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Film

How to Film a War in 2019

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

What issues are raised by filming in conflict zones? Since its inception in 1939, the NFB has produced countless films on the subject of war, from its reports on the battlefields of Europe during World War II to documentaries about the front lines of the Vietnam War, famines in Africa, the Balkan genocides, and the struggle against ISIS. The common thread running through all these works:  How do you go about filming a war?

How close does death have to come to make a camera operator’s hand unsteady? These words open the educational short film Headline Hunters, produced by the NFB in 1945.

Narrated by Tommy Tweed and Lorne Greene (the star of the Bonanza and Battlestar Galactica series), this defence of war journalism and military PR was utterly in keeping with the existing mandate of the NFB, which had been created six years earlier.

Back then, the NFB supported the war effort with various forms of patriotic reporting—and in that historic year when the Axis powers in Rome, Berlin, and Tokyo surrendered, what better way to demonstrate the role (and, above all, the effectiveness and heroism) of the Fourth Estate in war zones?

Return to Vimy film

But let’s be honest. The “spectacle” of war owes much to the media. Military-industrial technology and audiovisual technology alike have undergone astonishing advances over the years, advances that have in turn vastly changed both how we “make” war and how we document, record, recreate, and even create it.

For instance, we can now enhance the human element in war through virtual reality. “VR allows us to react to our own story. But I would still never show actual war in VR, because it could cause some serious damage and trauma,” explains Karim Ben Khelifa, a war photographer (who has covered conflicts ever since he made his own way to the former Yugoslavia) and the creator of the immersive installation The Enemy.

The Enemy immersive experience

Today, in the era of algorithm-guided drones and so-called “clean wars,” conflict zones still overflow with film crews, reporters, and documentarians from around the world who make the battleground and its issues the focus of their work. Montreal filmmaker Julien Fréchette is one of them.

To film My War with cinematographer Arnaud Bouquet, he exposed himself to the risks of the battlefield, but he also made a less spectacular observation: war is mostly about the long, anxious periods of calm between the explosions, and the moments of introspection that ensue.

Camera, mic, and boom

In 2014, as armed ISIS groups were attacking Mosul in Iraq, Fréchette left for Iraqi Kurdistan. With funding from the Conseil des arts, SODEC, and RDI, he directed the documentary Kurdistan, by will or by force.

While this conflict was raging, he learned that in both Rojava (Syrian Kurdistan) and Iraq, Western fighters were joining “People’s Protection Units” (the YPG), the armed branch of Syria’s Democratic Union Party, which Turkey viewed as the Syrian Branch of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) that was fighting against ISIS, among others.

In fact, nearly 40 percent of their forces were made up of women, as shown in director Zaynê Akyol’s 2016 documentary, Gulîstan, Land of Roses.

Gulîstan, Land of Roses

In 2017, Fréchette—whose 2012 film, Silence Is Gold, documented the battle fought by author Alain Deneault and his publisher, Écosociété, against mining giants Barrick Gold and Banro after the book Noir Canada (2008) was published—decided to return to Kurdistan to cover the Western fighters joining the Kurdish resistance and anti-ISIS militias.

I had submitted two or three film ideas to the NFB, and then I decided to revisit the subject of foreign combatants. I also wanted to follow through on my own reflections after my return from Kurdistan. It was my first experience with human misery. I felt powerless. All that injustice did nothing but produce trauma. I wanted to see if “taking action” and “following through” could alleviate that sense of powerlessness.

Fréchette took to social networks to reconnect with a Western fighter he’d met in Kurdistan, and he met two others on Facebook: British Columbia native Hanna Böhman and “Wali,” a Quebecer and former sharpshooter with the Royal 22e Régiment.

Coming soon on NFB.ca : My War will be available online for free as of Feb. 28.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/my-war/

Fréchette then headed into the field, employing a process he describes in French as “cinéma d’accompagnement.” Armed only with a camera, a microphone, and a boom, without even a bulletproof vest, and accompanied by Bouquet (and occasionally Khaled Sulaiman, a Kurdish-Quebecer friend who acted as an interpreter), he explored the battleground on two occasions, for a total of four weeks.

During his first trip to Kurdistan in 2014, a sniper shot at him in the middle of the night when he went out to relieve himself. This time, Fréchette only got close to the action once, during the last day of filming.

Once it begins, war just becomes the normal state of affairs. It starts from the top down, and then hate fans the flames of hate. To be honest, I wasn’t tempted to make a career of it. There was bombing on the last day, but nobody panicked, so there was no ripple effect.

 Everyone has their own reason

Fréchette’s documentary opens with a funeral scene back home, immediately conveying that not only are the human losses very real, but they serve to both justify the action and condemn it.

We come to understand that Hanna is driven by a desire for vengeance that grows with each film she shoots at the front, which Fréchette then incorporates into his documentary. As he points out:

Most of my own filming took place in Iraq. Hanna’s videos provide insight into what’s going on in Syria. Turkey is breathing new life into the conflict through its war with the Kurds. When we were in Qamishli [in Syrian Kurdistan], we saw and heard Turks bombing the Kurdish city. But absolutely nowhere in the media did we hear that Turkey was waging an internal war against the Kurds. Hanna had become such a friend of the Kurds that she had also become an enemy of the Turks.

While “Wali” had had previous experience on the battlefield (he states in My War that “I’m not a soldier anymore, but I still feel like one”), Hanna Böhman was an unusual case: a 40-something female civilian who decides to join the militias in order to participate in the fight against ISIS. She explains that her family took her “choice” very badly, especially her daughter, who thought she’d gone crazy.

“Social misfits, pathological liars, and psychopaths”

When he arrived in Iraq, Fréchette met up with his friend and interpreter Khaled Sulaiman, who helped him contact the fighters. “During a scouting tour, we discovered another base with some Western fighters. That’s where we met Thierry [a fighter from France].”

ma_guerre_01
ma_guerre_03
ma_guerre_02

My War documentary

NFB

During a moment of calm in My War, Thierry confides that “ISIS is an excuse. You go [to fight] to fill a void, to find something at that moment in your life.” He then observes that this war has attracted all sorts of social misfits, pathological liars, and psychopaths.

But Féchette takes a more moderate view. “Everyone has their own reasons for going to war. For example, there was one group of former soldiers who just couldn’t let go.”

Throughout the film, one gets the impression that Fréchette is recording not so much the conflict but the paradoxes arising out of a complex situation—circumstances in which people feel they can do something useful, even if they sometimes have to go against their political convictions.

Some former US soldiers are overtly pro-Trump, but they go to Kurdistan and join organizations that have philosophies that are completely different from their own. Some of them end up fighting alongside extreme left-wing groups like the YPG.

Julien Fréchette (Photo : Frédérique Ménard-Aubin)

 

Fréchette is certain that Canadian authorities are well aware that former soldiers and civilians are going overseas. But once on the ground, many of these Western fighters are surprised—and sometimes frustrated—to learn that their desire for action doesn’t always line up with the wishes of the anti-ISIS militias. Fréchette feels that the Westerners aren’t really making a difference on the ground, and their participation often poses problems.

The producer’s role

At one point during the conversation, when Fréchette is asked how one of his producers reacted when he went off to film in a conflict zone, he responds that she simply told him to “be careful.”

Like Karim Ben Khelifa, who gathered accounts from the Middle East, the Congo, and El Salvador to create The Enemy, Fréchette had to do some advance outreach work with his producer and with journalistic sources and “fixers.”

NFB producer Colette Loumède is poised and eloquent on the phone. She’s the person who got My War made, but she also produced Gulîstan, Land of Roses, her first project to be filmed in a conflict zone.

For her, the appeal of working on and guiding Fréchette’s film didn’t have anything to do with the thought of ending up in a war zone. “That’s just the drama of the setting; the characters are the true subject,” she explains, stressing that she was pleased with Fréchette’s approach and angle.

After identifying the conflict zone as the “constraint,” Fréchette and Loumède took every precaution they could. “We based our approach on how journalists cover everything internationally. The way to avoid setbacks is to make sure you have reliable sources and good fixers.” She adds that she would never have agreed to work on a project by a filmmaker who wanted to “play the daredevil”:

We tried to avoid sensationalism and propaganda. The first expense in the budget was extra insurance. But the real insurance policy is to not put yourself in danger in the first place.

Loumède feels it’s important to understand that film crews are not alone in the field. Filming in a conflict zone doesn’t always involve crouching behind a wall and risking one’s life. She strongly believes that you can do good work and cover important stories without being suicidal.

And she’s quite adamant when she states, “The correlation between truth and danger is simply a myth.”

The post How to Film a War in 2019 appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/my-war-film-production/

Film

How to Film a War in 2019

What issues are raised by filming in conflict zones? Since its inception in 1939, the NFB has produced countless films on the subject of war, from its reports on the battlefields of Europe during World War II to documentaries about the front lines of the Vietnam War, famines in Africa, the Balkan genocides, and the struggle against ISIS. The common thread running through all these works:  How do you go about filming a war?

How close does death have to come to make a camera operator’s hand unsteady? These words open the educational short film Headline Hunters, produced by the NFB in 1945.

Narrated by Tommy Tweed and Lorne Greene (the star of the Bonanza and Battlestar Galactica series), this defence of war journalism and military PR was utterly in keeping with the existing mandate of the NFB, which had been created six years earlier.

Back then, the NFB supported the war effort with various forms of patriotic reporting—and in that historic year when the Axis powers in Rome, Berlin, and Tokyo surrendered, what better way to demonstrate the role (and, above all, the effectiveness and heroism) of the Fourth Estate in war zones?

Return to Vimy film

But let’s be honest. The “spectacle” of war owes much to the media. Military-industrial technology and audiovisual technology alike have undergone astonishing advances over the years, advances that have in turn vastly changed both how we “make” war and how we document, record, recreate, and even create it.

For instance, we can now enhance the human element in war through virtual reality. “VR allows us to react to our own story. But I would still never show actual war in VR, because it could cause some serious damage and trauma,” explains Karim Ben Khelifa, a war photographer (who has covered conflicts ever since he made his own way to the former Yugoslavia) and the creator of the immersive installation The Enemy.

The Enemy immersive experience

Today, in the era of algorithm-guided drones and so-called “clean wars,” conflict zones still overflow with film crews, reporters, and documentarians from around the world who make the battleground and its issues the focus of their work. Montreal filmmaker Julien Fréchette is one of them.

To film My War with cinematographer Arnaud Bouquet, he exposed himself to the risks of the battlefield, but he also made a less spectacular observation: war is mostly about the long, anxious periods of calm between the explosions, and the moments of introspection that ensue.

Camera, mic, and boom

In 2014, as armed ISIS groups were attacking Mosul in Iraq, Fréchette left for Iraqi Kurdistan. With funding from the Conseil des arts, SODEC, and RDI, he directed the documentary Kurdistan, by will or by force.

While this conflict was raging, he learned that in both Rojava (Syrian Kurdistan) and Iraq, Western fighters were joining “People’s Protection Units” (the YPG), the armed branch of Syria’s Democratic Union Party, which Turkey viewed as the Syrian Branch of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) that was fighting against ISIS, among others.

In fact, nearly 40 percent of their forces were made up of women, as shown in director Zaynê Akyol’s 2016 documentary, Gulîstan, Land of Roses.

Gulîstan, Land of Roses

In 2017, Fréchette—whose 2012 film, Silence Is Gold, documented the battle fought by author Alain Deneault and his publisher, Écosociété, against mining giants Barrick Gold and Banro after the book Noir Canada (2008) was published—decided to return to Kurdistan to cover the Western fighters joining the Kurdish resistance and anti-ISIS militias.

I had submitted two or three film ideas to the NFB, and then I decided to revisit the subject of foreign combatants. I also wanted to follow through on my own reflections after my return from Kurdistan. It was my first experience with human misery. I felt powerless. All that injustice did nothing but produce trauma. I wanted to see if “taking action” and “following through” could alleviate that sense of powerlessness.

Fréchette took to social networks to reconnect with a Western fighter he’d met in Kurdistan, and he met two others on Facebook: British Columbia native Hanna Böhman and “Wali,” a Quebecer and former sharpshooter with the Royal 22e Régiment.

Coming soon on NFB.ca : My War will be available online for free as of Feb. 28.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/my-war/

Fréchette then headed into the field, employing a process he describes in French as “cinéma d’accompagnement.” Armed only with a camera, a microphone, and a boom, without even a bulletproof vest, and accompanied by Bouquet (and occasionally Khaled Sulaiman, a Kurdish-Quebecer friend who acted as an interpreter), he explored the battleground on two occasions, for a total of four weeks.

During his first trip to Kurdistan in 2014, a sniper shot at him in the middle of the night when he went out to relieve himself. This time, Fréchette only got close to the action once, during the last day of filming.

Once it begins, war just becomes the normal state of affairs. It starts from the top down, and then hate fans the flames of hate. To be honest, I wasn’t tempted to make a career of it. There was bombing on the last day, but nobody panicked, so there was no ripple effect.

 Everyone has their own reason

Fréchette’s documentary opens with a funeral scene back home, immediately conveying that not only are the human losses very real, but they serve to both justify the action and condemn it.

We come to understand that Hanna is driven by a desire for vengeance that grows with each film she shoots at the front, which Fréchette then incorporates into his documentary. As he points out:

Most of my own filming took place in Iraq. Hanna’s videos provide insight into what’s going on in Syria. Turkey is breathing new life into the conflict through its war with the Kurds. When we were in Qamishli [in Syrian Kurdistan], we saw and heard Turks bombing the Kurdish city. But absolutely nowhere in the media did we hear that Turkey was waging an internal war against the Kurds. Hanna had become such a friend of the Kurds that she had also become an enemy of the Turks.

While “Wali” had had previous experience on the battlefield (he states in My War that “I’m not a soldier anymore, but I still feel like one”), Hanna Böhman was an unusual case: a 40-something female civilian who decides to join the militias in order to participate in the fight against ISIS. She explains that her family took her “choice” very badly, especially her daughter, who thought she’d gone crazy.

“Social misfits, pathological liars, and psychopaths”

When he arrived in Iraq, Fréchette met up with his friend and interpreter Khaled Sulaiman, who helped him contact the fighters. “During a scouting tour, we discovered another base with some Western fighters. That’s where we met Thierry [a fighter from France].”

ma_guerre_01
ma_guerre_03
ma_guerre_02

My War documentary

NFB

During a moment of calm in My War, Thierry confides that “ISIS is an excuse. You go [to fight] to fill a void, to find something at that moment in your life.” He then observes that this war has attracted all sorts of social misfits, pathological liars, and psychopaths.

But Féchette takes a more moderate view. “Everyone has their own reasons for going to war. For example, there was one group of former soldiers who just couldn’t let go.”

Throughout the film, one gets the impression that Fréchette is recording not so much the conflict but the paradoxes arising out of a complex situation—circumstances in which people feel they can do something useful, even if they sometimes have to go against their political convictions.

Some former US soldiers are overtly pro-Trump, but they go to Kurdistan and join organizations that have philosophies that are completely different from their own. Some of them end up fighting alongside extreme left-wing groups like the YPG.

Julien Fréchette (Photo : Frédérique Ménard-Aubin)

 

Fréchette is certain that Canadian authorities are well aware that former soldiers and civilians are going overseas. But once on the ground, many of these Western fighters are surprised—and sometimes frustrated—to learn that their desire for action doesn’t always line up with the wishes of the anti-ISIS militias. Fréchette feels that the Westerners aren’t really making a difference on the ground, and their participation often poses problems.

The producer’s role

At one point during the conversation, when Fréchette is asked how one of his producers reacted when he went off to film in a conflict zone, he responds that she simply told him to “be careful.”

Like Karim Ben Khelifa, who gathered accounts from the Middle East, the Congo, and El Salvador to create The Enemy, Fréchette had to do some advance outreach work with his producer and with journalistic sources and “fixers.”

NFB producer Colette Loumède is poised and eloquent on the phone. She’s the person who got My War made, but she also produced Gulîstan, Land of Roses, her first project to be filmed in a conflict zone.

For her, the appeal of working on and guiding Fréchette’s film didn’t have anything to do with the thought of ending up in a war zone. “That’s just the drama of the setting; the characters are the true subject,” she explains, stressing that she was pleased with Fréchette’s approach and angle.

After identifying the conflict zone as the “constraint,” Fréchette and Loumède took every precaution they could. “We based our approach on how journalists cover everything internationally. The way to avoid setbacks is to make sure you have reliable sources and good fixers.” She adds that she would never have agreed to work on a project by a filmmaker who wanted to “play the daredevil”:

We tried to avoid sensationalism and propaganda. The first expense in the budget was extra insurance. But the real insurance policy is to not put yourself in danger in the first place.

Loumède feels it’s important to understand that film crews are not alone in the field. Filming in a conflict zone doesn’t always involve crouching behind a wall and risking one’s life. She strongly believes that you can do good work and cover important stories without being suicidal.

And she’s quite adamant when she states, “The correlation between truth and danger is simply a myth.”

The post How to Film a War in 2019 appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/my-war-film-production/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Pause: In the animation studios with Eloi and Randall

This week on NFB PAUSE we spoke to two members of the animation department, Eloi Champagne and Randall Finnerty. Through their candid discussion and one-on-one interviews, we learn quite a bit about the inner workings of the NFB’s animation studio.

Animation at the NFB

The animation department is one of the cornerstones of the NFB. Almost since the Board’s inception, animation has played a huge role in its activities. From reels made for the war in the 40s to today’s experimental shorts, it has been a hotbed of creative activity for almost 80 years. Seven of the Board’s 12 Oscar wins belong to the department, not to mention dozens of nominees.

Yet none of this would be possible without the incredible staff members who work there. Dedicated, bold, experienced – they will do whatever needs to be done to get the project completed. The NFB boasts its auteur approach to animation, but it still takes a team to bring the vision to the screen.

Enter Eloi Champagne and Randall Finnerty, two men who bring years of experience, passion, and craft to their positions. The former serves as technical director at the Board while the latter is the technical specialist for animation.

Eloi Champagne, Technical Director

With a background in photography and typography, Eloi possesses many skills that transfer beautifully over to his position at the NFB. He is 100% on board with the Board’s mission to produce projects that cannot be undertaken in the private sector. He thrives on the innovative work he gets to do – in film, interactive, and VR.

Some of Eloi’s other credits include Mystery of the Secret Room, Little Big Bang, The Death of Kao-Kuk, and I Am Here, a short film about one man’s search for answers to life’s big questions.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/i_am_here/

Randall Finnerty, Technical Specialist

Randall is a 21-year veteran of the NFB. At this point, he’s got a toolkit like you’ve never seen, and is capable of working miracles. He’s also easygoing and generous with his time. You want him on your team. He’s got credits on over 100 films and has worked closely on 50% of those.

Some of Randall’s other credits include Me and My Moulton, Soup of the Day, Meltdown, and last year’s runaway hit, Hedgehog’s Home.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

About those Oscars…

Some of the animation films graced with an Oscar include The Danish Poet, Neighbours, and Bob’s Birthday, whose creators – Alison Snowden and David Fine – are up for another Academy Award this year with their latest film, Animal Behaviour. Lucky for you, it’s available online for free for a very limited time.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/animal_behaviour/

 

The post NFB Pause: In the animation studios with Eloi and Randall appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/animation-eloi-randall/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Pause: In the animation studios with Eloi and Randall

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

This week on NFB PAUSE we spoke to two members of the animation department, Eloi Champagne and Randall Finnerty. Through their candid discussion and one-on-one interviews, we learn quite a bit about the inner workings of the NFB’s animation studio.

Animation at the NFB

The animation department is one of the cornerstones of the NFB. Almost since the Board’s inception, animation has played a huge role in its activities. From reels made for the war in the 40s to today’s experimental shorts, it has been a hotbed of creative activity for almost 80 years. Seven of the Board’s 12 Oscar wins belong to the department, not to mention dozens of nominees.

Yet none of this would be possible without the incredible staff members who work there. Dedicated, bold, experienced – they will do whatever needs to be done to get the project completed. The NFB boasts its auteur approach to animation, but it still takes a team to bring the vision to the screen.

Enter Eloi Champagne and Randall Finnerty, two men who bring years of experience, passion, and craft to their positions. The former serves as technical director at the Board while the latter is the technical specialist for animation.

Eloi Champagne, Technical Director

With a background in photography and typography, Eloi possesses many skills that transfer beautifully over to his position at the NFB. He is 100% on board with the Board’s mission to produce projects that cannot be undertaken in the private sector. He thrives on the innovative work he gets to do – in film, interactive, and VR.

Some of Eloi’s other credits include Mystery of the Secret Room, Little Big Bang, The Death of Kao-Kuk, and I Am Here, a short film about one man’s search for answers to life’s big questions.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/i_am_here/

Randall Finnerty, Technical Specialist

Randall is a 21-year veteran of the NFB. At this point, he’s got a toolkit like you’ve never seen, and is capable of working miracles. He’s also easygoing and generous with his time. You want him on your team. He’s got credits on over 100 films and has worked closely on 50% of those.

Some of Randall’s other credits include Me and My Moulton, Soup of the Day, Meltdown, and last year’s runaway hit, Hedgehog’s Home.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hedgehogs_home/

About those Oscars…

Some of the animation films graced with an Oscar include The Danish Poet, Neighbours, and Bob’s Birthday, whose creators – Alison Snowden and David Fine – are up for another Academy Award this year with their latest film, Animal Behaviour. Lucky for you, it’s available online for free for a very limited time.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/animal_behaviour/

 

The post NFB Pause: In the animation studios with Eloi and Randall appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/animation-eloi-randall/

Film

Food for thought: Watch Four Free Films About Food!

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Food is one of our favourite things, as it is both delicious and necessary for survival. In this list, we’re serving up a four-course meal of culinary cinema. Every film on our menu offers a different perspective on food, but a passion for all things edible is evident in each one.

So, whether you’re a dedicated foodie or just looking for a light snack, why not pull up a chair, have a seat, and enjoy this foursome of films about food.

Bon appétit!

The Art of Eating

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/art_of_eating/

We begin our list with this short documentary that spotlights a wonderful night at the Club Prosper Montagne, one of the world’s leading gastronomic societies. This foodie fiesta is filled with delectable dishes and topped off with the viewer being introduced to Marcel Kretz, one of the most accomplished chefs in the country.

How Do They Make Potato Chips

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/how_do_they_make_potato_chips/

Answering what is perhaps one of the most befuddling questions to ever plague humankind, this short documentary tells us how, exactly, potato chips are made. Watch the process unfold before your very eyes, beginning with the humble potato, and learn how everyone’s favourite salty snack is prepared.

Pierogi Pinch 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pierogi_pinch/

Food is more than just delicious fuel—it can also be an important part of our cultural identity. Indeed, the dishes we make are often a reflection of our shared history. And, in this brilliantly animated short, we follow a young woman who, during the difficult process of making pierogis, is helped out by the memory of her grandmother in recreating a recipe that has been passed down through the generations.

Infusion

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/infusion_en/

Our last food-based flick is this documentary that takes viewers to the shores of Eastern Canada. Traditionally blended in New Brunswick for well over a century, King Cole tea is the quintessential Maritime beverage. Combining folk memory and contemporary perspectives, this documentary is a playful reminder of the cultural power of food.

The post Food for thought: Watch Four Free Films About Food! appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/free-films-about-food/

Film

NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Whether you’re staying inside during a rainy day, bundled up from a winter storm, or trying to beat the heat, let us blow you away with 4 entertaining and educational films all about the weather!

The Origins of Weather

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/origins_of_weather/

Let’s start with a crash course in all things atmospheric. Joseph Koenig’s classic short documentary is the perfect primer for this list. Clocking in at 12 minutes, this entertaining mini-doc will fill you in on all the basics. Combining live action and animation to great effect, the film explores the different forces that contribute to the stability of both climate and weather on our planet. Recommended viewing for anyone interested in the subject.

Cold Fronts

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/cold_fronts/

A beautifully shot collage, Cold Fronts is a tribute to the West Coast climate. In this documentary, director Murray Siple explores the love-hate relationship Vancouver denizens have with the cold, wet winter. Overall, this film offers a very personal perspective on how humans in urban environments adapt to the forces of nature that surround us.

Northern Lights

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/northern_lights/

Perhaps one of the most breathtaking and mysterious of all atmospheric phenomena, the aurora borealis (or northern lights) is a stunning reminder of the beauty of nature. In this documentary, we explore both the scientific and cultural significance of the lights. Combining Indigenous folklore, animation, live action, and scientific examination, the doc explores the physical reality and the wondrous nature of the lights.

A Cloud’s Dream

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hothouse_7_clouds_dream/

Made through the NFB Hothouse apprenticeship program, this animated short provides an excellent example of the ways in which science can influence art. Wonderfully rendered using partial audio waveform data, A Cloud’s Dream imaginatively simulates how various visually striking cloud formations are created.

The post NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/science-weather-climate-atmosphere-films/

Film

Food for thought: Watch Four Free Films About Food!

Food is one of our favourite things, as it is both delicious and necessary for survival. In this list, we’re serving up a four-course meal of culinary cinema. Every film on our menu offers a different perspective on food, but a passion for all things edible is evident in each one.

So, whether you’re a dedicated foodie or just looking for a light snack, why not pull up a chair, have a seat, and enjoy this foursome of films about food.

Bon appétit!

The Art of Eating

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/art_of_eating/

We begin our list with this short documentary that spotlights a wonderful night at the Club Prosper Montagne, one of the world’s leading gastronomic societies. This foodie fiesta is filled with delectable dishes and topped off with the viewer being introduced to Marcel Kretz, one of the most accomplished chefs in the country.

How Do They Make Potato Chips

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/how_do_they_make_potato_chips/

Answering what is perhaps one of the most befuddling questions to ever plague humankind, this short documentary tells us how, exactly, potato chips are made. Watch the process unfold before your very eyes, beginning with the humble potato, and learn how everyone’s favourite salty snack is prepared.

Pierogi Pinch 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pierogi_pinch/

Food is more than just delicious fuel—it can also be an important part of our cultural identity. Indeed, the dishes we make are often a reflection of our shared history. And, in this brilliantly animated short, we follow a young woman who, during the difficult process of making pierogis, is helped out by the memory of her grandmother in recreating a recipe that has been passed down through the generations.

Infusion

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/infusion_en/

Our last food-based flick is this documentary that takes viewers to the shores of Eastern Canada. Traditionally blended in New Brunswick for well over a century, King Cole tea is the quintessential Maritime beverage. Combining folk memory and contemporary perspectives, this documentary is a playful reminder of the cultural power of food.

The post Food for thought: Watch Four Free Films About Food! appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/free-films-about-food/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere

Whether you’re staying inside during a rainy day, bundled up from a winter storm, or trying to beat the heat, let us blow you away with 4 entertaining and educational films all about the weather!

The Origins of Weather

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/origins_of_weather/

Let’s start with a crash course in all things atmospheric. Joseph Koenig’s classic short documentary is the perfect primer for this list. Clocking in at 12 minutes, this entertaining mini-doc will fill you in on all the basics. Combining live action and animation to great effect, the film explores the different forces that contribute to the stability of both climate and weather on our planet. Recommended viewing for anyone interested in the subject.

Cold Fronts

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/cold_fronts/

A beautifully shot collage, Cold Fronts is a tribute to the West Coast climate. In this documentary, director Murray Siple explores the love-hate relationship Vancouver denizens have with the cold, wet winter. Overall, this film offers a very personal perspective on how humans in urban environments adapt to the forces of nature that surround us.

Northern Lights

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/northern_lights/

Perhaps one of the most breathtaking and mysterious of all atmospheric phenomena, the aurora borealis (or northern lights) is a stunning reminder of the beauty of nature. In this documentary, we explore both the scientific and cultural significance of the lights. Combining Indigenous folklore, animation, live action, and scientific examination, the doc explores the physical reality and the wondrous nature of the lights.

A Cloud’s Dream

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hothouse_7_clouds_dream/

Made through the NFB Hothouse apprenticeship program, this animated short provides an excellent example of the ways in which science can influence art. Wonderfully rendered using partial audio waveform data, A Cloud’s Dream imaginatively simulates how various visually striking cloud formations are created.

The post NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/science-weather-climate-atmosphere-films/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Whether you’re staying inside during a rainy day, bundled up from a winter storm, or trying to beat the heat, let us blow you away with 4 entertaining and educational films all about the weather!

The Origins of Weather

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/origins_of_weather/

Let’s start with a crash course in all things atmospheric. Joseph Koenig’s classic short documentary is the perfect primer for this list. Clocking in at 12 minutes, this entertaining mini-doc will fill you in on all the basics. Combining live action and animation to great effect, the film explores the different forces that contribute to the stability of both climate and weather on our planet. Recommended viewing for anyone interested in the subject.

Cold Fronts

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/cold_fronts/

A beautifully shot collage, Cold Fronts is a tribute to the West Coast climate. In this documentary, director Murray Siple explores the love-hate relationship Vancouver denizens have with the cold, wet winter. Overall, this film offers a very personal perspective on how humans in urban environments adapt to the forces of nature that surround us.

Northern Lights

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/northern_lights/

Perhaps one of the most breathtaking and mysterious of all atmospheric phenomena, the aurora borealis (or northern lights) is a stunning reminder of the beauty of nature. In this documentary, we explore both the scientific and cultural significance of the lights. Combining Indigenous folklore, animation, live action, and scientific examination, the doc explores the physical reality and the wondrous nature of the lights.

A Cloud’s Dream

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hothouse_7_clouds_dream/

Made through the NFB Hothouse apprenticeship program, this animated short provides an excellent example of the ways in which science can influence art. Wonderfully rendered using partial audio waveform data, A Cloud’s Dream imaginatively simulates how various visually striking cloud formations are created.

The post NFB Science: Weather, Climate and Atmosphere appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/19/science-weather-climate-atmosphere-films/

Film

This Week on NFB.ca – Love is in the Air

Love and relationships were all the rage this week as we celebrated Valentine’s Day. One day a year dedicated to romance, heartfelt proclamations of adoration, and bumping up the profit margins at your local florist. Here, we celebrate with film.

This week on NFB.ca we looked at films about love and relationships in all their various forms. From first love to the quest for love, these films capture all the feels the day calls for.

I Like Girls

Meet four women – Charlotte, Mathilde, Marie, and Diane – who tell us about their first loves with great candor and tenderness. From early crushes to mutual attraction, through the entire process of falling in love, these women reveal some of their most intimate moments with humour and grace.

The film is divided into four short vignettes and is animated in Obom’s signature style. What emerges from each piece is the joyfulness and sense of self that each narrator extracts from their personal experiences. It’s a film that celebrates not only same-sex love but love itself.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/i_like_girls/

Canada Vignettes: Log Driver’s Waltz

Arguably one of our most popular films, this short has made every Top 10 list we’ve ever put together. And why not? In this masterpiece, animator John Weldon presents the Canadian log driver in a whole new light – that of romantic hero.

When it comes time to choose a mate and settle down, who would you rather have? The businessman or banker who brings home the dough, or the hot, sweaty labourer with all the smooth dance moves? Our heroine falls in love with the latter, and we get to watch as the McGarrigle sisters sing them downstream.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/log_drivers_waltz/

Missed Connection

Who hasn’t indulged in some passing fantasy about a complete stranger? Someone you see through the window of a train headed in the opposite direction, or across the street right before the bus goes by and obstructs your view. In a moment, they’re gone. But what might have been?

That’s the question Tabitha Fisher tries to answer in 60 seconds in this animated short from the Hothouse series. I love her animation style and her sense of humour shines through as we watch one man create an entire future out of thin air.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hothouse_7_missed_connection/

The Pedlar

This is a perfect example of one of the NFB’s hidden gems. The Pedlar is a beautifully shot and well-acted fiction film based on a short story called A Place of One’s Own. It tells the tale a man who lives his life on the road but has reached the point where he wants to settle down and find love.

The film is an exploration of loneliness, the search for meaning, and unrequited love. It shows what happens when an outsider comes into a situation that has been mired in unhappiness, and how people affect each other’s lives. And did I mention the acting? The film is a winner, and if you haven’t seen it yet, this is the perfect occasion.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pedlar/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca – Love is in the Air appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/15/films-love-is-in-the-air/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

This Week on NFB.ca – Love is in the Air

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

Love and relationships were all the rage this week as we celebrated Valentine’s Day. One day a year dedicated to romance, heartfelt proclamations of adoration, and bumping up the profit margins at your local florist. Here, we celebrate with film.

This week on NFB.ca we looked at films about love and relationships in all their various forms. From first love to the quest for love, these films capture all the feels the day calls for.

I Like Girls

Meet four women – Charlotte, Mathilde, Marie, and Diane – who tell us about their first loves with great candor and tenderness. From early crushes to mutual attraction, through the entire process of falling in love, these women reveal some of their most intimate moments with humour and grace.

The film is divided into four short vignettes and is animated in Obom’s signature style. What emerges from each piece is the joyfulness and sense of self that each narrator extracts from their personal experiences. It’s a film that celebrates not only same-sex love but love itself.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/i_like_girls/

Canada Vignettes: Log Driver’s Waltz

Arguably one of our most popular films, this short has made every Top 10 list we’ve ever put together. And why not? In this masterpiece, animator John Weldon presents the Canadian log driver in a whole new light – that of romantic hero.

When it comes time to choose a mate and settle down, who would you rather have? The businessman or banker who brings home the dough, or the hot, sweaty labourer with all the smooth dance moves? Our heroine falls in love with the latter, and we get to watch as the McGarrigle sisters sing them downstream.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/log_drivers_waltz/

Missed Connection

Who hasn’t indulged in some passing fantasy about a complete stranger? Someone you see through the window of a train headed in the opposite direction, or across the street right before the bus goes by and obstructs your view. In a moment, they’re gone. But what might have been?

That’s the question Tabitha Fisher tries to answer in 60 seconds in this animated short from the Hothouse series. I love her animation style and her sense of humour shines through as we watch one man create an entire future out of thin air.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/hothouse_7_missed_connection/

The Pedlar

This is a perfect example of one of the NFB’s hidden gems. The Pedlar is a beautifully shot and well-acted fiction film based on a short story called A Place of One’s Own. It tells the tale a man who lives his life on the road but has reached the point where he wants to settle down and find love.

The film is an exploration of loneliness, the search for meaning, and unrequited love. It shows what happens when an outsider comes into a situation that has been mired in unhappiness, and how people affect each other’s lives. And did I mention the acting? The film is a winner, and if you haven’t seen it yet, this is the perfect occasion.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/pedlar/

 

The post This Week on NFB.ca – Love is in the Air appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/15/films-love-is-in-the-air/

Film

Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has declared 2019 the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019) —“in order to raise awareness of them, not only to benefit the people that speak these languages, but also for others to appreciate the important contribution they make to our world’s rich cultural diversity” (UNESCO IYIL2019 website).

In Canada alone, approximately 230,000 Indigenous people currently speak one or more of the 60 dialects within the 12 linguistic families; most of these languages have been listed by UNESCO as either vulnerable or endangered, some critically—including several dialects of Inuktitut, which became the official language of the Northwest Territories, Labrador, and the territories now known as Nunavut in 1984. Not only does language play an important role in identity, knowledge, and culture, in Indigenous cultures the mother tongue also preserves and passes on these traditions.

In 2015, the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission explained to Canadians and the world that Indigenous languages had been threatened by the genocidal actions of the residential school system. The TRC also created “94 Calls to Action” to address the loss of languages.

The National Film Board of Canada has heard and responded to the “calls to action.” We are committed to playing our part in the preservation and revitalization of Indigenous languages through the creation and re-release of Indigenous-language versions of films in our Indigenous collection, which speak eloquently of the essential relationship between Indigenous peoples and their languages. The films in our playlist are offered in several Indigenous languages: Inuktitut, Nakota (Assiniboine), Mohawk, Cree, and Atikamekw. Watch with us, listen and learn with us, and you will hear some of the most beautiful languages in the world.

Join us in celebrating Indigenous languages with this rich playlist of NFB films!

Kanehsatake 270 Years of Resistance (Mohawk Version)

In July 1990, a dispute over a proposed golf course to be built on Kanien’kéhaka (Mohawk) lands in Oka, Quebec, set the stage for a historic confrontation that would grab international headlines and sear itself into the Canadian consciousness. Director Alanis Obomsawin—at times with a small crew, at times alone—spent 78 days behind Kanien’kéhaka lines filming the armed standoff between protestors, the Quebec police and the Canadian army.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/kanehsatake_270_years_of_resistance_mohawk/

Atisokan nte Manawanik nistam kenokok

An account of how settler civilization has invaded Indigenous peoples’ lives, governed their hunting, trapping, and fishing, confined them to reserves, and made it difficult to pursue traditional ways of life. César Néwashish recounts how his grandfather Louis Néwashish founded Manawan.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_nistam_kenokok/

Atisokan nte Manawanik minowach kenokok

A continuation of History of Manowan: Part 1. Discusses the death of Indian customs, independence and dignity, with the advent of the white society.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_minowach_kenokok/

Qimmit: A Clash of Two Truths (Inuktitut Version)

This feature documentary offers an overview of the changes experienced by the Inuit from 1950-1970 with their loss of sled dogs and semi-nomadic lifestyle. A controversial issue at the time, many Inuit still believe that their dogs were deliberately killed by the RCMP as part of government policy to force them off the land and into “civilization.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/qimmit_a_clash_of_two_truths_iu/

Katawapiskak Sipiwi Ininiwak

The people of the Attawapiskat First Nation, a Cree community in northern Ontario, were thrust into the national spotlight in 2012 when the impoverished living conditions on their reserve became an issue of national debate.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/katawapiskak_sipiwi_ininiwak_cr/

Nowhere Land (Inuktitut Version)

This short documentary is a quiet elegy for the ancestral Inuit way of life, which exists now only in the memories of those who experienced it. Bonnie Ammaaq and her family remember it vividly.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/nowhere_land_inuktitut/

Breaths (Inuktitut Version)

In this evocative short, Inuit singer-songwriter and humanitarian Susan Aglukark weaves together stories of artistry, family, and belonging as she explores the complex cultural shifts of the last 50 years of Inuit life.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/breaths_iu/

Three Thousand (Inuktitut Version)

In this short film, Inuk artist Asinnajaq plunges us into a sublime imaginary universe—14 minutes of luminescent, archive-inspired cinema that recast the present, past and future of her people in a radiant new light.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/three_thousand_inuktitut_version/

To Wake Up the Nakota Language (Nakota Version)

“When you don’t know your language or your culture, you don’t know who you are,” says 69-year-old Armand McArthur, one of the last fluent Nakota speakers in Pheasant Rump First Nation, Treaty 4 territory, in southern Saskatchewan. Through the wisdom of his words, Armand is committed to revitalizing his language and culture for his community and future generations.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/to_wake_up_the_nakota_language_asb/

The post Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/14/indigenous-languages/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has declared 2019 the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019) —“in order to raise awareness of them, not only to benefit the people that speak these languages, but also for others to appreciate the important contribution they make to our world’s rich cultural diversity” (UNESCO IYIL2019 website).

In Canada alone, approximately 230,000 Indigenous people currently speak one or more of the 60 dialects within the 12 linguistic families; most of these languages have been listed by UNESCO as either vulnerable or endangered, some critically—including several dialects of Inuktitut, which became the official language of the Northwest Territories, Labrador, and the territories now known as Nunavut in 1984. Not only does language play an important role in identity, knowledge, and culture, in Indigenous cultures the mother tongue also preserves and passes on these traditions.

In 2015, the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission explained to Canadians and the world that Indigenous languages had been threatened by the genocidal actions of the residential school system. The TRC also created “94 Calls to Action” to address the loss of languages.

The National Film Board of Canada has heard and responded to the “calls to action.” We are committed to playing our part in the preservation and revitalization of Indigenous languages through the creation and re-release of Indigenous-language versions of films in our Indigenous collection, which speak eloquently of the essential relationship between Indigenous peoples and their languages. The films in our playlist are offered in several Indigenous languages: Inuktitut, Nakota (Assiniboine), Mohawk, Cree, and Atikamekw. Watch with us, listen and learn with us, and you will hear some of the most beautiful languages in the world.

Join us in celebrating Indigenous languages with this rich playlist of NFB films!

Kanehsatake 270 Years of Resistance (Mohawk Version)

In July 1990, a dispute over a proposed golf course to be built on Kanien’kéhaka (Mohawk) lands in Oka, Quebec, set the stage for a historic confrontation that would grab international headlines and sear itself into the Canadian consciousness. Director Alanis Obomsawin—at times with a small crew, at times alone—spent 78 days behind Kanien’kéhaka lines filming the armed standoff between protestors, the Quebec police and the Canadian army.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/kanehsatake_270_years_of_resistance_mohawk/

Atisokan nte Manawanik nistam kenokok

An account of how settler civilization has invaded Indigenous peoples’ lives, governed their hunting, trapping, and fishing, confined them to reserves, and made it difficult to pursue traditional ways of life. César Néwashish recounts how his grandfather Louis Néwashish founded Manawan.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_nistam_kenokok/

Atisokan nte Manawanik minowach kenokok

A continuation of History of Manowan: Part 1. Discusses the death of Indian customs, independence and dignity, with the advent of the white society.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_minowach_kenokok/

Qimmit: A Clash of Two Truths (Inuktitut Version)

This feature documentary offers an overview of the changes experienced by the Inuit from 1950-1970 with their loss of sled dogs and semi-nomadic lifestyle. A controversial issue at the time, many Inuit still believe that their dogs were deliberately killed by the RCMP as part of government policy to force them off the land and into “civilization.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/qimmit_a_clash_of_two_truths_iu/

Katawapiskak Sipiwi Ininiwak

The people of the Attawapiskat First Nation, a Cree community in northern Ontario, were thrust into the national spotlight in 2012 when the impoverished living conditions on their reserve became an issue of national debate.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/katawapiskak_sipiwi_ininiwak_cr/

Nowhere Land (Inuktitut Version)

This short documentary is a quiet elegy for the ancestral Inuit way of life, which exists now only in the memories of those who experienced it. Bonnie Ammaaq and her family remember it vividly.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/nowhere_land_inuktitut/

Breaths (Inuktitut Version)

In this evocative short, Inuit singer-songwriter and humanitarian Susan Aglukark weaves together stories of artistry, family, and belonging as she explores the complex cultural shifts of the last 50 years of Inuit life.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/breaths_iu/

Three Thousand (Inuktitut Version)

In this short film, Inuk artist Asinnajaq plunges us into a sublime imaginary universe—14 minutes of luminescent, archive-inspired cinema that recast the present, past and future of her people in a radiant new light.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/three_thousand_inuktitut_version/

To Wake Up the Nakota Language (Nakota Version)

“When you don’t know your language or your culture, you don’t know who you are,” says 69-year-old Armand McArthur, one of the last fluent Nakota speakers in Pheasant Rump First Nation, Treaty 4 territory, in southern Saskatchewan. Through the wisdom of his words, Armand is committed to revitalizing his language and culture for his community and future generations.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/to_wake_up_the_nakota_language_asb/

The post Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/14/indigenous-languages/

Film

Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has declared 2019 the International Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019) —“in order to raise awareness of them, not only to benefit the people that speak these languages, but also for others to appreciate the important contribution they make to our world’s rich cultural diversity” (UNESCO IYIL2019 website).

In Canada alone, approximately 230,000 Indigenous people currently speak one or more of the 60 dialects within the 12 linguistic families; most of these languages have been listed by UNESCO as either vulnerable or endangered, some critically—including several dialects of Inuktitut, which became the official language of the Northwest Territories, Labrador, and the territories now known as Nunavut in 1984. Not only does language play an important role in identity, knowledge, and culture, in Indigenous cultures the mother tongue also preserves and passes on these traditions.

In 2015, the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission explained to Canadians and the world that Indigenous languages had been threatened by the genocidal actions of the residential school system. The TRC also created “94 Calls to Action” to address the loss of languages.

The National Film Board of Canada has heard and responded to the “calls to action.” We are committed to playing our part in the preservation and revitalization of Indigenous languages through the creation and re-release of Indigenous-language versions of films in our Indigenous collection, which speak eloquently of the essential relationship between Indigenous peoples and their languages. The films in our playlist are offered in several Indigenous languages: Inuktitut, Nakota (Assiniboine), Mohawk, Cree, and Atikamekw. Watch with us, listen and learn with us, and you will hear some of the most beautiful languages in the world.

Join us in celebrating Indigenous languages with this rich playlist of NFB films!

Kanehsatake 270 Years of Resistance (Mohawk Version)

In July 1990, a dispute over a proposed golf course to be built on Kanien’kéhaka (Mohawk) lands in Oka, Quebec, set the stage for a historic confrontation that would grab international headlines and sear itself into the Canadian consciousness. Director Alanis Obomsawin—at times with a small crew, at times alone—spent 78 days behind Kanien’kéhaka lines filming the armed standoff between protestors, the Quebec police and the Canadian army.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/kanehsatake_270_years_of_resistance_mohawk/

Atisokan nte Manawanik nistam kenokok

An account of how settler civilization has invaded Indigenous peoples’ lives, governed their hunting, trapping, and fishing, confined them to reserves, and made it difficult to pursue traditional ways of life. César Néwashish recounts how his grandfather Louis Néwashish founded Manawan.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_nistam_kenokok/

Atisokan nte Manawanik minowach kenokok

A continuation of History of Manowan: Part 1. Discusses the death of Indian customs, independence and dignity, with the advent of the white society.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/atisokan_nte_manawanik_minowach_kenokok/

Qimmit: A Clash of Two Truths (Inuktitut Version)

This feature documentary offers an overview of the changes experienced by the Inuit from 1950-1970 with their loss of sled dogs and semi-nomadic lifestyle. A controversial issue at the time, many Inuit still believe that their dogs were deliberately killed by the RCMP as part of government policy to force them off the land and into “civilization.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/qimmit_a_clash_of_two_truths_iu/

Katawapiskak Sipiwi Ininiwak

The people of the Attawapiskat First Nation, a Cree community in northern Ontario, were thrust into the national spotlight in 2012 when the impoverished living conditions on their reserve became an issue of national debate.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/katawapiskak_sipiwi_ininiwak_cr/

Nowhere Land (Inuktitut Version)

This short documentary is a quiet elegy for the ancestral Inuit way of life, which exists now only in the memories of those who experienced it. Bonnie Ammaaq and her family remember it vividly.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/nowhere_land_inuktitut/

Breaths (Inuktitut Version)

In this evocative short, Inuit singer-songwriter and humanitarian Susan Aglukark weaves together stories of artistry, family, and belonging as she explores the complex cultural shifts of the last 50 years of Inuit life.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/breaths_iu/

Three Thousand (Inuktitut Version)

In this short film, Inuk artist Asinnajaq plunges us into a sublime imaginary universe—14 minutes of luminescent, archive-inspired cinema that recast the present, past and future of her people in a radiant new light.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/three_thousand_inuktitut_version/

To Wake Up the Nakota Language (Nakota Version)

“When you don’t know your language or your culture, you don’t know who you are,” says 69-year-old Armand McArthur, one of the last fluent Nakota speakers in Pheasant Rump First Nation, Treaty 4 territory, in southern Saskatchewan. Through the wisdom of his words, Armand is committed to revitalizing his language and culture for his community and future generations.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/to_wake_up_the_nakota_language_asb/

The post Celebrate the International Year of Indigenous Languages appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/14/indigenous-languages/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

CAMPUS 101: How to Create Chapters

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/campus_trailer/

Are you a CAMPUS subscriber but haven’t tried all the tools available to you? Are you an educator thinking about a CAMPUS subscription and wondering how you’d benefit? Whichever category you fall into, we’ve put together this handy little guide to show you everything CAMPUS has to offer. Specifically, we’ll be looking at how to create chapters using our titles.

What can CAMPUS do for me?

YouTube is filled with content and the NFB already has a substantial free offering, so why bother with a CAMPUS account? CAMPUS offers 6 distinct resources that will bolster your lesson plans and engage your students in active learning. They are:

  • Customizable playlists You can create your own selection of films, grouped together by whatever theme you choose. You’re able to write your own descriptions for the films, giving them all the context required for your classroom objectives.
  • Chapters Our chaptering tool allows you to create excerpts from the films we have online. This is useful when you only need one or two scenes. All chapters can be given individual descriptions and added to playlists.
  • Shareable content All of the playlists and chapters that you create using CAMPUS can be shared with your students, so that they can be accessed anywhere, at any time.
  • Interactive productions In addition to our vast library of films, you’ll also have access to our complete suite of interactive projects, which allow for more hands-on learning.
  • Pedagogical descriptions All of the films in our CAMPUS collection come with a brief description and prompts for classroom use, along with target subject areas and age levels. We have a team of educators who evaluate our content and provide information on how to get the most of out of the material.
  • Learning bundles Exactly as they sound, our learning bundles contain a rich selection of resources alongside our films to round out a lesson plan. These resources include background information, discussion questions, classroom activities, articles, clips, and other tools provided by us or our partners. No more need to scour the Internet – we’ve already done it for you!

Using the CAMPUS chaptering tool

Our chaptering tool allows you to create excerpts of any of the NFB films available online. It’s simple to use and makes it easy to store and organize clips for the classroom. No need to search or cue up to a certain spot – now you’ll have exactly what you need, right at your fingertips.

If you want to assemble a playlist of chapters (clips) from different film, or even from the same film, all you need to do is press the Create Chapters link below the video player of the film you’re watching.

The film will open in chaptering mode.

When you see the clip you want, click Create a Chapter. Beginning and end markers will appear under the player. Slide them along the timeline to create your chapter.

You can also include information about the chapter, such as a description, or add discussion questions and links to external resources. All you do is click Save when you’re done.

All your completed chapters will be listed on the right side of the player.

You can also view the My Chapters page, which will contain all the chapters you’ve created. From this page, you can also create playlists, or add chapters to existing playlists.

For more information on creating chapters, watch our video tutorial.

Questions? Comments?

If you have any questions or comments about any of our CAMPUS features, please feel free to leave a comment below.

 

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Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/11/campus-chapters/
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Film

CAMPUS 101: How to Create Chapters

Check out the National Film Board of Canada for more like this!

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/campus_trailer/

Are you a CAMPUS subscriber but haven’t tried all the tools available to you? Are you an educator thinking about a CAMPUS subscription and wondering how you’d benefit? Whichever category you fall into, we’ve put together this handy little guide to show you everything CAMPUS has to offer. Specifically, we’ll be looking at how to create chapters using our titles.

What can CAMPUS do for me?

YouTube is filled with content and the NFB already has a substantial free offering, so why bother with a CAMPUS account? CAMPUS offers 6 distinct resources that will bolster your lesson plans and engage your students in active learning. They are:

  • Customizable playlists You can create your own selection of films, grouped together by whatever theme you choose. You’re able to write your own descriptions for the films, giving them all the context required for your classroom objectives.
  • Chapters Our chaptering tool allows you to create excerpts from the films we have online. This is useful when you only need one or two scenes. All chapters can be given individual descriptions and added to playlists.
  • Shareable content All of the playlists and chapters that you create using CAMPUS can be shared with your students, so that they can be accessed anywhere, at any time.
  • Interactive productions In addition to our vast library of films, you’ll also have access to our complete suite of interactive projects, which allow for more hands-on learning.
  • Pedagogical descriptions All of the films in our CAMPUS collection come with a brief description and prompts for classroom use, along with target subject areas and age levels. We have a team of educators who evaluate our content and provide information on how to get the most of out of the material.
  • Learning bundles Exactly as they sound, our learning bundles contain a rich selection of resources alongside our films to round out a lesson plan. These resources include background information, discussion questions, classroom activities, articles, clips, and other tools provided by us or our partners. No more need to scour the Internet – we’ve already done it for you!

Using the CAMPUS chaptering tool

Our chaptering tool allows you to create excerpts of any of the NFB films available online. It’s simple to use and makes it easy to store and organize clips for the classroom. No need to search or cue up to a certain spot – now you’ll have exactly what you need, right at your fingertips.

If you want to assemble a playlist of chapters (clips) from different film, or even from the same film, all you need to do is press the Create Chapters link below the video player of the film you’re watching.

The film will open in chaptering mode.

When you see the clip you want, click Create a Chapter. Beginning and end markers will appear under the player. Slide them along the timeline to create your chapter.

You can also include information about the chapter, such as a description, or add discussion questions and links to external resources. All you do is click Save when you’re done.

All your completed chapters will be listed on the right side of the player.

You can also view the My Chapters page, which will contain all the chapters you’ve created. From this page, you can also create playlists, or add chapters to existing playlists.

For more information on creating chapters, watch our video tutorial.

Questions? Comments?

If you have any questions or comments about any of our CAMPUS features, please feel free to leave a comment below.

 

Discover more Mini-Lessons | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on Pinterest

The post CAMPUS 101: How to Create Chapters appeared first on NFB Blog.

from NFB Blog https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/02/11/campus-chapters/