Skip to content

Tag: movies

Film

Coming in May: Watch 3 New Animated Shorts on NFB.ca

Get a sneak peek at 3 brand new films from Alexandra Lemay, Chintis Lundgren, and Patrick Bouchard!

The month of May has finally brought
spring, along with a fresh crop of animated shorts. We’re thrilled to be
putting these three films online this month, and we hope you enjoy them.

FREAKS OF NURTURE

Disclaimer: I might be a little biased on this one, as it was co-written by yours truly. But I can put that aside to tell you that this film is a fun romp through the dysfunctional dynamics of a mother-daughter relationship. And it features some awesome pop culture references. Seriously. Watch it a few times and pay attention to the detail that Alex Lemay put into her film – the sets, the puppets… it’s a visual feast.

The story itself is as old as time –
daughter grows up and leaves the nest, yet still craves the love and approval
of a parent, specifically her mother. But Lemay’s film has an added twist, in
that she was raised by a single mom who also took in several foster children
and breeds dogs. The film is funny and touching and a joy to watch.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/freaks-of-nurture/

THE SUBJECT

This
story-within-a-story tackles the art of creation and marks, in my mind, Patrick
Bouchard’s most mature work to date. The premise is simple enough – the artist,
Patrick Bouchard, performs an autopsy on his art, also Patrick Bouchard. We’re
talking self-exploration on many levels here: art, one’s self, and the very
nature of animation itself. It’s enough to make your head implode if you think
about it for too long.

The film is about
Bouchard confronting his alter ego in the form of a life-size cast of his own
body. He digs into the corpse, revealing intricate mechanisms and versions of
himself, searching for something he’s anxious to find… and cast off.  It truly is a masterful work and represents a
great example of Bouchard’s journey as a filmmaker.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/subject/

MANIVALD | MAY 27

This film is
everything. It is impossible to watch this film and not smile, or even laugh
out loud, as I did on several occasions. The official synopsis says the film is
“tinged with typically absurdist Estonian humour” and I’ll have to take their
word for it, but all I can say is this film is FUN. And that’s not the first
adjective that comes to mind when you think about the story of a dysfunctional,
co-dependent relationship between a mother and son.

Manivald, however, is no typical son. He’s almost 33, unemployed, but
extremely over-educated. He still lives with his overbearing mother who dotes
over him and obsesses over his every move. They’re stuck in a routine, but everything
gets shaken up when Manivald’s mom calls the washing machine repairman in.
Toomas turns out to be a wolf in wolf’s clothing and throws Manivald’s world
into chaos when he opens a series of new doors in his world – some of which
he’d have preferred remained shut.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/manivald/

The post Coming in May: Watch 3 New Animated Shorts on NFB.ca appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/21/coming-in-may-3-new-animated-shorts/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Streamers: from the idea to a web series

Streamers are among the most active communities on the Internet. More than two million users post content every day (essentially video games played in real time) and reach some 100 million people who connect to the platform—the most popular of its kind in the world—every month. Between Fortnite, League of Legends and Grand Theft Auto, that added up more than 9 billion hours of video streamed in 2018. Today, Twitch is the fourth biggest user of bandwidth on the planet and generates a healthy revenue for those with the most followers.

On a deeper and more fundamental level, this phenomenon has ushered in a new kind of social bond, a new way of connecting with others and a new sense of togetherness.

So, how do you document what is emerging from this ever-growing niche community? How do you bear witness to the phenomenon and present it from an author’s point of view? How do you create a web series not on the Twitch community but with it? And, if possible, in real time and connected, just like the streaming platform itself?

That’s the challenge accepted by Guillaume Braun, founder and artistic director of Akufen, the digital creative studio behind projects like Journal d’une insomnie collective, Fort McMoney and Do Not Track. He put his professional ventures more or less on hold for two years to devote himself to streamers. What follows is the story of an incredible adventure and a personal challenge. An x-ray of a web series in the making.


Immersion

When he presented his project to the NFB, Guillaume Braun met with producers on… the Akufen Twitch channel. This wasn’t a caprice on his part. The author had immersed himself in the platform for several years to get an inside look at a world he had known (he is himself a gamer) but never quite mastered. “I wanted to do a short doc on notions related to exploration, contact with insiders, user influence and the interactive experience,” he wrote in 2017. “I wanted to explore the milieu to examine the scope of the phenomenon and get to know the key players. Who are streamers? Why do they do what they do? Who are the viewers? What attracts them to this platform? I wanted to make a very human film, and tell the story of streamers, each of whom are unique in their own right.”

For its part, the NFB has long been interested in phenomena that fly under the traditional media radar. They support projects that give visibility to those that society often overlooks and who may shed light on our collective future. “Streamers has enabled us to explore a new documentary form in the uncharted territory generated by our hyper-connected era of live access,” explains Louis-Richard Tremblay. “The streaming phenomenon has given rise to a new language and new cultural practices. How do you capture this? First, you immerse yourself fully in the world to understand what makes it unique and how it evolves. And then you leverage the great documentary tradition with the technological tools of today.”

How is streaming changing our relationship
with the world? According to Marianne Lévy-Leblond, that’s also what motivates
the teams at ARTE France. “We’ve been
involved in the Streamers project since the beginning. It has given us the
chance to meet communities whose rising importance is not well understood. In
fact, that’s become a central concern of our public service missions, in that
it provides a window into communities that often fall victim to false
stereotypes. Gaming and streaming have become mass consumer activities. They
feed popular culture and upset old hierarchies of knowledge and the patterns
that define social relationships. We also believe that an “open” documentary
that leverages the tools of the community that it’s observing (both for
research and broadcasting purposes) is both relevant and original.”

“We’ve been involved in the Streamers project since the beginning. It has given us the chance to meet communities whose rising importance is not well understood.” – Marianne Lévy-Leblond, ARTE France

Participant observation

The creator’s initial hypothesis:
Twitch is a primary manifestation of a foundation that foreshadows a new way of
living (together) online. The first difficulty: as with any social platform, it
comes with its own language, codes and uses that can be disconcerting to the
uninitiated. Understanding and adopting them is key.

Learning the rules of the game takes
time. Like a filmmaker in unknown lands—a bit like Jean Rouch—Guillaume Braun
decides to embrace what ethnologists call a “participant observation” approach.
He seeks to understand the Other by sharing in communal experiences, adopting
the vocabulary, and breaking with old habits by literally cutting himself off
from the world.

That means living on the platform
and becoming the subject in order to understand
the world from within rather than describe from the outside. Interviewing
someone isn’t the same as putting yourself in their shoes. Guillaume Braun
wanted to gain an intimate understanding of what drives streamers. “We decided to do a documentary that
would be designed, watched and accepted by the subjects,” he says. Which was also a clever
way to establish trust, gain credibility and create authentic connections with
his future characters. An ambitious project, as one can quickly fall out of
favour in the Twitch world. You have to proceed with caution or risk
jeopardizing your likeability—and your membership into the community.

“We decided to do a documentary that would be designed, watched and accepted by the subjects.” – Guillaume Braun

Avatar

Diving headlong into the experience,
Guillaume Braun becomes Will. Under cover of this avatar, he sets out to become
part of the fold. He roams around the platform, fascinated by a world of
superstar streamers with millions of followers and streamers with no followers
at all. He takes part in chats, comments and does live streams of his own, and
watches hours upon hours of video every day until he earns the trust of a
renowned streamer who lets him moderate his account.

Beyond a simple avatar or an
“improved version of himself”, he creates a whole world with its own tone and
aesthetic as well as a unique way of engaging with others on the streets and
back alleys of Twitch. This practical approach mirrors his intellectual one of
avoiding sensationalism to better understand “the most misunderstood pop culture of the modern
era.”

The undertaking requires
self-sacrifice and humility. You can’t stream part time if you want to reach
audiences, and Will began in an empty chat room. His avatar could have
leveraged communities that were already well established (like Akufen’s, for
instance) but he refused, opting to put himself in the shoes of a true novice.

Until he became one of them.

Duo

Twitch is both a communal and a
solitary experience. It’s personal and personalized. It revolves around the
self and is also deeply social. Will didn’t have all of the resources at hand
to stand out in such a niche society, so he formed a team to help him carry out
his project. The NFB producers recommended joining forces with Marie-Ève
Tremblay, a CBC radio host known for her show, Corde sensible.

An expert in community management
and live video production (where you film and interact with viewers at the same
time), she is accustomed to coming face-to-face with worlds that she doesn’t
understand. And, as someone whose interest in video games and streamers is
minimal, she brings a critical distance to the whole endeavour.

She is deemed to be the ideal
candidate to assist Guillaume in his investigation. The pair will come to form
a bond when they attend the first TwitchCon in history.

Discussion

Their investigation will lead the
directing duo to San Francisco in 2015 and San Diego in 2016 to attend the
Twitch world equivalent of high mass. This is their chance to be in physical
contact with streamers and viewers alike. The gap that separates the virtual
channels from the real world is so profound that being on site is a crucial way
to makes ties with the future protagonists of the project.

This is their chance to be in physical contact with streamers and viewers alike. The gap that separates the virtual channels from the real world is so profound that being on site is a crucial way to makes ties with the future protagonists of the project.

The documentary practice comes alive
when they’re immersed in the reality of TwitchCon and witness the scope of the
phenomenon firsthand. They see how popular and revered the streamers are… and
how difficult they are to pin down for a meeting.

They want to find quality streamers
who live the day-to-day reality on the platform and avoid sensationalism at all
costs. Marie-Ève gets creative and invites MANvsGAME, MrMoon and Summt1g to
attend a “salon” where she and Guillaume get to know the players who will
become indispensable to the project, like djWHEAT, the Twitch studio director
who organizes this large-scale event and who has been streaming since the era
of Justin.tv in 2005. 

In both San Francisco and San Diego,
the directing duo is welcomed with open arms. Everyone accepts their
invitations and they make solid connections. They don’t start filming yet, but
the structure of the project takes shape based on their discussions with the
key stakeholders. What makes their pitch so persuasive is that, as Twitch
ethnologists, they aren’t interested in adopting a scientific approach where
they dissect the secrets of these “strange” Twitch creatures with a magnifying
glass. They treat everyone as their equals. And Guillaume introduces himself as
Will—his avatar.

Everyone hits it off.

Interactivity

Back on the platform, Guillaume Braun and the Akufen team develop several tools to deepen their knowledge of streamers. They design technical devices to get the conversation going—all of which gives Will the chance to build the trust and appreciation of the community.

First, a mini robot chats with
streamers via five interactive questionnaires, generating almost 200 hours of
material. “What was the
first Nintendo product?”, “On average, how much time do you spend on Twitch
every week?”, “In what year was the first edition of Final Fantasy launched?” The brilliance of the device (which
categorizes participants based on their answers) is that it combines questions
based on their knowledge of video games with more personal inquiries. These
thousands of interactions—both trivial and serious— enrich the team’s knowledge
of the platform, keep the conversation going, and attract visitors, albeit a
modest number.

The questionnaire was designed to
create a surprise factor and keep up a conversational pace, but it lacked the
human element and interactivity that is at the heart of Twitch. If Guillaume
Braun had shown his face, he would no doubt have attracted more viewers, but
that didn’t figure into his game plan.

If Guillaume Braun had shown his face, he would no doubt have attracted more viewers, but that didn’t figure into his game plan.

It’s worth noting that their method
for reaching out to the key stakeholders of the project was directly inspired
by Journal d’une
insomnie collective
, an interactive
documentary that Akufen took part in, where insomniacs were asked questions
every night, and their responses helped finetune the project (similar to the
work of Katerina Cizek with her film Highrise). The
submitted answers were sprinkled throughout the experience, informed the
documentary process and anchored the final form of the project.

Which may indicate that there’s a
connection between streaming and insomnia… 😉

Live

For this project, Guillaume Braun and Akufen also developed a technology allowing them to create “research episodes” on Twitch, which brought together several streamers to discuss the habits and customs of the platform users. They leveraged this multi-user video stream system to host live interviews on the Twitch channel many times. In total, twenty-some people took part in the debates on themes defined in advance. These “performances” were also broadcast on social media to get maximum reach.

For the first time, Will spoke on
behalf of the project and led the discussions. Some of the people who appeared
in the final web series are featured here discussing their relationship with
the platform, how it differs from YouTube, the best ways to gain exposure, what
it means to be a woman on Twitch, and other ways that streaming can impact
their personal lives.

This phase was a decisive one. By
creating tools that encouraged streamers to take ownership of the project, and
by using their answers to inform how the project took shape, Guillaume Braun
stuck to his basic principle: that Twitch users who work on the platform every
day are in the best position to tell their own stories.

At this stage, the directing duo
collected precious information, including secrets to success and pitfalls to
avoid to keep the community on your side. They met the men and woman behind the
streamers and discovered their strengths and weaknesses. These discussions with
their future characters will have a big impact on their editorial approach. The
project’s central themes and questions will emerge directly from the debates
that were broadcast in real time as part of this collective experience. The
event highlights, still available on YouTube, give an interesting peek into
their documentary process.

Production

Twitch was used to design the web
series, so why not produce and broadcast it there too? To that end, Guillaume
Braun designed an application programming interface (API), which enabled him to
use Twitch just like Skype. This meant that all of the interviews could be done
with and by streamers on
their own terrain.

One of the platform’s
characteristics is how it gives users the feeling that they’re in the same room
with the person that they’re watching. This sensation of intimacy and physical
proximity is echoed in how the interviews are filmed and reproduced. “We need to let streamers use the
tools that they’re most familiar with if we want to get a true portrait of
these public personalities that gravitate around the vast and majestic virtual
world.”

“We need to let streamers use the tools that they’re most familiar with if we want to get a true portrait of these public personalities that gravitate around the vast and majestic virtual world.” – Guillaume Braun

The only cameras used for the
interviews and the whole web series are those of the streamers. They are in
control of the framework of their self-expression. This enables everyone to
maintain their signature style to a varying degree and preserves the
confidentiality of their home recording. No professional cameras, no production
crews, no intimidating aspects to the recording process, which uses the platform’s
own codes and language to its advantage. The participants forget about the
camera and feel like they’re on in a phone call rather than a film shoot.
Everything happens in the here and now with the authenticity of a live stream.

In the end, fourteen streamers (of
the 36 interviewed) are cast for the web series. Their words provide the raw
material for the project and their interviews provide the linear arc for the
series.

From and interactive approach to linear storytelling

Streamers became a web series for lack of a sufficiently
convincing interactive approach. The team considered creating an interactive
site where people could connect to Twitch in real time, but technical and
behavioural considerations prevented that from happening. If you send a user to
an identified streamer that doesn’t happen to be broadcasting at the time, the
experience is sure to be a disappointing one.

As with Journal d’une insomnie collective, only the preparation and
conceptual phases of Streamers were collaborative. The interactive
approach taken at the outset had an impact on the end result, but the end
result was not itself interactive. At first sight, at least. As we’ll see,
broadcasting four 12-minute webisodes may end up being the most interactive
project that Guillaume Braun has even done.

But another challenge awaits. It’s
easy to change codes with an interactive project where the production process
is malleable and iterative, but in a linear process, you have to make decisions
and choices that will have a lasting impact on the final form. In other words,
you can’t go with a trial-and-error research approach right up to the end. You
need to put validation stages in place. And once a decision is approved, you
can’t go back on it.

The script

The story of Will’s adventures in
the world of Twitch would no doubt have been as interesting to document as
letting streamers tell their own stories. But Guillaume Braun didn’t want to
put himself in the spotlight. And even if there was talk of he and Marie-Ève
Tremblay telling the story, the directors preferred to use their experiences
and expertise to fade into the background and give the protagonists full reign.

This desire for discretion doesn’t mean that Will is absent from the series. He does the voiceover that guides us through each episode. And though his avatar isn’t displayed on screen, Will’s aesthetic choices are all over the film: the motion design is part of his character and competes to give shape to the singular world of Streamers.

In the editing suite, the team opts
for simplicity. Aside from the motion design and voiceover elements, the series
consists of the interviews, a few archived streams and some visual cues
(emotes, emojis and other visual references to the Twitch world) that spice up
the four webisodes. It’s all about creating a little breathing room and opting
for a structure that breaks up what could otherwise be an overly didactic
sequence of interviews.

The narrative structure was designed
to lead viewers not to a goal, but to a more profound exploration of the
platform with every minute that passes. The chapters in place at the outset
evolve and, at the end, four remain: “Build your community”, “Speak the lingo”,
“Grind it out” and “Find your balance”. 
The four episodes discuss community engagement, the language and codes
of Twitch, the monetisation of streaming and how to find balance between your
online and offline life.

Deciding how to parse out the themes
and issues was a key concern: how do you build a progression that doesn’t
dissuade veteran and novice streamers alike from coming along for the ride? How
do you hook both the general public and an extremely niche audience in the
opening minutes of the first episode? It’s a challenging endeavour, especially
when you opt for a fragmented format where you can’t control the viewing order
of each episode.

How do you build a progression that doesn’t dissuade veteran and novice streamers alike from coming along for the ride? How do you hook both the general public and an extremely niche audience in the opening minutes of the first episode?

Finally, the edit was crafted to
make it look like all of the discussions took place on live Twitch channel
screens, with all of the inherent “real time” tension (and without making the
Will character overly fictionalized). The music and soundtrack composed by
Louis-Philippe Quesnel provided the finishing touch.

The “fifteenth character” of the web
series, the score was designed to merge with the Twitch world. The audio track,
present throughout, is not just a backdrop. It informs the world that we’re
entering into little by little. There are no percussive elements. Only
synthesizers that give a retro-modern effect and create an evocative soundscape
as we immerse ourselves into the platform.

The last stretch

So, how do you broadcast episodes
like these to get the most reach? This question—a vital one—also played a role
in how Streamers was structured. Guillaume Braun had
already noted in his early ideation documents: “How we broadcast the story and the ecosystem will
inform how the story is told.”

As with any digital project, the
goal is to reach the largest audience possible. Because of this, the authors
steered clear of other interactive forms (VR included) which are harder to
promote to the general public. That’s also why they didn’t go with a dedicated
site and instead concentrated on platforms and social media. It was all about
effectiveness of the impact vs. formal exuberance.

It made sense to consider broadcasting
on Twitch itself. After all, of the 14 protagonists featured in the series,
GoldGlove has 1.38 million followers, CohhCarnage has 1.06 million, and
MANvsGAME has over 500,000. Will also ends up using Twitch to promote Streamers, by way of a Q&A on the GCPodcast that
broadcasts the series.

And that’s how the web series
became… interactive. As Guillaume himself states, the team had gone back and
forth on doing an interactive format from the start. In the end, Twitch became
the Streamers screening room, and the
post-viewing debates were instructive and lively.

In the end, Twitch became the Streamers screening room, and the post-viewing debates were instructive and lively.

The interactivity that had been a
consideration throughout became more of a state of mind for the project. In the
end, rather than a click or a like, it was the community response and the
reactions triggered that gave the series its interactive bent.

Other social media platforms were
also enlisted to broadcast the web series. YouTube and Facebook were hard to
avoid: their high traffic had to be taken into consideration, even though the
attention span of users there is sometimes quite low (only a few seconds
according to the most pessimistic studies).

The co-producers, NFB and ARTE, also
broadcast the series on their websites, and the rollout of the program made all
four episodes available everywhere at all times (much like how streamers
themselves are active on Twitch, but also on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube,
etc.).

Initially, the team intended to roll
out the series in specific formats (i.e., vertical formats for Snapchat), but
that ambition fell by the wayside in the interest of clarity. That said, the
team stuck with their decision to make all episodes available at once so that users
can view them in any order and not be disappointed if they come upon one by
chance.

With its fragmented form and
connected broadcast, Streamers relied on a significant asset: its
shareability. That’s one of the advantages (always up for discussion, of
course) of a web series vs. other more complex interactive forms: how quickly
and easily people can recommend it to others. Guillaume Braun recognizes that,
claiming that hundreds of people talked to him directly about Streamers online, whereas very few professionals
spontaneously shared their experience of the film with him. Usually, it’s the
other way around.

Stream spirit, are you there?

In its form, content and tone, Streamers looks a lot like a stream, which was no easy
feat. Beyond that, the web series is a reflection on the hyper-connected modern
world. It poses an interesting question: in the end, are video games just a
pretext to get together and talk? Gaming as a shared passion where people
inspire each other to build separate online identities (that are
indistinguishable from their offline ones)… Twitch may, in fact, serve as both
a mini society and a schoolyard where experimentation of all kinds is
encouraged: a niche phenomenon that has become a mass movement.

The stories that emerge on this
platform aren’t really about the streamers themselves, but about the
relationships that they have with their viewers. The same is true of this web
series: even if they don’t talk directly to one another, the interactions
between Will and the streamers are peppered throughout, and the conversation
between the series itself and the viewing public is what makes it a success.

But back to the initial challenge:
documenting a niche society that is connected 24/7. Here, the creative process
took place in real time, but the production and broadcasting forms couldn’t
follow suit. That proved disappointing for its creators, but, even so, Streamers gives us a lot to think about when it comes to
the future of digital filmmaking. It may have even paved the way to a form of
interactive television in its simplest and most spontaneous form.

Streamers gives us a lot to think about when it comes to the future of digital filmmaking. It may have even paved the way to a form of interactive television in its simplest and most spontaneous form.

Streamers demonstrates that streaming has become
mainstream, which lead Guillaume Braun to quote Andy Warhol’s famously
prophetic words from 1968: “In the future,
everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.” And then, laughing, he adds, “per day!”

It’s hard to tell if he’s joking or
not.

If you wish to watch or rewatch Streamers, click here.


Written by Cédric Mal in collaboration with the Interactive studio of the National Film Board of Canada

The post Streamers: from the idea to a web series appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/15/streamers-web-series/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Don’t Let the Angels Fall: The Curse of Cannes

Imagine producing a feature film and getting an invitation to enter it in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Pretty great, right? Youre on your way to a box office hit, right? Well, in the case of the NFB’s Don’t Let the Angels Fall, the first Canadian feature drama to ever compete at this festival, things didnt quite work out that way 

First, a little background. The film was written by novelist Timothy Findley, based on a story by director George Kaczender, and shot in Montreal in the summer of 1968 with Canadian actor Arthur Hill (The Andromeda StrainHarper) in the lead role. Sharon Acker, Charmion King and John Kastner (who went on to direct documentaries) were cast in important roles, as were Quebec actors Monique Mercure and Michèle Magny. 

The story is about a middle-aged man who, after having an extra-marital affair, finds he can no longer relate to his wife and childrenor to the rest of the world, for that matter. The family breaks down, and each member has a crisis. This is very much a film of its era. The 1960s saw many films about people feeling alienated and searching for meaning in a predominantly materialistic society. 

Don’t Let the Angels Fall poster

NFB staff were ecstatic when Don’t Let the Angels Fall was invited to compete at the Cannes Film Festival. The premiere at Cannes took place on May 12, 1969, to a warm reception. (The actors, who attended the screening, had been terrified that the film would not be received well. The night before, an Italian film had been greeted with boos and catcalls!) 

Kastner, who played the oldest son, Michael, was also covering the premiere for a Toronto newspaper. He wrote that when director Kaczender and the cast walked onto the red carpet on the way to the screening, they were embarrassed to hear onlookers ask, “Qui sont ils?” (Who are they?)!!  

Kastner’s embarrassment continued when he saw himself on the big screen doing his one nude love sceneMy lips were as big as the Titanic, he stated. He was very happy that his parents were not in the theatre to witness this. The audience warmly applauded the film, but the critics didnt like it. The reviews that came out the following day were mixed at best. Variety gave it a good review, but the majority of publications called the film pretentious. 

Canadian critics picked up on the negative reviews and relayed the news back home. Even with the bad reviews, Columbia Pictures agreed to distribute the film in Canada in the fall, but this caused some unexpected problems.

The NFB’s Distribution department did not want to enter it in the annual Canadian Film Awards, which were to be held a few days before itscheduled release in Toronto and Montreal. They felt that if the film didnwin any major awards (influenced by the bad reviews), it would kill its box office potential. Others at the NFB thought this was ludicrous, but in the end, it was decided not to submit the film to the CFAs, to give it a better chance to succeed. 

Don’t Let the Angels Fall was released in Toronto on October 24 (in one theatre) and in Montreal on the 29th (in two theatres). The result: it bombed in Toronto and played two weeks in Montreal (thanks largely to a very good review in the Montreal Star). A film with so much promise was out of theatres in just two weeks. Columbia did release it in several other Canadian cities over the next few months, but it did not fare much better. 

So, what happened? Is Don’t Let the Angels Fall that bad? Actually, no. As I wrote earlier, its a film of its era. It does have a downbeat feel to it, but the acting is solid throughout. The middle of the film drags a bit, but overall it makes for interesting viewing. I think the reason critics had such a mixed response to it is that this is a small art-house film.

It was shot in black and white and doesnt have any big-name stars in it, so, very little box office potential. Today, this type of film would quickly make its way to a streaming service where it would be categorized as an arthouse or indie production and enjoyed by people who seek out these types of films.  

Sometimes, premiering a film at a prestigious festival is not the best strategy. This was the case for Don’t Let the Angels Fall. It probably would have gone over better at a smaller festival without the big media spotlight.  

I invite you to discover this small but unique Canadian feature. It remains a valiant effort, and as such I applaud it. Enjoy. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/dont_let_the_angels_fall/

(A huge thank you to John Kastner for his insights and recollections)

The post Don’t Let the Angels Fall: The Curse of Cannes appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/14/dont-let-the-angels-fall-the-curse-of-cannes/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Don’t Let the Angels Fall: The Curse of Cannes

Imagine producing a feature film and getting an invitation to enter it in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Pretty great, right? Youre on your way to a box office hit, right? Well, in the case of the NFB’s Don’t Let the Angels Fall, the first Canadian feature drama to ever compete at this festival, things didnt quite work out that way 

First, a little background. The film was written by novelist Timothy Findley, based on a story by director George Kaczender, and shot in Montreal in the summer of 1968 with Canadian actor Arthur Hill (The Andromeda StrainHarper) in the lead role. Sharon Acker, Charmion King and John Kastner (who went on to direct documentaries) were cast in important roles, as were Quebec actors Monique Mercure and Michèle Magny. 

The story is about a middle-aged man who, after having an extra-marital affair, finds he can no longer relate to his wife and childrenor to the rest of the world, for that matter. The family breaks down, and each member has a crisis. This is very much a film of its era. The 1960s saw many films about people feeling alienated and searching for meaning in a predominantly materialistic society. 

Don’t Let the Angels Fall poster

NFB staff were ecstatic when Don’t Let the Angels Fall was invited to compete at the Cannes Film Festival. The premiere at Cannes took place on May 12, 1969, to a warm reception. (The actors, who attended the screening, had been terrified that the film would not be received well. The night before, an Italian film had been greeted with boos and catcalls!) 

Kastner, who played the oldest son, Michael, was also covering the premiere for a Toronto newspaper. He wrote that when director Kaczender and the cast walked onto the red carpet on the way to the screening, they were embarrassed to hear onlookers ask, “Qui sont ils?” (Who are they?)!!  

Kastner’s embarrassment continued when he saw himself on the big screen doing his one nude love sceneMy lips were as big as the Titanic, he stated. He was very happy that his parents were not in the theatre to witness this. The audience warmly applauded the film, but the critics didnt like it. The reviews that came out the following day were mixed at best. Variety gave it a good review, but the majority of publications called the film pretentious. 

Canadian critics picked up on the negative reviews and relayed the news back home. Even with the bad reviews, Columbia Pictures agreed to distribute the film in Canada in the fall, but this caused some unexpected problems.

The NFB’s Distribution department did not want to enter it in the annual Canadian Film Awards, which were to be held a few days before itscheduled release in Toronto and Montreal. They felt that if the film didnwin any major awards (influenced by the bad reviews), it would kill its box office potential. Others at the NFB thought this was ludicrous, but in the end, it was decided not to submit the film to the CFAs, to give it a better chance to succeed. 

Don’t Let the Angels Fall was released in Toronto on October 24 (in one theatre) and in Montreal on the 29th (in two theatres). The result: it bombed in Toronto and played two weeks in Montreal (thanks largely to a very good review in the Montreal Star). A film with so much promise was out of theatres in just two weeks. Columbia did release it in several other Canadian cities over the next few months, but it did not fare much better. 

So, what happened? Is Don’t Let the Angels Fall that bad? Actually, no. As I wrote earlier, its a film of its era. It does have a downbeat feel to it, but the acting is solid throughout. The middle of the film drags a bit, but overall it makes for interesting viewing. I think the reason critics had such a mixed response to it is that this is a small art-house film.

It was shot in black and white and doesnt have any big-name stars in it, so, very little box office potential. Today, this type of film would quickly make its way to a streaming service where it would be categorized as an arthouse or indie production and enjoyed by people who seek out these types of films.  

Sometimes, premiering a film at a prestigious festival is not the best strategy. This was the case for Don’t Let the Angels Fall. It probably would have gone over better at a smaller festival without the big media spotlight.  

I invite you to discover this small but unique Canadian feature. It remains a valiant effort, and as such I applaud it. Enjoy. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/dont_let_the_angels_fall/

(A huge thank you to John Kastner for his insights and recollections)

The post Don’t Let the Angels Fall: The Curse of Cannes appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/14/dont-let-the-angels-fall-the-curse-of-cannes/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Mini-Lesson for In the Shadow of Gold Mountain

In the Shadow of Gold Mountain – The Power of an Apology

In the film In the Shadow of Gold Mountain, filmmaker Karen Cho travels from Montreal to Vancouver to document stories from the last survivors of the Chinese Head Tax and Exclusion Act, a set of discriminatory laws imposed to single out the Chinese as unwanted immigrants to Canada from 1885 to 1947.

Themes:

  • Civics/Citizenship – Human Rights
  • History and Civil Rights Education – Civil Rights and Freedoms
  • Social Studies – Social Policies and Programs

Ages: 15–18

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/in_the_shadow_of_gold_mountain/

Guiding Question: Why was it important for Parliament to apologize and to make amends for past discriminatory laws against the Chinese?

1) Activity #1

Provide reasons that motivated the Canadian government of the day to impose the Head Tax on Chinese migrants and then subsequently pass the Exclusion Act.

Justify your answer.

Go Deeper

While the Chinese were a source of cheap labour that helped complete the Canadian Pacific Railway, they were also perceived as an economic threat to white Canada. In attempting to preserve the homogeneous nature of the country, assumptions were made that the Chinese could not integrate or assimilate because they were too different and too unwilling. Despite escalating measures to stem the flow of Chinese migrants, migration only stopped between 1923 and 1947 as a result of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

2) Activity #2

How did the policy of exclusion disrupt the lives of Chinese in Canada? Choose your top three answers and explain the impact of each.

  1. Family estrangement or separation
  2. Delay in starting own family
  3. Racism
  4. Segregation
  5. Financial hardship
  6. Statelessness
  7. Disenfranchisement
  8. Gender imbalance of men to women in Chinese communities

Go Deeper

Approximately two-thirds of the Chinese community was composed of bachelors who had left behind families in China. These bachelor societies existed for decades, since no Chinese were allowed into Canada. As a result of societal and systemic racism, Chinatown became a sanctuary for Chinese migrants. Without the support of extended family, fraternal societies provided support and camaraderie. During WWII, China fell under Japanese occupation; overseas Chinese found themselves helpless to save their families from the occupation’s impact. The Chinese who enlisted in WWII as part of Canada’s war effort did so for patriotic and strategic reasons. These war veterans, however, would not have voting rights until 1947, two years after their return from military service.

3) Activity #3

How important is it for government to recognize the wrongs committed against a victimized group and to offer an official apology and reparations?

  1. Very Important
  2. Important
  3. Moderately Important
  4. Slightly Important
  5. Not Important

Justify your answer.

Go Deeper

In 1984, NDP MP Margaret Mitchell received a letter from an elderly man who had paid the Head Tax. Local Vancouver radio broadcaster Hanson Lau interviewed Mitchell on his show and invited other Head Tax survivors to register their claims at his station. There were 200,000 people who registered over several weeks. The $23 million that the Canadian government had collected decades earlier was estimated to be worth $1 billion when adjusted for inflation over the years. The campaign for redress, however, did not receive unanimous support from other survivors; some asserted that the Head Tax was the price that they had willingly paid in order to start a new life. Others pushed for more than an apology: They wanted restitution for suffering and for being singled out as undesirable because of their race.

Postscript

In 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper delivered a formal government apology to the Chinese and Chinese Canadians whose lives were affected by these discriminatory laws and policies. He promised $20,000 in compensation to Head Tax payers or to spouses who had paid this tax, and a legacy program, the Community Historical Recognition Program (CHRP), was established to educate Canadians about this period of history. On April 22, 2018, Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson issued an official apology for historic racism against the Chinese, acknowledging discriminatory legislation and policies.

 

Discover more Mini-Lessons | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on Pinterest

The post Mini-Lesson for In the Shadow of Gold Mountain appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/13/mini-lesson-in-the-shadow-of-gold-mountain/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Mini-Lesson for In the Shadow of Gold Mountain

In the Shadow of Gold Mountain – The Power of an Apology

In the film In the Shadow of Gold Mountain, filmmaker Karen Cho travels from Montreal to Vancouver to document stories from the last survivors of the Chinese Head Tax and Exclusion Act, a set of discriminatory laws imposed to single out the Chinese as unwanted immigrants to Canada from 1885 to 1947.

Themes:

  • Civics/Citizenship – Human Rights
  • History and Civil Rights Education – Civil Rights and Freedoms
  • Social Studies – Social Policies and Programs

Ages: 15–18

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/in_the_shadow_of_gold_mountain/

Guiding Question: Why was it important for Parliament to apologize and to make amends for past discriminatory laws against the Chinese?

1) Activity #1

Provide reasons that motivated the Canadian government of the day to impose the Head Tax on Chinese migrants and then subsequently pass the Exclusion Act.

Justify your answer.

Go Deeper

While the Chinese were a source of cheap labour that helped complete the Canadian Pacific Railway, they were also perceived as an economic threat to white Canada. In attempting to preserve the homogeneous nature of the country, assumptions were made that the Chinese could not integrate or assimilate because they were too different and too unwilling. Despite escalating measures to stem the flow of Chinese migrants, migration only stopped between 1923 and 1947 as a result of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

2) Activity #2

How did the policy of exclusion disrupt the lives of Chinese in Canada? Choose your top three answers and explain the impact of each.

  1. Family estrangement or separation
  2. Delay in starting own family
  3. Racism
  4. Segregation
  5. Financial hardship
  6. Statelessness
  7. Disenfranchisement
  8. Gender imbalance of men to women in Chinese communities

Go Deeper

Approximately two-thirds of the Chinese community was composed of bachelors who had left behind families in China. These bachelor societies existed for decades, since no Chinese were allowed into Canada. As a result of societal and systemic racism, Chinatown became a sanctuary for Chinese migrants. Without the support of extended family, fraternal societies provided support and camaraderie. During WWII, China fell under Japanese occupation; overseas Chinese found themselves helpless to save their families from the occupation’s impact. The Chinese who enlisted in WWII as part of Canada’s war effort did so for patriotic and strategic reasons. These war veterans, however, would not have voting rights until 1947, two years after their return from military service.

3) Activity #3

How important is it for government to recognize the wrongs committed against a victimized group and to offer an official apology and reparations?

  1. Very Important
  2. Important
  3. Moderately Important
  4. Slightly Important
  5. Not Important

Justify your answer.

Go Deeper

In 1984, NDP MP Margaret Mitchell received a letter from an elderly man who had paid the Head Tax. Local Vancouver radio broadcaster Hanson Lau interviewed Mitchell on his show and invited other Head Tax survivors to register their claims at his station. There were 200,000 people who registered over several weeks. The $23 million that the Canadian government had collected decades earlier was estimated to be worth $1 billion when adjusted for inflation over the years. The campaign for redress, however, did not receive unanimous support from other survivors; some asserted that the Head Tax was the price that they had willingly paid in order to start a new life. Others pushed for more than an apology: They wanted restitution for suffering and for being singled out as undesirable because of their race.

Postscript

In 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper delivered a formal government apology to the Chinese and Chinese Canadians whose lives were affected by these discriminatory laws and policies. He promised $20,000 in compensation to Head Tax payers or to spouses who had paid this tax, and a legacy program, the Community Historical Recognition Program (CHRP), was established to educate Canadians about this period of history. On April 22, 2018, Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson issued an official apology for historic racism against the Chinese, acknowledging discriminatory legislation and policies.

 

Discover more Mini-Lessons | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on Pinterest

The post Mini-Lesson for In the Shadow of Gold Mountain appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/13/mini-lesson-in-the-shadow-of-gold-mountain/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Tales of the NFB Cafeteria (with juicy details!)

Ever wonder what goes on behind the storied walls of the National Film Board’s Montreal headquarters? Finally, we can show you.

Like many places of work, the most interesting stuff usually happens outside of the individual offices. It happens in the common areas like the water cooler, and of course, the cafeteria. Luckily for us, animator Janet Perlman documented some of her favourite memories in true NFB-fashion – with images and words. 

Janet Perlman

Janet is an Oscar®-nominated writer and director, as well as a children’s book author/illustrator. For decades, her work has been intrinsically tied to the NFB. She developed the ShowPeace series, which includes Bully Dance and Dinner for Two, and is the filmmaker behind classics like The Tender Tale of Cinderella Penguin and Invasion of the Space Lobsters.  

In addition to giving workshops all around the world, Janet has taught animation at Harvard, The Rhode Island School of Design, and Concordia University. Her work with the NFB spans from the mid-seventies right up to the present.

On the occasion of our “BIG MOVE,” Janet has put together a series of true stories from her early filmmaking days at the NFB, a place for which she has great affection.


1. PETRIFIED BACON

2. MY LUNCH WITH NORMAN

I was
in awe of Norman McLaren, but I missed many opportunities to talk to him about
film and art, mainly because I was so shy. One day, in 1978, I was left alone
with him at lunch after everyone else finished eating. I recognized this as a special
moment, one that I would cherish forever! My mind raced searching for something
to say. This is what I came up with.

3. WRESTLERS!

Around
1982, there was an actual fist fight in the cafeteria! Another time, a bunch of
superstar pro wrestlers were at the NFB for a film shoot. There was Killer
Kowalski, Mad Dog Vachon and other big stars. They bought sandwiches and cake
slices and were very well-behaved. No chairs were broken!

4. FLOOR PLAN

The
cafeteria was at least twice the present size and was open until 4pm. Everyone
ate there. There was nowhere else to eat. At lunchtime there was a line-up that
went out the door and down the hall. There were machines with real sandwiches
in them for filmmakers who were working late hours.

5. SMOKETERIA

Everybody
smoked everywhere at the NFB. People dined in a cloud of Export “A”, Player’s
and Gitanes. Micheline Lanctot was directing a film in the animation studio,
and she smoked cigarillos, a kind of tiny cigar, which seemed very cool. Sorry
to say, I was responsible for some of that smoke. I’m glad those days are over.

6. THE MAITRE D’

One
cafeteria manager was an over-achiever. He wore a full chef’s uniform and bowed
and greeted people like he was a maitre d’. There was a salad bar, an
all-you-can-eat spaghetti day, and one time there was a lobster festival. It
was his version of a film festival!

7. THE COOKIE

8. HEROES OF THE CAFETERIA – Winnie

Winnie prepared all the breakfasts and sandwiches. Because she remembered every detail, you could just ask for “the usual”, which might be the “special”, or the “half-special”, with or without tomato slice. When your order was ready, she would ring a bell and make eye contact with you. She had such a good head for detail that she was given a job in the film lab. She was also cast in the starring role in Robert Awad’s film The National Scream.

9. HEROES OF THE CAFETERIA – Henry

Henry
ran the concession stand that sold candy and cigarettes. He was blind, and when
he was handed paper money, he had to ask if it was a one or a five or a twenty.
It would have been easy to cheat him, but I don’t think it ever happened. He
knew everyone by voice and it turns out that for years he’d been listening to
all of our conversations, in particular Grant Munro’s hilarious stories.

10. A PLACE FOR ART

The
animators held a group “paint-a-thon”, where each person painted the same
painting using the step-by-step instructions from a Bob Ross video. Each canvas
had the same rustic barn with a broken fence and a fiery sunset. They were all
exhibited in the cafeteria, and a few were even sold. You can see the results
of the second Bob Ross Revival Paint-a-thon, currently on display in Salle Bob
Ross in the French animation studio.

Other
exhibitions include Lois Siegel’s photographs of notable film personalities,
which were displayed and admired for many years.

11. CREATIVE JUICES

12. MODERN HEROES

This is not a tale, just a big thank you to our modern-day cafeteria heroes. Thank you for the millions of fries, the coffees, the sandwiches and the chit chats! You are the best!

The post Tales of the NFB Cafeteria (with juicy details!) appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/10/tales-of-the-nfb-cafeteria-janet-perlman/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Pause With Foley Artist Karla Baumgardner

Ever wonder what a Foley artist does, or how they do their jobs so well? Discover some tricks of the trade on this edition of NFB Pause.

This week on NFB Pause, we talked to Emmy-award winning Foley artist Karla Baumgardner. Karla came to Montreal to study as a mime but got a little sidetracked when she took a course in Foley art.

She’s now been working in the field for over 25 years, and has contributed to numerous NFB productions, including Freaks of Nurture, I Am Here, Bone Mother, and Threads. The Emmy was for her work on the popular animated TV series, Arthur.

Foley artists are the ones who reproduce all the sounds you hear on screen. When capturing sound on set, the focus is on dialogue. In order to appear as realistic as possible, sound is added in post-production to simulate things like footsteps, gunshots, breaking glass, etc.

Their work is mostly behind the scenes, and there are relatively few of them, but their contribution is essential to the films we watch every day, whether live-action or animated.

This area of film production might be new to some of you, but Foley artists have been around since the first picture with sound was produced. When The Jazz Singer was released, it included work by a Mr. Jack Donavan Foley, and a brand new art form was born… and named.

kb_02
kb_03
kb_04

Foley artist Karla Baumgardner

NFB

Each artist works differently, of course, but there are a few basic commonalities in the trade. Karla will screen a film and take notes. She will mark each place in the script where sound is needed, effectively creating a sound breakdown. She will then research the best ways to reproduce the sounds and ensure she has all the tools in her kit to do the job. If not, she’ll obtain them.

I found this part fascinating, and asked Karla if she would share the 5 essential items for any Foley artist. She gave me the following:

  1. A bag of fabric, various types and textures. This is great for reproducing the movement of clothing on a character in a film.
  2. A box with various pieces of metal. Ideal for creating loud noises, squeaks and thunder. A hinge is key – good for all kinds of sounds.
  3. A box of plastic and rubber. Perfect for stretching sounds.
  4. A tube of hair gel. You heard that right. Believe it or not, you can use it to recreate a melting sound, or anything viscous.
  5. A signature prop; something that’s all yours. Karla’s is the Om Wand – it whooshes through the air making an eerie sound like a laser beam in outer space.

See what else Karla has to say in this edition of NFB Pause.

The post NFB Pause With Foley Artist Karla Baumgardner appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/09/nfb-pause-foley-artist-karla-baumgardner/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

NFB Pause With Foley Artist Karla Baumgardner

Ever wonder what a Foley artist does, or how they do their jobs so well? Discover some tricks of the trade on this edition of NFB Pause.

This week on NFB Pause, we talked to Emmy-award winning Foley artist Karla Baumgardner. Karla came to Montreal to study as a mime but got a little sidetracked when she took a course in Foley art.

She’s now been working in the field for over 25 years, and has contributed to numerous NFB productions, including Freaks of Nurture, I Am Here, Bone Mother, and Threads. The Emmy was for her work on the popular animated TV series, Arthur.

Foley artists are the ones who reproduce all the sounds you hear on screen. When capturing sound on set, the focus is on dialogue. In order to appear as realistic as possible, sound is added in post-production to simulate things like footsteps, gunshots, breaking glass, etc.

Their work is mostly behind the scenes, and there are relatively few of them, but their contribution is essential to the films we watch every day, whether live-action or animated.

This area of film production might be new to some of you, but Foley artists have been around since the first picture with sound was produced. When The Jazz Singer was released, it included work by a Mr. Jack Donavan Foley, and a brand new art form was born… and named.

kb_02
kb_03
kb_04

Foley artist Karla Baumgardner

NFB

Each artist works differently, of course, but there are a few basic commonalities in the trade. Karla will screen a film and take notes. She will mark each place in the script where sound is needed, effectively creating a sound breakdown. She will then research the best ways to reproduce the sounds and ensure she has all the tools in her kit to do the job. If not, she’ll obtain them.

I found this part fascinating, and asked Karla if she would share the 5 essential items for any Foley artist. She gave me the following:

  1. A bag of fabric, various types and textures. This is great for reproducing the movement of clothing on a character in a film.
  2. A box with various pieces of metal. Ideal for creating loud noises, squeaks and thunder. A hinge is key – good for all kinds of sounds.
  3. A box of plastic and rubber. Perfect for stretching sounds.
  4. A tube of hair gel. You heard that right. Believe it or not, you can use it to recreate a melting sound, or anything viscous.
  5. A signature prop; something that’s all yours. Karla’s is the Om Wand – it whooshes through the air making an eerie sound like a laser beam in outer space.

See what else Karla has to say in this edition of NFB Pause.

The post NFB Pause With Foley Artist Karla Baumgardner appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/09/nfb-pause-foley-artist-karla-baumgardner/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

New on NFB Education – May 2019

Did you know that NFB Education updates its films, playlists, and educational offers every week? With so much content constantly being added to our site, we know it can be hard to keep up—especially when you’re busy. With that in mind, we’ve created a handy guide that teachers can reference.

Check back every month for more documentaries, animation, and resource learning materials you can use in the classroom!

Here’s everything new on NFB Education this May!

EDUCATIONAL FILMS ON CAMPUS

Bevel Up

Bevel Up follows street nurses as they reach out to people working in the sex trade, and people who use drugs in the alleys and hotels of Vancouver’s inner city. Most importantly the nurses reflect on the attitudes they bring to their work—attitudes that can make or break their relationships with the people to whom they provide practical, non-judgemental health care on a daily basis. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/bevel_up_drugs_users_and_outreach_nursing/

Supreme Law

Americans are passionate about their constitution. Canadians aren’t. Supreme Law is here to change that. This is an entertaining and rich resource for anyone who wants to understand the stories behind the Canadian Constitution and how they continue to resonate today.

Explore the project now!

EDUCATIONAL PLAYLISTS

HOW TO REGISTER FOR A CAMPUS ACCOUNT

CAMPUS is our subscription-based VOD service that offers educators access to hundreds of exclusive educational films, lesson plans, study guides, film chaptering, and more. Your school may already be subscribed to CAMPUS. Use the links below to register your personal account and begin exploring all that CAMPUS has to offer!

Quebec

All Quebec English School Boards

All Quebec French School Boards

Saskatchewan

Network Services → Contact NetworkServices@gov.sk.ca

Ontario

Toronto District School Board

Peel District School Board

If you cannot find your institution, please contact our customer service by email at info@nfb.ca or call 1-800-267-7710.

Questions? Comments?

If you have any questions or comments about any of our CAMPUS features, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Discover more Educational blog posts | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on Pinterest

The post New on NFB Education – May 2019 appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/06/new-on-nfb-education-may-2019/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards 2019 | Watch 8 Short Docs on Famous Canadians

This year, seven of Canada’s greatest performing arts stars and champions were awarded a Governor General’s Performing Arts Award, a prestigious annual distinction presented in collaboration with the National Arts Center.

As is now tradition, we produced a series of short documentary films that celebrate the artistic achievements of this year’s laureates.

Enjoy the films!

Sandra Oh

Inspired by Sandra Oh’s words and actions, director Karen Lam experiments with the concept of representation in the performing arts.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/sandra-oh-inspiration/

Rick Mercer

While gift shopping at an “enlightened” toy store, a mother and son are out of luck finding the latest Spider-Man and Transformers toys—because all this eccentric shopkeeper proudly sells are Rick Mercer-themed toys that are meant to inspire the next generation of Canadian youth.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/rick-mercer-take-action-figures/

Colm Feore

After winning a lifetime achievement award, there’s nowhere left to go but down… into the bowels of the Afterlifetime Achievement Agency, a placement service that helps Laureates find their next gig.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/afterlifetime-of-colm-feore/

Mavis Staines

When Mavis Staines took the helm of Canada’s National Ballet School in 1989, the pedagogy of ballet was due for an evolution. Driven by a belief system that honoured tradition but challenged outdated practices, Staines set in motion a paradigm shift that has transformed ballet training in Canada and around the world.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mavis-staines-sharing-dance/

E. Noël Spinelli

The son of a humble Italian immigrant, E. Noël Spinelli has dedicated most of his life to making music accessible to his blue-collar community of Lachine, Quebec. This short film offers a poignant emotional journey into his deep love of opera and Puccini, quietly revealing what music has given to Mr. Spinelli, and why he is so passionately committed to sharing its magical gifts.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/noel-spinelli-sharing-the-magic-of-music/

Louise Bessette

A piano behaves strangely during a concert given by pianist Louise Bessette in an old manor.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/louises-piano/

Lorraine Pintal

Directed by Ariane Louis-Seize, this tribute film was created as a gift for Lorraine Pintal, director of Montreal’s Théâtre du Nouveau Monde. Featuring some of the most memorable characters and performers of Pintal’s career, the film’s succession of surreal scenes from different dramatic worlds introduces viewers to the exceptional woman of theatre, stage director, and friend whom they consider to be the “ghost light” of Quebec theatre.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/lorraine-pintal-so-the-light-never-dies/

The post Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards 2019 | Watch 8 Short Docs on Famous Canadians appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/03/governor-generals-performing-arts-awards-2019/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards 2019 | Watch 8 Short Docs on Famous Canadians

This year, seven of Canada’s greatest performing arts stars and champions were awarded a Governor General’s Performing Arts Award, a prestigious annual distinction presented in collaboration with the National Arts Center.

As is now tradition, we produced a series of short documentary films that celebrate the artistic achievements of this year’s laureates.

Enjoy the films!

Sandra Oh

Inspired by Sandra Oh’s words and actions, director Karen Lam experiments with the concept of representation in the performing arts.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/sandra-oh-inspiration/

Rick Mercer

While gift shopping at an “enlightened” toy store, a mother and son are out of luck finding the latest Spider-Man and Transformers toys—because all this eccentric shopkeeper proudly sells are Rick Mercer-themed toys that are meant to inspire the next generation of Canadian youth.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/rick-mercer-take-action-figures/

Colm Feore

After winning a lifetime achievement award, there’s nowhere left to go but down… into the bowels of the Afterlifetime Achievement Agency, a placement service that helps Laureates find their next gig.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/afterlifetime-of-colm-feore/

Mavis Staines

When Mavis Staines took the helm of Canada’s National Ballet School in 1989, the pedagogy of ballet was due for an evolution. Driven by a belief system that honoured tradition but challenged outdated practices, Staines set in motion a paradigm shift that has transformed ballet training in Canada and around the world.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/mavis-staines-sharing-dance/

E. Noël Spinelli

The son of a humble Italian immigrant, E. Noël Spinelli has dedicated most of his life to making music accessible to his blue-collar community of Lachine, Quebec. This short film offers a poignant emotional journey into his deep love of opera and Puccini, quietly revealing what music has given to Mr. Spinelli, and why he is so passionately committed to sharing its magical gifts.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/noel-spinelli-sharing-the-magic-of-music/

Louise Bessette

A piano behaves strangely during a concert given by pianist Louise Bessette in an old manor.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/louises-piano/

Lorraine Pintal

Directed by Ariane Louis-Seize, this tribute film was created as a gift for Lorraine Pintal, director of Montreal’s Théâtre du Nouveau Monde. Featuring some of the most memorable characters and performers of Pintal’s career, the film’s succession of surreal scenes from different dramatic worlds introduces viewers to the exceptional woman of theatre, stage director, and friend whom they consider to be the “ghost light” of Quebec theatre.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/lorraine-pintal-so-the-light-never-dies/

The post Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards 2019 | Watch 8 Short Docs on Famous Canadians appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/03/governor-generals-performing-arts-awards-2019/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Explore All 10 Bevel Up Educational Playlists

Bevel Up is a professional learning resource that follows street nurses as they deliver non-judgmental, compassionate and trauma-informed healthcare to people who use drugs and work in the sex trade on the streets of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.

  • At its heart, Bevel Up is a 45-minute documentary that can be seen in whole or divided into eight chapters. Each chapter is augmented by menus that further explore the medical, legal and ethical questions raised in the street encounters portrayed in the documentary.
  • Bevel Up creates a dialogue for exploring stigma and discrimination. It demonstrates what a non-judgmental relationship can look like between nurses and people who use drugs.  
  • It was originally launched in 2007 as an interactive DVD with a comprehensive Teacher’s Guide.
  • The documentary is now, for the first time, available for free online at NFB.ca.

What content can you find online?

  • 10 playlists include a total of 4.5 hours of digitized audiovisual content supported by a 100-page Teacher’s Guide in PDF format.
  • Bevel Up is built around a 45-minute documentary with eight (8) chapters that follow nurses as they interact with and bring healthcare to people who use drugs.
  • The chapters are augmented by the following menus: Reflections on Practice and + Topics. These include 80 clips (40 in English, 40 in French), each ranging from 1 to 18 minutes in length, that are now displayed and accessible on the web. These topics feature experts– people who use drugs and healthcare practitioners. They examine the medical, legal and ethical questions raised in the street encounters portrayed in the documentary.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/bevel_up_drugs_users_and_outreach_nursing/

Chapter 1 – Opening

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

In the film’s opening chapter, the nurses pack their bags and head to the streets. Their interactions demonstrate the complexities of delivering effective and non-judgemental health care to people who use drugs.

Chapter 2 – Wheels & Barry

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

Chapter 2 examines the challenges outreach nurses face when they take health care to the city’s streets, parks, alleys, and hotels.

Chapter 3 – Linda

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

Chapter 3 demonstrates communication skills and how to negotiate with people who are using drugs.

Chapter 4 – Becky & Liz

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

In Chapter 4, the street nurses confront a practice challenge and a difficult ethical question; they attempt to bring health care to a pregnant woman who is using drugs and contemplate how to respond when their health-care agenda clashes with the needs of the person receiving care.

Chapter 5 – Street Youth

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

In Chapter 5, the nurse uses harm-reduction strategies to help youth stay safe on the streets—including while they’re using drugs.

Chapter 6 – Lee

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

Chapter 6 follows the street nurses as they create a non-judgmental and safe environment in the outreach van when providing health care to a sex worker who uses drugs.

Chapter 7 – Long Tran

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

There are often significant hurdles for nurses working with refugees or immigrants who use drugs, including language barriers and dealing with people who are living with the effects of trauma and social isolation.

Chapter 8 – Conclusion

Explore the Teaching Manual for this chapter.

The day is over, but the street nurses’ work has only just begun. Find out how nurses care for themselves and listen as they talk about shaping harm-reduction practice.

Chapter 9 – Reflections on Practice

A collection of all the Reflections on Practice for the Bevel Up series.

Chapter 10 – +Topics

A collection of all the +Topics for the Bevel Up series.

Discover more Educational blog posts | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on Pinterest

The post Explore All 10 Bevel Up Educational Playlists appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/03/bevel-up-educational-playlists/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

How We Selected 80 NFB Productions to Commemorate Our 80th Anniversary

As part of our commemoration of the National Film Board’s 80th anniversary, we decided to choose a symbolic 80 powerful productions to highlight 80 years of exceptional storytelling by our great institution. But how do you select 80 titles out of a collection that numbers more than 13,000?

As the NFB’s English collection curator, this was my challenge. Obviously, this list is entirely subjective, so some of the titles you might consider to be the most impactful may not be here. I tried to choose titles that had an impact on audiences—but also ones that had an impact on me. These are my choices, and I stand by them.

It was obvious that certain classic films would have to be part of this list. It will not surprise anyone that films like Norman McLaren’s Neighbours and Roman Kroitor and Colin Low’s Universe are on my list. How could they not be? 

Neighbours won the NFB’s second Oscar ever and, at one time, was our film with the most theatrical bookings worldwide (77,000 as of 1987). It was named a Masterwork by the Canadian Audio-Visual Heritage trust in 2000 and was added to UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register nine years later.  

Universe was nominated for an Oscar and went on to win 25 awards, including one at Cannes. It also heavily influenced Stanley Kubrick in the making of 2001: A Space Odyssey (for one thing, Universe’s narrator, Douglas Rain, is the voice of HAL!). 

These films and other classics are certainly on the list, but I had a great deal of fun choosing other important films from our collection that might not make anyone else’s list. Here are some of them, and why I chose them: 

Waterwalker

OK, every one of my colleagues will not be surprised to see that I’ve selected this Bill Mason film. It is, after all, my absolute favourite NFB film of all time, but it’s also a very significant environmental film. It can best be described as poetry in motion. A visual poem accompanied by the haunting music of Bruce Cockburn and Hugh Marsh. It’s an ode to the majesty of nature. Need I say more? 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/waterwalker/

Black Soul 

This animated masterpiece will certainly make the list for most people. What strikes me when I watch it is that in a scant nine minutes, it beautifully encapsulates Black culture and Black history so eloquently. Animator Martine Chartrand painstakingly painted every single image on glass to create this stunning film. The winner of many awards, including a Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/black_soul/

High Grass Circus 

A one-hour Oscar-nominated gem that follows the Royal Brothers Circus throughout small-town Ontario. Now this isn’t a sophisticated Cirque du Soleil-type show, but a grass-roots, low-budget troupe that includes two elephants, a hippo and a revolving door of stagehands and fire breathers. Funny, touching and a beautiful slice of life. Be prepared to smile when you see it. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/high_grass_circus/

Totem: The Return of The G’psgolox Pole 

Gil Cardinal’s 2003 documentary follows the Haisla people from British Columbia in their efforts to reclaim the G’psgolox pole, which was taken from them and displayed in a Stockholm museum for over 60 years. A powerful documentary that shows that when the cause is just, nothing can stop people from succeeding.  

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/totem_the_return_of_the_gpsgolox_pole/

Threads 

If you’re a parent, you will be deeply touched by this wistful animated film by Oscar winner Torill Kove. What are the threads that bind a mother and daughter, and when is it time to let our children go out on their own? A magnificent film told without words.  

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/threads/

Nahanni 

This gem from 1962 is a visually stunning film, but what makes it so great is the terrific storytelling. As much about man versus nature as it is about man versus himself, this is the story of Albert Faille, who, at 73, is trying—once again—to find a mythical lost gold mine located somewhere on the Nahanni river. This isn’t fiction, it’s real life—raw, unscripted and with danger around every corner. A gripping, intense study of a frail old man persevering against an inhospitable landscape. Will he succeed? A must-see. 

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/nahanni/

My entire list of 80 productions is available hereHave a look and let me know what you think in the comments. 

Do you want to see which titles my colleague Marc St-Pierre, the French collection curator, put on his list of 80 productions? Click here

Want to find out more about the founding of the NFB? Click here to read Marc’s blog post on the creation and early years of this unique place. 

Happy 80th anniversary to the NFB, and may it continue its great history of insightful storytelling. 

The post How We Selected 80 NFB Productions to Commemorate Our 80th Anniversary appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/02/80-nfb-productions-for-our-80th-anniversary/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Five Feminist Minutes: Another Look

It
was versatile and winning formula, the perfect way to celebrate the
achievements of Studio D while extending its reach into new communities.

Five Feminist Minutes first saw the light in 1989 when Rina Fraticelli,
Executive Producer of the NFB’s pioneering women’s unit, was looking for ways
to mark Studio D’s 15th year. 
Conceived as an omnibus program, an anthology of shorts that would
accommodate a multiplicity of fresh voices and stories, Five Feminist Minutes circulated widely, opening doors for new
women filmmakers across Canada.

Thirty
years down the road, as Canada’s public producer marks its 80th anniversary and
Studio D marks its 45th, the NFB has collaborated with Hot Docs to revisit the
project.

With Five Feminist Minutes
2019
, four contemporary directors have made
shorts in the spirit of the original series, each citing a title from the 1990
program as inspiration. 

All eight films are screening at the 2019 edition of Hot Docs — and as of May 1 all eight are available online at nfb.ca

Gone Fishing: Alexandra Lazarowich Honours Indigenous Knowledge

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/lake/

It’s 25 below, a fine and frigid winter day, and Alexandra Lazarowich and her crew are tagging along as Jamie Linington and Maureen Caudron-Bell venture out onto the vast frozen surface of Lesser Slave Lake to go net fishing — something that generations of local Cree and Métis people have done before them.

“It
was great to just be there, to watch them work,” says Lazarowich, whose quietly
compelling short Lake evokes the
observational vérité docs of the 60s and 70s. “Indigenous labour is never just
work. It’s cultural practice, our Indigenous knowledge. It’s how we are in the
world.”

“There’s
lots a stake right now, with ongoing struggles over fishing rights, but I
wanted the film’s power to be its simplicity,” says Lazarowich. “I’ve known
Jamie for ages, and I see value in simply observing people you know doing
something they do well, something they’ve always done.”

Whether working as a visual artist, storyteller, producer or director – Lazarowich is passionate about Indigenous stories. “I want to make films in which Indigenous people get to see themselves,” she says. Her credits include Rights for Indian Women, Out of Nothing, Cree Code Talker, Crooked Creek, Empty Metal, INAATE/SE/ and Alvaro. Fast Horse, her thrilling and beautiful short about the Indian Relay, arguably the continent’s original extreme sport, was named Best Short Documentary at ImagineNATIVE in 2018 and won the Special Jury Prize for Directing at Sundance earlier this year.

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/minqon-minqon-wosqotomn-elsonwagon-shirley-bear/

Lazarowich
has drawn inspiration from Minqon
Minqon: Wosqotomn Elsonwagon (Shirley Bear: Reclaiming the Balance of Power)
,
Catherine Martin’s profile of the Maliseet artist Shirley Bear, also known as
Minqon Minqon (Rainbow Rainbow). “I really like how Catherine Martin represents
the ideas of the tradition and knowledge, and I love how Shirley challenges the
misrepresentation of Indigenous women. Her art practice is completely embedded
in Indigenous knowledge, and that’s something I wanted to explore with Lake. Jamie and Maureen are also artists
in their own way.”

Pictured above, Alexandra’s crew: Charlene Moore, Maureen Caudron-Bell, Kevin Bell, Alex Lazarowich herself, DOP Lindsay McIntyre, Jade Baxter, Jamie Linington and producer Coty Savard.

Two
members of Lazarowich’s all-Indigenous crew on Lake – assistant camerawoman Jade Baxter and sound recordist
Charlene Moore – are participating in the 2019 edition of Hot Docs’ Accelerator
Program. “I’m at a point in my career where I get to flex that muscle, to open
doors for other people,” she say, “and that feels good.”

Lake was
produced by Coty Savard and David Christensen at the North West Studio.

Radical: Here Comes Walsh

oehttp://www.nfb.ca/film/radical/

Mary
Walsh, the great warrior queen of Canadian comedy, has never been afraid to
speak truth to power, wielding her satiric styrofoam sword at the most powerful
men in the country.

A
founding member of the groundbreaking comedy troupe Codco, she has gone on
co-create and star in the weekly program This
Hour Has Twenty Minutes
, direct the feature film Young Triffie, and write Crying
for the Moon
, a novel based on her tumultuous St. John’s youth.

Now
the featured subject of Deanne Foley’s short film Radical, Walsh addresses the subject of aging women with a
characteristic blend of riotous wit and impassioned smarts.

Deanne Foley, Mary Walsh and Annette Clarke ©David Howells 2019 http://www.davehowellsphoto.com

“She’s a fearless force of nature, and she’s made an indelible mark on Newfoundland and Canadian culture,” says producer Annette Clarke, “As soon as we started talking about revisiting Five Feminist Minutes, my first thought was, who better than the iconic Mary Walsh — in collaboration with the enormously talented Deanne Foley. It took one riotous conversation over lunch to discover the radical theme.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/come-into-my-parlour/

Foley
came onboard immediately. “I’d recently seen this wonderful TED talk that Walsh
had done, all about woman and aging,” says Foley. “Once women hit 50 or so, she
said, women stop from being an object of desire and start being the subject of
their own life. As a woman in her 40s, I was immediately intrigued. It’s such
an empowering concept.”

In
five tonic and entertaining minutes, Foley intercuts a spirited interview with
Walsh with scenes from one of her legendary performances. “I wanted to capture
her humour of course, but also her razor-sharp intelligence,” says Foley, “I
wanted to get into the head and heart of a performer who we all dearly love.”

Mary
Lewis’ 1990 debut film Come Into My
Parlour
, a profile of a dauntless spinster aunt, another forceful
Newfoundland woman, would serve as Foley’s inspiration. “That film is one of
the reasons I decided to become a filmmaker myself,” says Foley. “I love that
Mary shot part of her film on Bell Island, where we both have family roots, and
I too was blessed with inspiring aunties, strong interesting women who weren’t
afraid of anything.”

Radical was written by Mary Walsh and produced
by Annette Clarke at the Quebec-Atlantic Studio.

Putting Patriarchy to the Camera Test

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/camera-test/

With Camera Test, Joyce Wong interviews a
group of female film industry veterans to craft a tartly subversive look at
patriarchy and racism in the commercial film world.

“There’ve been many important conversations on the way sexual violence has affected women’s ability to participate in the film industry,” says Wong (pictured below). “I wanted to expand the conversation, to examine the subtler things that get lost when women’s voices are stymied during the creative process.”

The
featured performers are subjected to an increasingly absurd series of camera
tests, with sexist direction from an off-screen male director — all juxtaposed
with audio interviews with women in the industry. “The sexist feedback that
women are forced to implement translates to ridiculous onscreen results,” says
Wong, “and the camera test device was a succinct way of showing that direct
correlation.”

“No director sets out to make a bad film, but a great idea can become something completely incoherent when you’re being inundated with a constant stream of misogynistic feedback. Our voices often get dismissed, bastardized or lost altogether — and that’s a tragedy because good ideas are so valuable when you’re making films.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/untilled-story/

Back in
1990, the directorial team of Frances Leeming and Quinn made a playful
contribution to the original Five Feminist Minutes with The Untilled Story, a feminist riff on
vintage NFB instructional films that tipped its stylish hat to the musicals of
Busby Berkeley.

The Untilled Story looks how patriarchy
limits the ability of women to do their jobs in the workplace, and that’s what
really spoke to me,” says Wong, “and on an aesthetic level, I really connected
with the film’s mischievous tone and its faux vintage approach.”

Camera Test features pointedly comic performances
from Amy Matysio, Gail Maurice and Rahhee Morzaria – and reunites Wong with DOP
Maya Bankovic who shot Wong’s debut feature Wexford Plaza. Written and directed by Wong, it performed well onthe international festival circuit,
winning the Best Feature Award at both the San Diego and Austin Asian Film
Festivals along with the Best Narrative Feature Award at San Francisco’s
CAAMFEST. The Los Angeles Times
praised Wexford Plaza for its “deft
script and sure-handed” and has tapped Wong as “a major talent to watch.” The Power of Love, Wong’s engaging
short doc about Celine Dion’s Kenyan fan base, premiered at Hot Docs in 2011.

Camera Test was produced by Justine Pimlott at the
Ontario Studio.

Question Period: Ann Marie Fleming Listens…

oehttp://www.nfb.ca/film/question-period/

Back
in 2015 Ann Marie Fleming was among the Canadians who answered the call to
assist incoming refugees from the war in Syria, opening her Vancouver home,
which is how she befriended the women and girls featured in Question Period.

“It’s
impossible for most of us to know what our other human beings have experienced
— but it is possible for us to
listen,” says Fleming.  With Question Period, she has audiences
listen as these women become agents of their own story.  “I’m extremely grateful for their
generosity, their openness and trust, their willingness to make this film with
me.”

In
crafting the film as a ‘sound poem,’ Fleming chose to record her subjects’
voices off-camera. “Like many immigrants, they tend to keep a low profile and
not to speak out, and were more at ease without a camera. They’re used to being
asked questions about their culture and religion and such – but I was
interested in hearing them ask their own questions. Ironically, while finding a
safe haven in Canada, in many aspects of their life, they found themselves with
less choices here as women than they would have had at home.”

DOP Lindsay George, line producer Jennifer Roworth, Manar Alsaid Ahmed, and director Ann Marie Fleming.

Recorded
individually, the voices come together in the final mix to form a textured
chorus, with some speaking English and others murmuring softly in Arabic.
“Whispers of their mother tongue,” as Fleming put it, “showing how much more
they could say.”

Meanwhile Manar, the face of the film, is quietly demonstrating the simple act of putting on a hijab. “It’s the most everyday ritual but also one that’s contentious for some people,” says Fleming. As Manar slowly completes the process, the film bleeds from black-and-white into colour. “We’re moving from iconic documentary style into more familiar, quotidian terrain,” says Fleming. “We begin to see her more fully. She becomes part of us.”

oehttps://www.nfb.ca/film/new-shoes-an-interview-in-exactly-five-minutes/

Fleming describes Question Period as a sister film to her 1990 short New Shoes: An Interview in Exactly Five
Minutes
. “All my films are personal: they’re about my own experiences or
those of people who are part of my life. These two films are both opposites and
similar. Gaye, the subject of New Shoes,
is a friend of mine who had this incredible tale of domestic violence, one
that helped change gun laws in Ontario. I interviewed her in what was my
kitchen, serving her tea from great-grandfather’s teapot.   Manar doesn’t actually speak on
camera, but she too was filmed in my home. With Question Period, I’m not interviewing anyone, I’m just listening:
the women had carte blanche to ask anything they wanted.  But both are
portraits of women that speak to larger societal and global issues. Both are
about trauma, violence and endurance.  They were also shot in a similar
way, with an inside and an outside. Both play with tone and texture, and rely
heavily on the sound to tell the fuller story.  They are like sisters.”

Fleming works in a variety of genres, from
animation and documentary, experimental and drama), exploring themes of
identity and memory in beautifully crafted work like Window Horses, an animated feature starring Sandra Oh, and You Take Care Now, hailed by TIFF as
one of the best shorts in Canadian film history. Other NFB-produced credits
include The
Magical Life of Long Tack Sam

and I
Was A Child of Holocaust Survivors
.

“I’m an immigrant as well,” says Fleming, “but it wasn’t until after I’d finished the film that I realized the direct connection to my subjects: my own family has lived through war, has survived natural and other disasters. In the not too distant past, they too were displaced peoples who either chose or were forced to leave their homes.”

Question Time was produced by Shirley Vercruysse at the BC & Yukon Studio.

Pictured in banner: Manar Alseid Ahmed in Question Period.

The post Five Feminist Minutes: Another Look appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/01/five-feminist-minutes-four-directors-take-another-look/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!

Film

Supreme Law | Engage Students with an Interactive Website on Canada’s Constitution

A new interactive website, Supreme Law, allows teachers and students to explore the 1982 repatriation of the Constitution from a multitude of perspectives. An exploration of this website will not only enhance student understanding of the time period, but it will also help students critically explore how history is presented. Key questions to frame lessons can include “Who writes history?” and “Whose history should we read?”

Explore Supreme Law now!

Five different takes on one event

This website should
appeal to any teacher who is looking to bring energy to their civics, politics
or history class, and also to those who are seeking to enhance student
understanding of the rich perspectives that make up our diverse country. The
website explores the negotiations and background of the 1982 repatriation of
the Constitution through five different lenses: that of the Prime Minister, the
West, Quebec, Indigenous peoples and women. All scenarios feature a video acted
out with humour by some of Canada’s well-known Internet stars.  

The historic fight to entrench Indigenous
rights and gender equality

Today’s students are
savvy and increasingly aware of their own rights. They are often front and
centre in the battle for these rights. This is why the sections of the Supreme
Law
website on women and Indigenous rights are of such significance in
the classroom. Students will have a chance to contextualize their own fight for
human rights and see how the implementation of the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms was a game-changer. 

Animated by the likeable and at-times justifiably outraged Baker Twins,
the section on Indigenous rights
demonstrates how intensely Indigenous leaders had to fight to get a mention of
their rights in the Constitution. It would be interesting for teachers to
parallel this section with the continued work coming out of the Truth and
Reconciliation Commission or Idle No More.  

Students may be
familiar with the Persons Case of 1929 and the fact that women were not always considered
to be “persons” in Canada. The Supreme Law website helps advance
the discussion on gender equality even further. Canadian television host and YouTuber
Rachel David explains how ordinary women across the country pushed their
elected representatives for a more inclusive Charter. It’s a story that not
only highlights the fight for gender equality, but also shows the impact that citizens
can have on their government.

Ottawa, Quebec and the West – Tensions in the
past that still have an impact today

Key events across the
country are often reported differently depending on the target audience.  This remains true today, and it certainly was
the case in 1982. The sections on the Prime Minister, the West and Quebec are a
great way to teach how one story plays out differently across the country. Students
can explore the perspective of Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau, played by
comedian Jus Reign sporting a makeshift Trudeau-style fringe leather jacket.  There is also the competing perspectives of
the West and Quebec—two fundamentally different views of what happened during that time. The
impact of these negotiations continues to influence society, and an exploration
of these sections should help students gain a perspective on how historical
tensions still influence relations among modern provinces and the federal
government.

Deep Dives – An option for in-depth examination
of the issues

For teachers who want
to extend the activity, there are a variety of Deep Dive sections on the
website. Of particular interest may be the exploration of key Supreme Court
decisions based on the Charter, or the exploration of how Indigenous leaders
took their fight to the United Kingdom as well as to the United Nations in
order to be heard.

Our world is polarizing more every day. Having students explore a subject from many angles has positive impacts beyond content. The Supreme Law website can be a jumping-off point for helping students to see modern issues from more than one lens. As a bonus, students will likely be amused and entertained when learning about the Constitution—a first step to helping them remember its supreme importance.

Carla McIvor currently teaches Social Studies at West Island College in Calgary, Alberta. She has also taught courses ranging from Philosophy to Comparative Government in British Columbia and Ontario. Carla has a B.A. in Political Science from McGill University, a B.Ed. from University of Ottawa and a master’s degree in International Relations from the University of Geneva.

Discover more Educational blog posts | Subscribe to the NFB Education Newsletter | Follow NFB Education on Facebook | Follow NFB Education on Twitter | Follow NFB Education on PinterestD

The post Supreme Law | Engage Students with an Interactive Website on Canada’s Constitution appeared first on NFB Blog.

Vía https://blog.nfb.ca/blog/2019/05/01/supreme-law-engage-students-with-an-interactive-website-on-canadas-constitution/
ʕ ᴖᴥᴖʔ Subscribe to me here on Youtube!