions and tragic endings! The filmmaker creatively uses rhyme, lulling the viewers into the sometimes not-so-gentle conversations between the characters. This literary device engages the viewers in this fable as they await the fate of this motley crew.

1) How do values affect relationships?

Clip #1

Activities

  • Define the word “values.” Discuss the moral messages embedded within the film.
  • List the values portrayed in the film.
  • Create and label a two-circle Venn diagram sorting the animals’ values into positive or negative attributes.
  • Rank the values in order of desirability. Is your list the same as that of your peers? How are they the same or different?
  • List the qualities you value most in a person.
  • Write a letter to one of the characters explaining why they should change their behaviour(s) and the potential impact those changes would have on those around them.

Go Deeper

Hedgehog stands up for his beliefs. Discuss the traits of a good leader. Learn about leaders (past and present) and the impact they’ve had on society. Is there a leader in your community who inspires you?

2) What makes a house a home?

Clip #2

Activities

  • Discuss the clip. What does Hedgehog value about his home? Can you relate to his monologue?
  • Answer the following question using the shape-poem format: “Why is your home important to you?”
  • Interview five people. Discuss their responses to the question “What makes a house a home”?
  • Discuss the proverb “Home is where the heart is.”
  • Draw a picture of your home or a special place within your home and create a proverb or idiom to represent that space.

Go Deeper

Research the importance of children’s rights with reference to the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child. Discuss what it says about a child’s right to a home. What action can you or your class take to help ease the plight of refugees or the homeless?

3) How do values change over time?

Clip #3

Activities

  • Discuss Fox’s statement depicted in the clip.
  • Predict how Fox’s epiphany will affect how he acts/lives his life in the future.
  • Divide the class into two groups. Debate the literal and philosophical meaning of the word “rich.” Use examples from the video to support your arguments.

Go Deeper

Write a dialogue (no longer than one page) that takes place between Hedgehog and Fox one year later. How has Fox’s epiphany changed his life?

The post Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/11/mini-lesson-hedgehogs-home/

Film

Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Hedgehog’s Home: Exploring Home and Relationships

Theme: Values

Grades: 5-6

Keywords/Topics: Empowerment, peer pressure, bullying, security, friendships, virtues, independence, poetry, homes, values

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

Lesson’s main inquiry: How do values shape our beliefs, and how do they change over time?

Summary: The animated short film Hedgehog’s Home is based on a poem by Bosnian author Branko Ćopić. In this retelling, Hedgehog (the main character) is deeply attached to his home and unwaveringly defends the simple peace it brings him. Fox, Wolf, Bear and Wild Boar simply can’t understand his attachment. What ensues is a journey of self-discovery, steadfast convictions and tragic endings! The filmmaker creatively uses rhyme, lulling the viewers into the sometimes not-so-gentle conversations between the characters. This literary device engages the viewers in this fable as they await the fate of this motley crew.

1) How do values affect relationships?

Clip #1

Activities

  • Define the word “values.” Discuss the moral messages embedded within the film.
  • List the values portrayed in the film.
  • Create and label a two-circle Venn diagram sorting the animals’ values into positive or negative attributes.
  • Rank the values in order of desirability. Is your list the same as that of your peers? How are they the same or different?
  • List the qualities you value most in a person.
  • Write a letter to one of the characters explaining why they should change their behaviour(s) and the potential impact those changes would have on those around them.

Go Deeper

Hedgehog stands up for his beliefs. Discuss the traits of a good leader. Learn about leaders (past and present) and the impact they’ve had on society. Is there a leader in your community who inspires you?

2) What makes a house a home?

Clip #2

Activities

  • Discuss the clip. What does Hedgehog value about his home? Can you relate to his monologue?
  • Answer the following question using the shape-poem format: “Why is your home important to you?”
  • Interview five people. Discuss their responses to the question “What makes a house a home”?
  • Discuss the proverb “Home is where the heart is.”
  • Draw a picture of your home or a special place within your home and create a proverb or idiom to represent that space.

Go Deeper

Research the importance of children’s rights with reference to the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child. Discuss what it says about a child’s right to a home. What action can you or your class take to help ease the plight of refugees or the homeless?

3) How do values change over time?

Clip #3

Activities

  • Discuss Fox’s statement depicted in the clip.
  • Predict how Fox’s epiphany will affect how he acts/lives his life in the future.
  • Divide the class into two groups. Debate the literal and philosophical meaning of the word “rich.” Use examples from the video to support your arguments.

Go Deeper

Write a dialogue (no longer than one page) that takes place between Hedgehog and Fox one year later. How has Fox’s epiphany changed his life?

The post Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/11/mini-lesson-hedgehogs-home/

Film

Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home

Hedgehog’s Home: Exploring Home and Relationships

Theme: Values

Grades: 5-6

Keywords/Topics: Empowerment, peer pressure, bullying, security, friendships, virtues, independence, poetry, homes, values

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

Lesson’s main inquiry: How do values shape our beliefs, and how do they change over time?

Summary: The animated short film Hedgehog’s Home is based on a poem by Bosnian author Branko Ćopić. In this retelling, Hedgehog (the main character) is deeply attached to his home and unwaveringly defends the simple peace it brings him. Fox, Wolf, Bear and Wild Boar simply can’t understand his attachment. What ensues is a journey of self-discovery, steadfast convictions and tragic endings! The filmmaker creatively uses rhyme, lulling the viewers into the sometimes not-so-gentle conversations between the characters. This literary device engages the viewers in this fable as they await the fate of this motley crew.

1) How do values affect relationships?

Clip #1

Activities

  • Define the word “values.” Discuss the moral messages embedded within the film.
  • List the values portrayed in the film.
  • Create and label a two-circle Venn diagram sorting the animals’ values into positive or negative attributes.
  • Rank the values in order of desirability. Is your list the same as that of your peers? How are they the same or different?
  • List the qualities you value most in a person.
  • Write a letter to one of the characters explaining why they should change their behaviour(s) and the potential impact those changes would have on those around them.

Go Deeper

Hedgehog stands up for his beliefs. Discuss the traits of a good leader. Learn about leaders (past and present) and the impact they’ve had on society. Is there a leader in your community who inspires you?

2) What makes a house a home?

Clip #2

Activities

  • Discuss the clip. What does Hedgehog value about his home? Can you relate to his monologue?
  • Answer the following question using the shape-poem format: “Why is your home important to you?”
  • Interview five people. Discuss their responses to the question “What makes a house a home”?
  • Discuss the proverb “Home is where the heart is.”
  • Draw a picture of your home or a special place within your home and create a proverb or idiom to represent that space.

Go Deeper

Research the importance of children’s rights with reference to the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child. Discuss what it says about a child’s right to a home. What action can you or your class take to help ease the plight of refugees or the homeless?

3) How do values change over time?

Clip #3

Activities

  • Discuss Fox’s statement depicted in the clip.
  • Predict how Fox’s epiphany will affect how he acts/lives his life in the future.
  • Divide the class into two groups. Debate the literal and philosophical meaning of the word “rich.” Use examples from the video to support your arguments.

Go Deeper

Write a dialogue (no longer than one page) that takes place between Hedgehog and Fox one year later. How has Fox’s epiphany changed his life?

The post Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/11/mini-lesson-hedgehogs-home/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Hedgehog’s Home: Exploring Home and Relationships

Theme: Values

Grades: 5-6

Keywords/Topics: Empowerment, peer pressure, bullying, security, friendships, virtues, independence, poetry, homes, values

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

Lesson’s main inquiry: How do values shape our beliefs, and how do they change over time?

Summary: The animated short film Hedgehog’s Home is based on a poem by Bosnian author Branko Ćopić. In this retelling, Hedgehog (the main character) is deeply attached to his home and unwaveringly defends the simple peace it brings him. Fox, Wolf, Bear and Wild Boar simply can’t understand his attachment. What ensues is a journey of self-discovery, steadfast convictions and tragic endings! The filmmaker creatively uses rhyme, lulling the viewers into the sometimes not-so-gentle conversations between the characters. This literary device engages the viewers in this fable as they await the fate of this motley crew.

1) How do values affect relationships?

Clip #1

Activities

  • Define the word “values.” Discuss the moral messages embedded within the film.
  • List the values portrayed in the film.
  • Create and label a two-circle Venn diagram sorting the animals’ values into positive or negative attributes.
  • Rank the values in order of desirability. Is your list the same as that of your peers? How are they the same or different?
  • List the qualities you value most in a person.
  • Write a letter to one of the characters explaining why they should change their behaviour(s) and the potential impact those changes would have on those around them.

Go Deeper

Hedgehog stands up for his beliefs. Discuss the traits of a good leader. Learn about leaders (past and present) and the impact they’ve had on society. Is there a leader in your community who inspires you?

2) What makes a house a home?

Clip #2

Activities

  • Discuss the clip. What does Hedgehog value about his home? Can you relate to his monologue?
  • Answer the following question using the shape-poem format: “Why is your home important to you?”
  • Interview five people. Discuss their responses to the question “What makes a house a home”?
  • Discuss the proverb “Home is where the heart is.”
  • Draw a picture of your home or a special place within your home and create a proverb or idiom to represent that space.

Go Deeper

Research the importance of children’s rights with reference to the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child. Discuss what it says about a child’s right to a home. What action can you or your class take to help ease the plight of refugees or the homeless?

3) How do values change over time?

Clip #3

Activities

  • Discuss Fox’s statement depicted in the clip.
  • Predict how Fox’s epiphany will affect how he acts/lives his life in the future.
  • Divide the class into two groups. Debate the literal and philosophical meaning of the word “rich.” Use examples from the video to support your arguments.

Go Deeper

Write a dialogue (no longer than one page) that takes place between Hedgehog and Fox one year later. How has Fox’s epiphany changed his life?

The post Mini-Lesson for December 2018 | Hedgehog’s Home appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/11/mini-lesson-hedgehogs-home/

Film

Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season!

It’s the holiday season! This year, we’ve got some great stuff for the NFB lovers in your life… or for you! Thanks to our partnerships, we’ve got pins, plushies, and books – and they’re on sale!

Do you subscribe to the NFB Education newsletter? If you do, you’ll be getting a special Boxing Day code to buy select items at a discounted price. If you don’t, it’s not too late! Head on over to our subscription page and sign up today!

If you see something you like, click on the image to buy. If you can wait for Boxing Day, then don’t forget to use your discount code!

Happy holidays!

Happy Worker Pins and Plushies

NFB Logo
Madame Tutli-Putli
The Cat Came Back – Cat in a Basket
The Cat Came Back
NFB 3-Pack
NFB Classic Logo
I Like Girls
The Cat Came Back – Angelic Cat
The Big Snit
Cat Came Back
The Log Driver’s Waltz

Firefly Books

Flawed by Andrea Dorfman

Andrea Dorfman’s beautiful short film was first transformed into an interactive project, and now it’s found a third incarnation in book form. A must-have for any girl who’s ever battled with their self-esteem.

George Hunter’s Canada
Threads by Torill Kove

Torill Kove’s latest animated short was one of the first NFB films to be turned into a book. It deals with the complex relationships that bind us together.

The Cat Came Back by Cordell Barker

Of course we’ve got a book version of this Cordell Barker classic – the darn cat just couldn’t stay away.

My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts by Torill Kove

Of the 5 books we’ve done with Firefly, two of them are based on Torill Kove’s films. This one deals with one woman and her tall tales about her service to her country during the war.

The post Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season! appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/10/holiday-2018-sale/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season!

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

It’s the holiday season! This year, we’ve got some great stuff for the NFB lovers in your life… or for you! Thanks to our partnerships, we’ve got pins, plushies, and books – and they’re on sale!

Do you subscribe to the NFB Education newsletter? If you do, you’ll be getting a special Boxing Day code to buy select items at a discounted price. If you don’t, it’s not too late! Head on over to our subscription page and sign up today!

If you see something you like, click on the image to buy. If you can wait for Boxing Day, then don’t forget to use your discount code!

Happy holidays!

Happy Worker Pins and Plushies

NFB Logo
Madame Tutli-Putli
The Cat Came Back – Cat in a Basket
The Cat Came Back
NFB 3-Pack
NFB Classic Logo
I Like Girls
The Cat Came Back – Angelic Cat
The Big Snit
Cat Came Back
The Log Driver’s Waltz

Firefly Books

Flawed by Andrea Dorfman

Andrea Dorfman’s beautiful short film was first transformed into an interactive project, and now it’s found a third incarnation in book form. A must-have for any girl who’s ever battled with their self-esteem.

George Hunter’s Canada
Threads by Torill Kove

Torill Kove’s latest animated short was one of the first NFB films to be turned into a book. It deals with the complex relationships that bind us together.

The Cat Came Back by Cordell Barker

Of course we’ve got a book version of this Cordell Barker classic – the darn cat just couldn’t stay away.

My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts by Torill Kove

Of the 5 books we’ve done with Firefly, two of them are based on Torill Kove’s films. This one deals with one woman and her tall tales about her service to her country during the war.

The post Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season! appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/10/holiday-2018-sale/

Film

Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season!

It’s the holiday season! This year, we’ve got some great stuff for the NFB lovers in your life… or for you! Thanks to our partnerships, we’ve got pins, plushies, and books – and they’re on sale!

Do you subscribe to the NFB Education newsletter? If you do, you’ll be getting a special Boxing Day code to buy select items at a discounted price. If you don’t, it’s not too late! Head on over to our subscription page and sign up today!

If you see something you like, click on the image to buy. If you can wait for Boxing Day, then don’t forget to use your discount code!

Happy holidays!

Happy Worker Pins and Plushies

NFB Logo
Madame Tutli-Putli
The Cat Came Back – Cat in a Basket
The Cat Came Back
NFB 3-Pack
NFB Classic Logo
I Like Girls
The Cat Came Back – Angelic Cat
The Big Snit
Cat Came Back
The Log Driver’s Waltz

Firefly Books

Flawed by Andrea Dorfman

Andrea Dorfman’s beautiful short film was first transformed into an interactive project, and now it’s found a third incarnation in book form. A must-have for any girl who’s ever battled with their self-esteem.

George Hunter’s Canada
Threads by Torill Kove

Torill Kove’s latest animated short was one of the first NFB films to be turned into a book. It deals with the complex relationships that bind us together.

The Cat Came Back by Cordell Barker

Of course we’ve got a book version of this Cordell Barker classic – the darn cat just couldn’t stay away.

My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts by Torill Kove

Of the 5 books we’ve done with Firefly, two of them are based on Torill Kove’s films. This one deals with one woman and her tall tales about her service to her country during the war.

The post Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season! appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/10/holiday-2018-sale/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season!

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

It’s the holiday season! This year, we’ve got some great stuff for the NFB lovers in your life… or for you! Thanks to our partnerships, we’ve got pins, plushies, and books – and they’re on sale!

Do you subscribe to the NFB Education newsletter? If you do, you’ll be getting a special Boxing Day code to buy select items at a discounted price. If you don’t, it’s not too late! Head on over to our subscription page and sign up today!

If you see something you like, click on the image to buy. If you can wait for Boxing Day, then don’t forget to use your discount code!

Happy holidays!

Happy Worker Pins and Plushies

NFB Logo
Madame Tutli-Putli
The Cat Came Back – Cat in a Basket
The Cat Came Back
NFB 3-Pack
NFB Classic Logo
I Like Girls
The Cat Came Back – Angelic Cat
The Big Snit
Cat Came Back
The Log Driver’s Waltz

Firefly Books

Flawed by Andrea Dorfman

Andrea Dorfman’s beautiful short film was first transformed into an interactive project, and now it’s found a third incarnation in book form. A must-have for any girl who’s ever battled with their self-esteem.

George Hunter’s Canada
Threads by Torill Kove

Torill Kove’s latest animated short was one of the first NFB films to be turned into a book. It deals with the complex relationships that bind us together.

The Cat Came Back by Cordell Barker

Of course we’ve got a book version of this Cordell Barker classic – the darn cat just couldn’t stay away.

My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts by Torill Kove

Of the 5 books we’ve done with Firefly, two of them are based on Torill Kove’s films. This one deals with one woman and her tall tales about her service to her country during the war.

The post Give the Gift of the NFB This Holiday Season! appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/10/holiday-2018-sale/

Film

This Week on NFB.ca: Watch 4 Inspiring Films about Living with Disability

This week on NFB.ca we looked at films that explore disability, specifically focusing on the stories of four individuals and how they navigate through life.

From an accomplished playwright to a soulful singer to a group of women redefining intimacy, these films show different aspects of what it means to live with a disability, and thrive in the face of adversity.

We regret to inform you

Meet Dr. Heidi Janz, an incredible woman who’s accomplished far more in her life than many can ever hope to… despite having a severe disability. She’s written award-winning plays and holds a position as an adjunct professor but is unable to perform the simple tasks required to live life independently. Yet, she is denied any financial assistance from government programs because her mind is still productive. This 10-minute short raises interesting questions about what it means to live with a disability.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/we_regret_to_inform_you/

How Does it Feel?

This is a gem of a short film that focuses on disability and the restorative power of art. Fifty-eight-year-old Kazumi suffers from cerebral palsy, but that doesn’t stop him from partaking in his favourite pastime – singing. Aided by vocal teacher Fides Krucker, he puts together a one-man show like no other, with interpretations of Motown classics that will leave you breathless… and reaching for the Kleenex.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/how_does_it_feel/

Citizen Sam

This feature doc from 2006 presents the inspirational story of Sam Sullivan. Sullivan is a quadriplegic city councilor in Vancouver making a run for mayor. Politics is stressful enough, campaigning is pure hell, and then throw in the added disability? Suffice it to say that Sullivan is an incredible human being, and this is an honest portrait that does his story justice.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/citizen_sam/

Toward Intimacy

It’s hard to believe this film was produced over 25 years ago, but there you have it. In this feature doc, we follow 4 women who share their stories of disability with us. Though their stories touch on different topics, the biggest focus is on finding and sustaining intimacy. From sexuality to self-esteem, these women open up in order to allow us a better understanding of their issues.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/toward_intimacy/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca: Watch 4 Inspiring Films about Living with Disability appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/07/disability-films/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

This Week on NFB.ca: Watch 4 Inspiring Films about Living with Disability

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

This week on NFB.ca we looked at films that explore disability, specifically focusing on the stories of four individuals and how they navigate through life.

From an accomplished playwright to a soulful singer to a group of women redefining intimacy, these films show different aspects of what it means to live with a disability, and thrive in the face of adversity.

We regret to inform you

Meet Dr. Heidi Janz, an incredible woman who’s accomplished far more in her life than many can ever hope to… despite having a severe disability. She’s written award-winning plays and holds a position as an adjunct professor but is unable to perform the simple tasks required to live life independently. Yet, she is denied any financial assistance from government programs because her mind is still productive. This 10-minute short raises interesting questions about what it means to live with a disability.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/we_regret_to_inform_you/

How Does it Feel?

This is a gem of a short film that focuses on disability and the restorative power of art. Fifty-eight-year-old Kazumi suffers from cerebral palsy, but that doesn’t stop him from partaking in his favourite pastime – singing. Aided by vocal teacher Fides Krucker, he puts together a one-man show like no other, with interpretations of Motown classics that will leave you breathless… and reaching for the Kleenex.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/how_does_it_feel/

Citizen Sam

This feature doc from 2006 presents the inspirational story of Sam Sullivan. Sullivan is a quadriplegic city councilor in Vancouver making a run for mayor. Politics is stressful enough, campaigning is pure hell, and then throw in the added disability? Suffice it to say that Sullivan is an incredible human being, and this is an honest portrait that does his story justice.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/citizen_sam/

Toward Intimacy

It’s hard to believe this film was produced over 25 years ago, but there you have it. In this feature doc, we follow 4 women who share their stories of disability with us. Though their stories touch on different topics, the biggest focus is on finding and sustaining intimacy. From sexuality to self-esteem, these women open up in order to allow us a better understanding of their issues.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/toward_intimacy/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca: Watch 4 Inspiring Films about Living with Disability appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/07/disability-films/

Film

#MyNFB : Brought Together by the Beastly Blackfly

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

My father was born in Ontario, the province that doesn’t have traditional seasons like summer, fall and winter, but rather measures time by which blood-sucking insect is currently out to get you. Unfortunately, most of them overlap.

#MyNFB | Last summer, we issued a call for submissions. Many of you participated, sharing your affection for NFB films. Here is the piece written by Chantal Beaulne.

It was “Mosquito-Blackfly-Horsefly” season when we travelled to Ontario for my cousin’s wedding. Usually you gain weight on vacation, but my little brother and I found ourselves alleviated of a “pound of flesh”—in the Merchant of Venice sense of the term. Whenever we complained about the constant scratching and swelling, my father would sing “The Blackfly Song” to cheer us up.

Years later, while googling the song for my father, I discovered the pencil-crayon animated short Blackfly (1991). The suffering of the big-nosed and increasingly withered character brought tears of laughter (and empathy) to us all. The film opens with a POV shot of a fly buzzing erratically through a house, and that energy permeates the entire work. Accompanied throughout by the distinctly Ontarian twang of Wade Hemsworth’s singing, the simplistic art style

manages to be comedic even while the boiling line and colour work give a squirming impression. It’s fitting, as the story concerns a recent addition to the Abitibi survey crew pitted against ever-hungrier and ever-more ridiculously resourceful insects. He runs, hides, slaps the air, and dives underwater, all to no avail. (In the last instance, the flies merely don miniature scuba gear, in one of the film’s most memorable images.)

While the NFB specializes in making distinctly Canadian films, there are few pieces of media that capture the feeling and culture of North Ontario so effectively. The short certainly gets my father sharing stories of his own time in “the Bush” when he was a young mineral explorer.

The NFB has always had a place in my family, thanks to my father’s fondness for many of their shorts and television shows from his childhood and my mother’s reliance on the public library for our entertainment needs. I vividly remember him bringing The Rise and Fall of the Great Lakes (1968) to my third-grade class to teach some basic geology, as well as watching countless collections of animated shorts. All of these contributed to my personal interest in the NFB and pursuit of animation as a career.

Yet the film we return to as a family, over and over again, is Blackfly. They may be horrific proof of an uncaring god, but dangit, these bugs are a part of the Canadian experience, and so bring people together. Together in mutual hatred and suffering, perhaps, but that’s still an opinion most can agree on—and that’s something to be cherished.

Everyone sing along: “I’ll die with a blackfly picking my bones, in North Ontario-io, in North Ontario…”

Or… I could just go to Ontario during snow flea season, instead.

By Chantal Beaulne


Watch Blackfly :

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/blackfly/

The post #MyNFB : Brought Together by the Beastly Blackfly appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/05/mynfb-blackfly-chantal-beaulne/

Film

#MyNFB : Brought Together by the Beastly Blackfly

My father was born in Ontario, the province that doesn’t have traditional seasons like summer, fall and winter, but rather measures time by which blood-sucking insect is currently out to get you. Unfortunately, most of them overlap.

#MyNFB | Last summer, we issued a call for submissions. Many of you participated, sharing your affection for NFB films. Here is the piece written by Chantal Beaulne.

It was “Mosquito-Blackfly-Horsefly” season when we travelled to Ontario for my cousin’s wedding. Usually you gain weight on vacation, but my little brother and I found ourselves alleviated of a “pound of flesh”—in the Merchant of Venice sense of the term. Whenever we complained about the constant scratching and swelling, my father would sing “The Blackfly Song” to cheer us up.

Years later, while googling the song for my father, I discovered the pencil-crayon animated short Blackfly (1991). The suffering of the big-nosed and increasingly withered character brought tears of laughter (and empathy) to us all. The film opens with a POV shot of a fly buzzing erratically through a house, and that energy permeates the entire work. Accompanied throughout by the distinctly Ontarian twang of Wade Hemsworth’s singing, the simplistic art style

manages to be comedic even while the boiling line and colour work give a squirming impression. It’s fitting, as the story concerns a recent addition to the Abitibi survey crew pitted against ever-hungrier and ever-more ridiculously resourceful insects. He runs, hides, slaps the air, and dives underwater, all to no avail. (In the last instance, the flies merely don miniature scuba gear, in one of the film’s most memorable images.)

While the NFB specializes in making distinctly Canadian films, there are few pieces of media that capture the feeling and culture of North Ontario so effectively. The short certainly gets my father sharing stories of his own time in “the Bush” when he was a young mineral explorer.

The NFB has always had a place in my family, thanks to my father’s fondness for many of their shorts and television shows from his childhood and my mother’s reliance on the public library for our entertainment needs. I vividly remember him bringing The Rise and Fall of the Great Lakes (1968) to my third-grade class to teach some basic geology, as well as watching countless collections of animated shorts. All of these contributed to my personal interest in the NFB and pursuit of animation as a career.

Yet the film we return to as a family, over and over again, is Blackfly. They may be horrific proof of an uncaring god, but dangit, these bugs are a part of the Canadian experience, and so bring people together. Together in mutual hatred and suffering, perhaps, but that’s still an opinion most can agree on—and that’s something to be cherished.

Everyone sing along: “I’ll die with a blackfly picking my bones, in North Ontario-io, in North Ontario…”

Or… I could just go to Ontario during snow flea season, instead.

By Chantal Beaulne


Watch Blackfly :

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/blackfly/

The post #MyNFB : Brought Together by the Beastly Blackfly appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/05/mynfb-blackfly-chantal-beaulne/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

New on NFB Education – December 2018

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Did you know that NFB Education updates its films, playlists, and educational offers every week? With so much content constantly being added to our site, we know it can be hard to keep up—especially when you’re busy. With that in mind, we’ve created a handy guide that teachers can reference.

Check back every month for more documentaries, animation, and resource learning materials you can use in the classroom!

Here’s everything new on NFB Education this December!

EDUCATIONAL FILMS ON CAMPUS

24 Davids

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/24-davids_en/

Céline Baril’s takes us across three continents on a quest driven by a simple yet original idea: to shine a spotlight on the inimitable Davids of this world.

Four Million Threads

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/four_million_threads/

Welcome to Monira’s world, and that of countless other women in Bangladesh’s booming garment trade

Hedgehog’s Home

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

Based on the story by Branko Ćopić, this animated short tells the tale of a hedgehog living in a lush and lively forest.

Indian Time

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/indian-time/

INDIAN TIME is a personal and current portrayal of the 11 Aboriginal nations of Québec.

Living Here

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/living_here/

Living Here is a story made of solitude and wind, told with the poetry of Nunavik’s stark tundra and the beauty of young Martha’s words.

Those Who Come Will Hear

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/those-who-come-will-hear/

This film starts with the discovery of these unsung tongues through listening to the daily life of those who still speak them today.

EDUCATIONAL PLAYLISTS

I Can Make Art Like…

  • A playlist of films for students aged 5-12

Art For Kids

  • A playlist of films for students aged 12-17

Winter Sports Films

  • A playlist of films for students aged 9-17

Films For Kids About Winter

  • A playlist of films for students aged 5-12

Films About Disability

EDUCATIONAL DESCRIPTION UPDATES

  1. Angry Inuk
  2. The Apology
  3. Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner
  4. A Better Man
  5. Chris Hadfield 2016 Virtual Classroom
  6. China 2000 BC: The Rise and Fall of Dynasties in Ancient China
  7. China 2000 BC – Unearthing the Truth Behind a Myth: The Xia Dynasty
  8. Citizens’ Medicine
  9. The Colours of Pride
  10. A Dark Room
  11. Four Million Threads
  12. Freelancer on the Front Lines
  13. Hadwin’s Judgement
  14. Happiness Is Loving Your Teacher
  15. Limit Is the Sky
  16. Ninth Floor
  17. No Quick Fix
  18. The Point: Community Legal Clinic
  19. The Road Forward
  20. S.P.L.A.S.H.
  21. Shadow of a Giant
  22. The Skiff of Renald and Thomas
  23. Torchrunners
  24. Things Arab Men Say
  25. Women, Contemporary Aboriginal Issues, and Resistance
  26. Worth Every Minute

HOW TO REGISTER FOR A CAMPUS ACCOUNT

CAMPUS is our subscription-based VOD service that offers educators access to hundreds of exclusive educational films, lesson plans, study guides, film chaptering, and more. Your school may already be subscribed to CAMPUS. Use the links below to register your personal account and begin exploring all that CAMPUS has to offer!

Quebec

All Quebec English School Boards

All Quebec French School Boards

Saskatchewan

Network Services → Contact NetworkServices@gov.sk.ca

Ontario

Toronto District School Board

Peel District School Board

York Region District School Board → Contact NFB Customer Service at info@nfb.ca

If you cannot find your institution, please contact our customer service by email at info@nfb.ca or call 1-800-267-7710.

FOLLOW NFB EDUCATION

Subscribe to our Newsletter for bi-monthly educational films, mini-lessons, offers, and exclusive promotions.

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The post New on NFB Education – December 2018 appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2018/12/03/new-on-nfb-education-december-2018/